Escape From 'The New Normal'?

AntoniusofEfa

Kingfisher
The wealth is not found in the cities in Switzerland as far as I know. Thank you for the input guys! I am just looking for a place that is European, yet not in the EU.

In a sneaky way, the German Gov. has OK'ed the EU debt union.


This means, more devaluation of the Euro will come up in the upcoming decade. The EU might also start imposing its own "EU Tax".

I see Switzerland as the eye of the storm, since it is the home of many NWO institutes and head figures.
 
Yeah my Swiss friend went through a weird phase where he spent a lot of money on things like watches and cars.

It was hard to understand it. His family has money and I guess he wanted to do something fun.

I guess it’s part of the maturation process. At least he did it young.

My mom spent a bunch of money she didn’t have on luxury cars after we all left home in disgust after her abuse and negligence. Pretty pathetic to see a 60 year old woman trying to fulfill herself with toys.
 

Oberrheiner

Pelican
Anyone in Switzerland? To an outside, it looks like a perfect place. Low taxes, real borders, a rather lax weapons law, and a bunch of work available in the embedded electronics area.
It's extremely rare to actually own a supercar in switzerland, they're all leased.
A truck is cool but you can't park anywhere, even a mid-sized saloon will often be a problem.
But yeah nobody cares about cars anyway, they're all in love with their public transports.

Kindergarten in zurick is 2500 per month per child, it's generally not at all a welcoming place for children.
Work in embedded electronics is often outsourced to germany for obvious reasons .. there are some place but it's hard to get in, expect 100k as an engineer, bit more bit less.
A small house or a well-located mid-size flat costs a million (and you'll never own it), the other numbers from LTG are real too.
 

AntoniusofEfa

Kingfisher
I was looking into the ease of doing business as a parameter for my decision. Switzerland seems superior to Germany in that regard, while also having a lower tax burden. Here in Germany it is insanely high, allowing only the big companies to actually generate a profit.
 

r3d

Sparrow
The Swiss can be extremely arrogant and discriminatory against foreigners. I've worked there briefly and it was a huge pain to deal with them.(Then again, I'm German and they have an extra bit of disdain for us specifically)

But no matter where you're from, I would go for an extended holiday before making decisions. Certain personality types will be absolutely miserable in most parts of CH.
 
Switzerland is extremely competitive and the lower taxes get offset by the very high prices of living in my opinion. Additionally, as my fellow German stated, if you are a foreigner, you are looked down upon, which is totally fine by the way; you just have to keep that in mind, especially if you are American.
 

britguy88

Pigeon
The thing about southern Europe is you get an extended summer. I've lived in Greece, where it's stays fairly hot in October and is warm and pleasant in November. And I've spent a lot of time in southern France, where it still felt like summer in October many years. In southern Spain my niece has been out sunbathing in December, so if you like the sun then southern Europe is a good destination. Also it could be we're going to experience some very cold weather in this Grand Solar Minimum, though NASA says it's offset by co2, global warming, blah, blah, blah.
I have been in the Algarve, Portugal all winter and been pleasantly surprised by how nice the weather has been and this is coming from someone who always winters in the tropics!

Many days in January were around 20C (68F) with hardly any rainfall. Had no need for heating at night either.

You also have Madeira island that will be a couple degrees higher and milder evenings too.

Portugal is definitely a decent option if you want to remain in the EU. The lockdown has been long here but thankfully not strictly enforced e.g. I rarely saw any police, which is in sharp contrast to Spain which is now a police state.
 

Grow Bag

Woodpecker
I have been in the Algarve, Portugal all winter and been pleasantly surprised by how nice the weather has been and this is coming from someone who always winters in the tropics!

Many days in January were around 20C (68F) with hardly any rainfall. Had no need for heating at night either.

You also have Madeira island that will be a couple degrees higher and milder evenings too.

Portugal is definitely a decent option if you want to remain in the EU. The lockdown has been long here but thankfully not strictly enforced e.g. I rarely saw any police, which is in sharp contrast to Spain which is now a police state.
Yeah, I preferred Portugal to Spain. It felt more laid back in many ways. If I was for relocating, Portugal would be high on my list.
 

Oberrheiner

Pelican
I was looking into the ease of doing business as a parameter for my decision. Switzerland seems superior to Germany in that regard, while also having a lower tax burden. Here in Germany it is insanely high, allowing only the big companies to actually generate a profit.
This is true. Now whether that offsets the rest is yours to decide.
 

Tippy

Sparrow
Where would you recommend out of:

Serbia
Ukraine
Albania
Croatia



Also, is anyone in Malaysia ? Any news on whether you can get in with a job there?

