Extreme fatigue in the morning...

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Does anybody else suffer from extreme fatigue upon waking up? I would love to wake up at 6am and pray, do exercise, make breakfast etc before work but no matter how hard I try, I just can't seem to do it.

If so, has anything helped you? Supplements? More sleep?
 

Kitty Tantrum

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
Wake up at 4 instead.

That's the only thing that works for me. I can't just wake an hour or two early, and accomplish a normal hour or two of additional activity. I also need to allot a roughly equal amount of time for additional waking-up. Assuming I normally wake up around 8:00 most mornings -

If I'm out of bed at 6:00, I'll be awake by 7:00 or so.

But if I want to be AWAKE by 6:00, I have to get out of bed by about 4:00.

If I were to wake up an hour early at 7, I'd spend most of the "extra" hour just sitting and sleepy-thinking while putting my socks on.
 

KiwiInBudapest

Robin
Protestant
These are the three things that have made the biggest impact in my life in terms of waking up with more energy:


1. Buy an air purifier.
People don't believe me when I tell them but I've shortened the amount of sleep I need with this thing (I have a Xiaomi Mi Air 2s but similair kinds should work as well). But actually, don't just take my word for it when there's science on it:

A 2015 study tested the impact of bedroom ventilation through two experiments, with one using an open window and the other using a fan. The fan would turn on when CO2 levels exceeded a certain amount (thus signaling a need for more oxygen). The study found that lower CO2 levels — which can be due to open windows or fans — resulted in increased perceived freshness of bedroom air, as well as an improved ability to concentrate and perform the next day.

Depending on where you live I'd get a humidifier to get that at perfect levels as well. It has made an impact too but only during the winters here when it gets too dry.

2. Install f.lux on your laptop or mobile phone that blocks blue light which affects sleep.

You can install and read about it here: https://justgetflux.com

3. Become a strict nose breather if you aren't already.

There's a lot of science on this too but I'd recommend Patrick McKeown's website (who is the biggest guru in this field), if you're interested in reading more. He's got some exercises etc. on there

 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Wake up at 4 instead.

That's the only thing that works for me. I can't just wake an hour or two early, and accomplish a normal hour or two of additional activity. I also need to allot a roughly equal amount of time for additional waking-up. Assuming I normally wake up around 8:00 most mornings -

If I'm out of bed at 6:00, I'll be awake by 7:00 or so.

But if I want to be AWAKE by 6:00, I have to get out of bed by about 4:00.

If I were to wake up an hour early at 7, I'd spend most of the "extra" hour just sitting and sleepy-thinking while putting my socks on.
What time would you be going to bed to wake at 4?
 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
These are the three things that have made the biggest impact in my life in terms of waking up with more energy:


1. Buy an air purifier.
People don't believe me when I tell them but I've shortened the amount of sleep I need with this thing (I have a Xiaomi Mi Air 2s but similair kinds should work as well). But actually, don't just take my word for it when there's science on it:



Depending on where you live I'd get a humidifier to get that at perfect levels as well. It has made an impact too but only during the winters here when it gets too dry.

2. Install f.lux on your laptop or mobile phone that blocks blue light which affects sleep.

You can install and read about it here: https://justgetflux.com

3. Become a strict nose breather if you aren't already.

There's a lot of science on this too but I'd recommend Patrick McKeown's website (who is the biggest guru in this field), if you're interested in reading more. He's got some exercises etc. on there

Good advice, I have been thinking to get a purifier. Did you do much research on the Xiaomi Mi Air 2s, or are they all the same? There are so many options.

My breathing is probably horrible. I'm quite anxious so tend to just do do do and go go without paying attention to breathing. Thanks for this!
 

KiwiInBudapest

Robin
Protestant
Good advice, I have been thinking to get a purifier. Did you do much research on the Xiaomi Mi Air 2s, or are they all the same? There are so many options.

My breathing is probably horrible. I'm quite anxious so tend to just do do do and go go without paying attention to breathing. Thanks for this!

The air purifiers are not all the same. You want one with a pretty decent filter that isn't too loud and one that isn't so weak that it doesn't fully purify the air in the room. Youtube is your friend if you're gonna look in to this.

But yeah, I'm a tech geek so I did a bit of research and that model is a good and convenient one (everything from Xiaomi is to be honest). You can control it with an app and get some interesting data on temperature, humidity and air quality and since it sensors the air quality it can adjust the speed of the fan by itself. And if you have pollen too, it's a must buy, I would say.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
Extreme fatigue or not wanting to get up was tied to emotional upset for me (don't want to face the world, just stay in bed) and not getting "restful" sleep. I also had bouts of night terrors and nightmares in my early 20s.

