European Paganism and their Modern Day LARPer's

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I had always meant to watch the documentary about him. Wow! The guy gets into all sorts of trouble, spends fifteen years in prison, and yet still finds himself a French woman to have six kids with! Lol
She's also big into the European identity/dissident right scene so it's no surprise. Varg has high status within that subculture and we all know how women feel about high status men - if it's just status within a niche.
 

y2k

Sparrow
They are remnants of the Ancestral religion of Adam. Which was still present in primitive tribes around the world:

The Sky Father deities are the least distorted notions of God the Father. Although there are varying degrees of distortion however it seems the more primitive Steppe Peoples preserve the original worship better than the settled Civilizations.

Hence Dyeus Pater the All-Father for the Indo-Europeans and Tengri the Father God of the Blue Sky is more indicative of their preservation of the Original Religion.

There is a narrative of religion in the Islam, that the original religion of Mankind was that of Monotheism, and that over time men added gods (such as heroes representing virtues) to it, changing it from the true natural monotheism to artificial polytheism.

The Arabs of Mecca were upon the Monotheism of Abraham and Ishmael (pbut) until a man called Amr bin Luhayy brought idols with him from the north, the Levant. He saw there literature, architecture and the practice of polytheism. He was impressed and brought polytheism back with him to Mecca, and convinced the people to worship an idol he brought. This faced little resistance and the number of idols worshiped grew to around 360 by the 6th century CE.

Shirk - The Arabic term for worshiping other than God (lit. Association, compare Hebrew "Shituf"), it is the worst sin man can commit


There is more information on Islam in the datasheet thread and links to videos.

Merciful Servant has many well edited videos with Muslim lecturers.
 

infowarrior1

Hummingbird
There is a narrative of religion in the Islam, that the original religion of Mankind was that of Monotheism, and that over time men added gods (such as heroes representing virtues) to it, changing it from the true natural monotheism to artificial polytheism.

The Arabs of Mecca were upon the Monotheism of Abraham and Ishmael (pbut) until a man called Amr bin Luhayy brought idols with him from the north, the Levant. He saw there literature, architecture and the practice of polytheism. He was impressed and brought polytheism back with him to Mecca, and convinced the people to worship an idol he brought. This faced little resistance and the number of idols worshiped grew to around 360 by the 6th century CE.

Shirk - The Arabic term for worshiping other than God (lit. Association, compare Hebrew "Shituf"), it is the worst sin man can commit


There is more information on Islam in the datasheet thread and links to videos.

Merciful Servant has many well edited videos with Muslim lecturers.
Interesting history. But not interested.
 

Easy_C

Crow
There is a narrative of religion in the Islam, that the original religion of Mankind was that of Monotheism, and that over time men added gods (such as heroes representing virtues) to it, changing it from the true natural monotheism to artificial polytheism.

Islam is an interesting case because the name of “Allah” appears in Sumerian lore as the individual who led the Egigi slave race in a rebellion against the god Enlil, which led to the creation of a second slave race (man) to take their place.
 
Both the Roman and Jewish authorities tried to eliminate the early Christian Church so it would make no sense for them to create a subversive movement then try to keep it from spreading. If anything they would fan the flames.
The Alt Right Pagan Larpers lack basic understanding about theology and its history. They also leave out famously how Christians helped with kicking out Jews in over a hundred countries, and various Christian scholars, most famously Martin Luther wrote about how synagogues and copies of the Talmud should be burned.
 
I think of some pagan gods, such as Molech, Chemosh, Pan, Kali, and the Mayan and Aztec gods as aspects of Satan. Others like Thor and Dyáuṣ Pitṛ́ (the Vedic sky father) I think of as simply non-existent but inspiring fictional characters.

Most likely Thor and Odin were real people made into gods.

This was the belief of the two main norse chroniclers Snorri Sturluson and Saxo Grammaticus and they were both devout christians.

If norse paganism was really evil and demonic, then those two christian chroniclers would not have written them down.

Unlike what Varg thinks though, I don't think there is any evidence that the christening of the germanic people was particularly violent or oppressive. The gods were already considered rather bad company and the worship of them the domain of witches and womenly men.
 
Most likely Thor and Odin were real people made into gods.

This was the belief of the two main norse chroniclers Snorri Sturluson and Saxo Grammaticus and they were both devout christians.

If norse paganism was really evil and demonic, then those two christian chroniclers would not have written them down.

Unlike what Varg thinks though, I don't think there is any evidence that the christening of the germanic people was particularly violent or oppressive. The gods were already considered rather bad company and the worship of them the domain of witches and womenly men.


Asha Logos has a recent excerpt about this I believe in his subverted history series.


 

bucky

Ostrich
Most likely Thor and Odin were real people made into gods.

This was the belief of the two main norse chroniclers Snorri Sturluson and Saxo Grammaticus and they were both devout christians.