I'm guessing SEA will be strict on vaccine enforcement for the general culture of obedience there.
 
Portugal is definitely a decent option if you want to remain in the EU. The lockdown has been long here but thankfully not strictly enforced e.g. I rarely saw any police, which is in sharp contrast to Spain which is now a police state.

Can confirm what was said about Spain. The entire country has completely jumped the shark when it comes to COVID related restrictions. None of the rules make ANY sense and everyone knows it. But true to form everyone just bears it and says nothing.

It's a sad state of affairs for sure.
 
I spent some time in Switzerland a while ago (but not THAT long ago)...

A black friend went to a hairdresser to get his head shaved and came out looking like a hairy peach))... the hairdresser was that scared to break his black skin...

He was the only non-white in the canton most likely.



Haha... limiting belief much??

Real estate?


Any decent mutual fund or a mildly aggressive stock portfolio. If you can't consistently earn at least 10% and up to 15% with what the markets have done in the last 10 years, then you need a lot of help.

The actual rate of inflation is around 6-10% per year. Any investment that isn't at least 10% isn't even keeping up with the actual inflation rate [not the reported fake inflation numbers].
 
Not everyone can set an aggressive investment portfolio to earn 10-15%. Most people invest passively. I think 5-8% is more likely for most average investors.

The bigger growth numbers are from hedge funds, innovation funds, and some individual stocks. You have to be more active and interested to manage that yourself.

The market has had some huge yearly gains but that’s climbing out of a huge recession so not really accurate. Say you had your money in 2007 and lost 50% or more. Then is 15% gains in some years actually that 15%, or just getting back to where it was plus 5-8%?
 
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presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
Any decent mutual fund or a mildly aggressive stock portfolio. If you can't consistently earn at least 10% and up to 15% with what the markets have done in the last 10 years, then you need a lot of help.

The actual rate of inflation is around 6-10% per year. Any investment that isn't at least 10% isn't even keeping up with the actual inflation rate [not the reported fake inflation numbers].


If you can put together a capital preservation focused portfolio and turn 15% year in year out when we're not bouncing off a pullback or when there aren't huge liquidity drivers, you need to start your own fund. Or better yet write a book and sell millions of copies.
 
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If you can put together a capital preservation focused portfolio and turn 15% year in year out when we're not bouncing off a pullback or when there aren't huge liquidity drivers, you need to start your own fund. Or better yet write a book and sell millions of copies.

That's just what the world needs, another self-styled investment guru who claims "since it worked for me, my system can work for you too!" while pitching a book for $29.95 that won't work for 97% of people who try it because no two people are the same and there is no real one-size fits all investment strategy even though different strategies can get similar results. Since no two people are the same, no two people will be able to discern market conditions, read the signs, and time the market, or anticipate government action and central bank action based on a conspiratorial worldview, most people won't be able to implement similar strategies to get similar, let alone identical results.

The last thing anybody in this world needs is another book with some smiling guru hitting the shelf where the main objective of the guru would be to sell 4 million copies and make $12 million in the process.


I have absolutely no interest in starting a fund, managing other people's money, or being responsible for anything for other people beyond their legal problems in limited circumstances. Over the years I have developed a strong dislike of most people and I don't like the demands people make on me and my time and I certainly don't want to be responsible for managing tens of millions of dollars for what would likely prove to be an incessantly demanding group with an endless series of demands.
 
Not everyone can set an aggressive investment portfolio to earn 10-15%. Most people invest passively. I think 5-8% is more likely for most average investors.

The bigger growth numbers are from hedge funds, innovation funds, and some individual stocks. You have to be more active and interested to manage that yourself.

The market has had some huge yearly gains but that’s climbing out of a huge recession so not really accurate. Say you had your money in 2007 and lost 50% or more. Then is 15% gains in some years actually that 15%, or just getting back to where it was plus 5-8%?

I didn't have any stocks in 2007 at any point during that year. I bought a bunch of brutalized stocks in the aftermath of the 2007-2008 crash and then sold them in mid-late 2009 after the multiple rounds of bailouts. I made over 300% in 2009.

Citigroup made my 2009 for me because I bought in when it was less than $1 dollar per share.

Recently I sold all of my stock between December 2019 and the middle of February 2020 and I told any of my friends who would listen [none did] that "the market is going to crash, potentially any time now and I believe before the end of February..." One of my friends lost about $300,000 in the stock market between March and May of 2020, whereas I had zero stocks by the middle of February.

I presently have zero stocks.


We have two schools of thought.

One is mainstream drivel for mass bozo consumption which says "good times are here, don't worry..." 98% of small individual investors will follow this drivel.



We have another school of thought that is basically telling like it is...

 
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