I work evenings so sometimes I'm still "on" when I come home late, but I sleep fairly well now as long as there isn't a toddler starfishing, laughing, or putting his tiny foot in my face in the middle of the night. (I'm also having some bad pain/nerve issues that have good days and bad days. The nights can get bad.)

Melatonin helps sometimes but it gives some people weird dreams
(by some people I mean me). I also shower and read.

It may help to have a motivator to get out of bed, like your favorite coffee or tea or something you really want to do. Sometimes you just have to force yourself until it sticks.

Hope you feel better!
 
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Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
We actually use air purifiers in our house (@KiwiInBudapest) regularly since the air has become so bad here. We use Medify Airx with a HEPA filter for the main rooms and Koios “desktop” air purifiers for the bedrooms. These worked great during all the wild fires when outside looked like Mars and we’ve continued to use them when we can’t keep the windows open or the air is bad outside. Both of these are also very quiet with timers and no blinky lights.

As to waking up refreshed at an early time, I would suggest creating a bedtime routine. I get up everyday at 6am easily, sometimes earlier, and these are some of the things I do (maybe they will help you get a good night’s sleep and wake up refreshed too):
- Get sunlight and physical activity during the day. (Very important, double points if they’re both done at the same time)
- Don’t nap during the day.
- Be sober (obviously). Sometimes people think alcohol will help them sleep (not saying you do) but it does not. It might help a person fall asleep but it will be a restless shallow sleep.
- Have a neutral stomach. Don’t be too full or too hungry.
- If you want to wake up at 6am then you should be actually, literally, asleep by 10pm the night before to get a full eight hours (although some say seven hours are good too).
- Be physically in bed an hour before you want to fall asleep (so about 9pm), washed up and in jammies. This where you start your bedtime routine: read a book (no electronics), listen to calming music, use aromatherapy, etc. You can do whatever makes you feel relaxed. Take this time to think about all the things you need to think about. Say some extra prayers (Jesus Prayer, Our Father’s, and Hail Mary’s).

Also, sleep is cumulative. If you’re sleep deprived, you might actually need to go to bed earlier than 10pm for a while until you catch up on your rest. And, just to say again, having good physical activity and sunlight during the day will help give you a good, deep, night’s sleep so you can wake up early, ideally at daybreak, feeling refreshed.

You’re trying to shift your sleep pattern which can seem like a tiring task (nyuk nyuk :p) but stick with it. “Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.”
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I don't snore, get to bed at about midnight, wake up at 8:30.
This is the problem.
Try waking and sleeping with the sun (as humans did for 99% of our history) for a week, and see how you feel.
Under the terrible daylight savings time system, you might be going to bed at 6PM, but just ignore the physical clock and rise and set with the sun, and see how you feel.

I'm often tired until I reset to this system several times a year. Remember ole Ben Franklin's adage:
Early to bed
Early to rise
Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise

Historically, people went to bed far earlier than midnight. There was actually a philosophy around the founding fathers era that one should be *waking* at midnight to take care of things, and then having a second sleep. Whether or not that works, they were getting to bed around 6 in the afternoon to make that possible.


Edit: The recommendation for Melatonin is a good idea if you have trouble pushing your sleep 6 hours earlier than your current habit. It's a natural hormone that is related to your circadian clock (which tells you to sleep when it is dark and wake when it's light). Its a common supplement and can be found at most groceries or health food stores.
 

Arby

Pigeon
Woman
Atheist
A good diet really helps - for me that's low carb, animal based. Getting high amounts of B vitamins helps, though if you supplement you have to watch out to get the correct forms. Going to bad early of course, so you still get the same 8.5 hours of sleep you get now. Give it time, you will experience "jetlag" first.
Also consider cutting out all caffeine for two months or so (although improvements should be visible after three weeks). Coffee (even decaf), tea, chocolate, all of it. Caffeine can disturb your sleep, especially the deep sleep phase, which obviously doesn't allow for sufficiently restful sleep.
If the tiredness is due to low level inflammation, red light therapy might help (LLLT, low level laser therapy), but the devices are pricey. It's basically early morning sun exposure on steroids, I haven't personally tried it but heard very, very positive things about it.

And then, finally, consider that this is just your innate biological clock. I have a fairly easy time going to bed and getting up whenever I want, but my daughter has a very set inner clock. She goes to bed at ten-ish and wakes at around eight, no matter how much I try changing it. In fact, if I do manage to get her to bed earlier, she doesn't sleep well at all, wakes a lot more often and ends up being tired all day.
 

Celibate Warrior21

Pigeon
Other Christian
It could be several factors ranging from lifestyle, diet and exercise.

I highly recommend a diet of abundant fruits, lay off the carbs and sugar. Lay off/cut down the stress in your life and get plenty of exercise.

If you're too lazy to exercise, try doing some flexibility and stretching exercises, it could help give you a boost the following day.
 
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