If norse paganism was really evil and demonic, then those two christian chroniclers would not have written them down.

Unlike what Varg thinks though, I don't think there is any evidence that the christening of the germanic people was particularly violent or oppressive. The gods were already considered rather bad company and the worship of them the domain of witches and womenly men.
I'd agree that mist European pagans eventually voluntarily converted to Christianity. That wasn't always the case, of course. Charlemagne famously massacred about 5k pagan hold outs who refused to convert, and iirc there's evidence for bitter and bloody religious wars between Christians and pagans in early Anglo-Saxon England.

Where did you get your info about the worship of the Norse gods being considered for women and unmanly men? I'd be interested to know more.
 
NeoPaganism is just a baby boomer version of making up your own religion. As we all know there are no sacred texts like the vedas, gita, bible or koran. Yes there are some myths and stories but no true connection to the past. These myths can be important for exploring our humanity but they simply cannot stand on their own or provide any insight about the care of our souls.

We do know that the larping type Neo-Norse pagans do avoid the one tangible ritual pagans practiced that we know of. Human Sacrifice. I confronted one of these 'neo druids' about this once and his reply was essentially 'hey man, I don't have to follow that'. Then what do you have to follow? What you make up?
 
Where did you get your info about the worship of the Norse gods being considered for women and unmanly men? I'd be interested to know more.

One story, I've mentioned before is the story of Ottar from the Edda, in which a young man Ottar has his land taken by someone else, who claims they have inheritance to it. Ottar being an orphan has no pedigree and thus is a no one in norse society. Ottar worships Freya piously and asks her for help to get his land back. She agrees to help, but turns him into a pig, who she rides to see a seeres who tells Ottar of his ancestors. With that knowledge, Ottar can get his land back.

This is a very interesting story, because it shows that though the gods are mighty and answer to worship, it is still humiliating to need their help. Ottar is literally turned into a pig to be ridden by Freya.

And for what?

Had he know his ancestors, he would never have needed it.

I read that story as saying, best not to need the gods, cause you might not like what they give you.
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
There's this book called Lords of Chaos that discussed some interesting tidbits about Odin. The book's main focus isn't on Norse mythology - rather it's on the black metal scene, mostly on the Norwegian scene. However, Norse mythology has always been very influential on prominent members of that scene, with Varg Vikernens of Thulean Perspective fame being the most well known which means that the book looks into the lore in order to understand why these black metallers have the world views they do.

On page 212:
His early worship demanded the sacrifice of innocent men. Odin is often referred to as an great "stirrer of strige."

On the same page, a quote from a "comparative mythologist" named Georges Dumezil:

The character of Odin is complex and not very reassuring. His face hidden under his hood, in his somber blue cloak, he goes out onto the world, simultaneously master and spy. It happens that he betrays his believers and proteges, and he sometimes seems to take pleasure in sowing the seeds of fatal discord...

The next page has this quote, taken from an essay on the word Warg by a Mary Gerstein

Odin differs ideologically from other Indo-European binder gods in his essential amorality; he delights in strife between kinsmen and urges men to break their vows.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Interesting verse I came across while reading Psalms last night:

"God standeth in the congregation of the mighty; he judgeth among the gods."
-Psalms 82:1 (KJV)

There's also that passage in 1 Corinthians 8:5-6 (also KJV here):

5 For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods many, and lords many,)
6 But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.

Almost as if the Bible's saying the pagan gods actually exist as entities of some sort. I've read that this was a common belief among early Christians, just that they considered them demons, although "among the gods" in the verse from Psalms does have a slightly different feel to it from the passage from Corinthians, almost as if whatever these "gods" among whom God judges aren't necessarily bad.

As an aside, I've been wondering how literally every statement David makes in Psalms about God and man's nature with Him is to be taken. There's a lot of very interesting, strange stuff in there.
 
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Interesting verse I came across while reading Psalms last night:

"God standeth in the congregation of the mighty; he judgeth among the gods."
-Psalms 82:1 (KJV)

There's also that passage in 1 Corinthians 8:5-6 (also KJV here):

5 For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods many, and lords many,)
6 But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.

Almost as if the Bible's saying the pagan gods actually exist as entities of some sort. I've read that this was a common belief among early Christians, just that they considered them demons, although "among the gods" in the verse from Psalms does have a slightly different feel to it from the passage from Corinthians, almost as if whatever these "gods" among whom God judges aren't necessarily bad.

As an aside, I've been wondering how literally every statement David makes in Psalms about God and man's nature with Him is to be taken. There's a lot of very interesting, strange stuff in there.

The early Hebrews believed in the existence of other gods, but that Yahweh was superior to all others, so that passage from Psalms makes sense in that context. Even more so if you look at the DRB version:

God hath stood in the congregation of gods: and being in the midst of them he judgeth gods.

There's also a lot references in the OT to the Hebrews worshiping other gods.

