Escape From 'The New Normal'?

ginsu

Woodpecker
That's clearly the agenda here in Spain. Which I predicted last spring already and sure enough they closed down the entire country right after the last summer tourists had left. Having the cake and wanting to eat it too - typical socialists/communists.

We basically get a few months of summer and then the new COVID-21 strains will be hyped starting in late fall. Come to think of it - they have not stopped really since early last fall. Maybe they'll just say fuggit and push it all the way through the summer. I wouldn't put it past them.
Italy was supposed to be 100% open during summer. They promised it and indeed we got one week of cafes and restaurants opening again which is a move in the right direction. Well a day ago a neighborhood locked down were Indian field workers live because of ''indian variant'' and they put signs up at the beach near there that you are not allowed to swim in the water. Doesn't really seem to mesh well with moving to 100% open during summer. I'm very skeptical, it only require a handful of their tests to say whatever and full lockdown is back on the menu
 

magaman

Sparrow
UK have extended their Covaids budget for advertising spend until March 2022.

No way will winter be normal anywhere in the G20 countries, with the odd exception like Mexico perhaps.

Normality returns when global communism has been installed.
I can't wait until someone runs for president of Earth with the mantra "Make Earth Great Again!". I look forward to seeing that show.
 

tom

Sparrow
IMed the guy and got an instant response.

He says no restrictions, only recommendations from government. Even in transit it is merely “recommended”. Most business don’t enforce with only a small number requiring.
Thanks

Could you ask him on the public trust in vaccines.
Here it seems like everyone I talk to irl is looking forward to a vaccine.
"It will be over when we get vaxxed" etc.
That's what I hate most.
30% percent of a poputlation doesn't want the vax. They'll be ok. 10% or something. that's small enough to start bringing out the stick
 
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wojak

Pigeon
Does anyone have ideas on how to "escape the city" without yet having the money needed to purchase a home? I still work in the city, but my lease is soon up and I'd like to relocate further out. The farther you get from the city, the less plentiful the rental options become.
 
@NoFunInAus - thanks for posting this! Just by looking at the face in the first video I already knew this was in Russia or another slavic country.
This is how I plan to live in a year or two. Completely remote with nothing but my Starlink dish out front and solar panels on my roof. Maybe head into town once per month to buy some groceries and pick up all those online orders I placed the month before.

Self sufficiency, a more simpler life, no noise, very little stress, and a ton of nature surrounding you. Basically paradise.

I honestly believe that the key to the survival of our cultural heritage is to extract ourselves to inhospitable remote places. Regroup there and slowly build up our own communities with our own rules. This can be done anywhere, you don't have to go to Siberia for that.

Here in Spain for example we have an autonomous region called Teruel which happens to be one of the most uninhabited regions in all of Europe. Teruel has a small capital by the same name but 2/3rd of its population lives in 236 municipalities, of which more than half are villages of under 200 people.

Maybe we RooshV members should start a community there. I would be happy to help out on that end.
 
@NoFunInAus - thanks for posting this! Just by looking at the face in the first video I already knew this was in Russia or another slavic country.
This is how I plan to live in a year or two. Completely remote with nothing but my Starlink dish out front and solar panels on my roof. Maybe head into town once per month to buy some groceries and pick up all those online orders I placed the month before.

Self sufficiency, a more simpler life, no noise, very little stress, and a ton of nature surrounding you. Basically paradise.

I honestly believe that the key to the survival of our cultural heritage is to extract ourselves to inhospitable remote places. Regroup there and slowly build up our own communities with our own rules. This can be done anywhere, you don't have to go to Siberia for that.

Here in Spain for example we have an autonomous region called Teruel which happens to be one of the most uninhabited regions in all of Europe. Teruel has a small capital by the same name but 2/3rd of its population lives in 236 municipalities, of which more than half are villages of under 200 people.

Maybe we RooshV members should start a community there. I would be happy to help out on that end.

Here's more pertinent information:


From the article:

A good way to understand this measure is to look at Spain. It has a population density of 93 people per km², giving the impression of a sparsely populated country. This is borne out in the map, where much of Spain appears to be empty; much more so than any other large European country.

The reasons for this date back to Medieval times, as Daniel Oto-Peralías at the University of St Andrews has explained. Yet characterising Spain as a sparsely populated country does not reflect the experience on the ground – as anyone who knows Barcelona or Madrid can tell you.

Spain contains within it more than 505,000 1km squares. But only 13 per cent of them are lived in. This means that the “lived density” for Spain is in fact 737 people per km², rather than 93. So even though the settlement pattern appears sparse, people are actually quite tightly packed together.

In fact, Spain could claim to be the most densely populated major European country by this measure, despite its appearance on the map. This also helps explain why Spain has the most densely populated km² in Europe; more than 53,000 people inhabit a single 1km² area in Barcelona.

I could provide more background on that but in a nutshell it is mainly due to the embargo placed on the Franco regime by the United States as well as Europe. So Spain had to mostly grow its own food and produce its own energy.

Anyway, when you leave the populated regions you can quickly find yourself in completely uninhabited areas. A lot of that has become farmland of course but there are a ton of unpopulated areas left in Spain. When I take the AVE from Valencia to Madrid I see nothing but fields until arriving at the Atocha station. I mentioned Teruel above - well, the population density in that region is 9 people per square km. That's less than Finland!

So this gives me a lot of hope to find a place where I can hide out from the globalist take over. Maybe not forever but hey at this stage every day, every week, every month counts.
 

Kiwi

Pigeon
@NoFunInAus - thanks for posting this! Just by looking at the face in the first video I already knew this was in Russia or another slavic country.
This is how I plan to live in a year or two. Completely remote with nothing but my Starlink dish out front and solar panels on my roof. Maybe head into town once per month to buy some groceries and pick up all those online orders I placed the month before.

Self sufficiency, a more simpler life, no noise, very little stress, and a ton of nature surrounding you. Basically paradise.

I honestly believe that the key to the survival of our cultural heritage is to extract ourselves to inhospitable remote places. Regroup there and slowly build up our own communities with our own rules. This can be done anywhere, you don't have to go to Siberia for that.

Here in Spain for example we have an autonomous region called Teruel which happens to be one of the most uninhabited regions in all of Europe. Teruel has a small capital by the same name but 2/3rd of its population lives in 236 municipalities, of which more than half are villages of under 200 people.

Maybe we RooshV members should start a community there. I would be happy to help out on that end.

I'd go purely just for the Spanish food!

Does sound and look like paradise in those videos.
 

aynrus

Pelican
So the State of Tennessee is clearly having a victory over dog muzzles.

A week ago, the governor banned the counties (there're over 90 of them) from imposing local mask mandates, via his executive order, which said the "emergency" is over, zip. Several counties with biggest cities were given until end of May to wrap it up.

I've been to a couple of large chain stores in rural TN, one of them had been aggressive at promoting hoax nonsense and had the highest mask compliance earlier. There used to be 97-99% in muzzles just a month ago in these stores. Today, most were without them, may be 10% were still muzzled. Now the muzzled looked unusual. There was dancy music played outside in store parking lots and festive atmosphere.
Seems like people don't really believe in the Hoax but just obediently follow the orders.
 
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