Looking at Corinthians, I take that to mean there are other entities which people call gods, but to the Christians there is only one god.
 
Almost as if the Bible's saying the pagan gods actually exist as entities of some sort. I've read that this was a common belief among early Christians, just that they considered them demons, although "among the gods" in the verse from Psalms does have a slightly different feel to it from the passage from Corinthians, almost as if whatever these "gods" among whom God judges aren't necessarily bad.

Cantate Domino comes right out with it: they're "idols" in MT translations and "devils" in LXX translations.
"As for all the gods of the heathen, they are but idols; but it is the LORD that made the heavens." (Psalm 96:5, Coverdale)
"For all the gods of the Gentiles are devils: but the Lord made the heavens." (Psalm 95:5, Douay Rheims Challoner Version)

As an aside, I've been wondering how literally every statement David makes in Psalms about God and man's nature with Him is to be taken. There's a lot of very interesting, strange stuff in there.

You might like Christ in the Psalms by Fr. Patrick Reardon. He explains the drama aspect, and comments on each psalm. The Neale commentary is even better, with verse by verse commentary from the Church Fathers so that you can find explanations for exactly what you've got questions about. Lancelot Andrewes Press sells it, but you can also get it on the internet archive, volume 1 here.
 

infowarrior1

Hummingbird
Interesting verse I came across while reading Psalms last night:

"God standeth in the congregation of the mighty; he judgeth among the gods."
-Psalms 82:1 (KJV)

There's also that passage in 1 Corinthians 8:5-6 (also KJV here):

5 For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods many, and lords many,)
6 But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.

Almost as if the Bible's saying the pagan gods actually exist as entities of some sort. I've read that this was a common belief among early Christians, just that they considered them demons, although "among the gods" in the verse from Psalms does have a slightly different feel to it from the passage from Corinthians, almost as if whatever these "gods" among whom God judges aren't necessarily bad.

As an aside, I've been wondering how literally every statement David makes in Psalms about God and man's nature with Him is to be taken. There's a lot of very interesting, strange stuff in there.

The Nations have been handed over to ruling Spirits ever since Adam's Fall:

Those Angelic Beings are the "God's" of all the various Human Nations. Supernatural Powers in regards to the worship of the various God's is from those Beings and their servants and of course they ultimately serve under Satan. As the Top Ranking Officials of God's Ruling Body they also serve as the Top Officers in his Kingdom serving as "Princes" over the various Nations(Daniel 10:12,10:20)

They probably are incapable of original thought but makes use of existing human culture and suit themselves. Hence the repeated cultural manifestations of evil that seem identical across the globe.

Even as they are Rebels. Since Mankind are themselves sinners. They are permitted to Judicially curse and wreak havoc on the Humans as part of their Judicial responsibilities. Deception and Falsehood are forms of Judgment. As are the ruination of Human Nations in Judgment for Sin as a result of the exarcerbation of Human Evil by those same Angels.

Keeping Humans into a destructive Cycle. Evident with the Rise and Fall of all Mankind's Civilizations in history. Only Jesus Christ's Entrance would not only convict them and evict them from their positions of power over Mankind and the Cosmos. As killing Jesus is actually killing someone that is actually innocent.

But Jesus as the New Adam has the Legal Right along with Redeemed Mankind to rule once again over a Redeemed Cosmos.

www.christian-thinktank.com/victor.pdf
 
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infowarrior1

Hummingbird
 
Has anyone dealt with the Nietzsche argument that Christianity was a Jewish slavery placed onto European culture (Romans) which ultimately created a weak mentality and led to its' downfall and now our enslavement to them? I've tried to counter this with E Michael Jones arguments - that Talmudic Judaism is a religion more so than a race. Also I have re iterated that inheriting this type of mentality would make us just like them, and this is why Christians should seek a better path.

The crux of the problem as I see it, is that people want to "choose a God", a God that suits them, and their beliefs. Rather we must accept God for who he is. God isn't here to save the european race or heritage as difficult as that is for some to understand. God made the nations and they will be here until the end of time. We don't encourage race mixing, we know that it is being pushed in the culture by those who wish to subvert us, but a marriage between Christians of different ethnicity is fine, although with some added friction.

I can't make Christianity a white religion for this person, but it is intrinsically more respectful of ethnicity, history, family lineage than what we see today. I think what pagans in many cases ultimately want is to just make white their religion.
This reminds me of the old website, "Stuff White People Like". Listed at #2 is this.
********************************************************************

#2 Religions that their parents don’t belong to
White people will often say they are “spiritual” but not religious. Which usually means that they will believe any religion that doesn’t involve Jesus.

Popular choices include Buddhism, Hinduism, Kabbalah and, to a lesser extent, Scientology. A few even dip into Islam, but it’s much more rare since you have to give stuff up and actually go to Mosque.

Mostly they are into religion that fits really well into their homes or wardrobe and doesn’t require them to do very much.
 
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