Farming Thread

William Faulkner

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Does anyone have any tips on getting rid of flies besides the obvious things one would find at a tractor supply store? Now that the warm temps have arrived they have become a problem. We've never had any issues with flies before in the past.
 

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
I might buy a 2011 MF 1839, which is the generation before the 1840.

Not sure why, I just can't keep my mind off of buying a small square baler lately. I suppose that's a sign I should buy one, life is short. The squares get my nephews working and they move alot faster to the homesteaders.

Hay season is coming soon.

I picked up the baler. Now I've got to make sure my labour force of teenagers doesn't flake out. MF1839_2011a.jpg
 

john_Jea

Robin
Other Christian
I've talked to some dairy and beef farmers and things are bad. Dairy farms can live off government subsidies but beef doesn't pay for it's own feed anymore. Doesn't pay for it's feed! That's not considering labor, taxes, housing etc. Ironically the only farms that are selling beef for a profit are those who practice regenerative grazing.

At the same time national food security is the trendy topic of today.
 

Frussell

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
This is an awesome thread! My wife and I are going to be buying some property with 5-10 acres and begin our homestead. My grandfather was a farmer (studied to be a pharmacist but decided to farm instead) I've been in an office type sales position where the goal is to make as much money as possible and it's weighed heavy on my soul for years. I'm not materialistic and never have been, working in that environment was draining. I recently retired from that profession, can't do it anymore. I'll make a lot less money (probably none first year) and work harder than I ever have in my life but this is something I've had in mind to do since I was 16 years old. I like the idea of a food forest for part of the property ala David the Good (SW Florida, very hot and humid, no winter to speak of) and corn, sweet and regular potatoes, true yams, and putting as many assorted rare/exotic plants in as I can to determine what grows well and what doesn't so I'll have an idea of what NOT to plant the next year. Also goats for milk/cheese/meat, chickens, a pond with ducks, fish, aquatic plants, a few beehives, etc. I'm going to try to be as natural and organic as I can, the soil (sand) is horrible here, I want to try Steve Solomon's remineralization for that problem, anyone here ever had experience using this technique? And if anyone has recommendations for resources a beginner would find helpful? I've been voraciously reading and watching videos, gardening when I can (no comparison to having a farm). Any advice would be appreciated!
 
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john_Jea

Robin
Other Christian
I'm going to try to be as natural and organic as I can, the soil (sand) is horrible here, I want to try Steve Solomon's remineralization for that problem, anyone here ever had experience using this technique? And if anyone has recommendations for resources a beginner would find helpful?
Is your soil hard and/or bare?

I like Alan Savory's work, he has done amazing things in Africa with reversing desertification and reclaiming grass planes. Joel Salatin is also great, I think he is in Virginia. The practical stuff is best learned from the locals, they could also save you some time and effort by telling you what grows in your area and what doesn't.
 

Frussell

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Is your soil hard and/or bare?

I like Alan Savory's work, he has done amazing things in Africa with reversing desertification and reclaiming grass planes. Joel Salatin is also great, I think he is in Virginia. The practical stuff is best learned from the locals, they could also save you some time and effort by telling you what grows in your area and what doesn't.
It is sandy and lacking in almost everything but calcium. areas are bare and others have grass, it's a mish mash. I'm in zone 9b
 

john_Jea

Robin
Other Christian
It is sandy and lacking in almost everything but calcium. areas are bare and others have grass, it's a mish mash. I'm in zone 9b
The easiest and cheapest way to start off would be to get some weed seeds or perhaps some legumes seeds that can spread into the dead spots and get some life into the soil. There are probably some known plants that are used in your climate to counter erosion. There is a risk that it can take over the growth that is already present or spread over to your neighbors land, the goats could keep the growth limited if you manage the grazing correctly.
 

Frussell

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
The easiest and cheapest way to start off would be to get some weed seeds or perhaps some legumes seeds that can spread into the dead spots and get some life into the soil. There are probably some known plants that are used in your climate to counter erosion. There is a risk that it can take over the growth that is already present or spread over to your neighbors land, the goats could keep the growth limited if you manage the grazing correctly.
Thank you for the advice. I was planning on a large scale cover crop of crimson clover, rye, and legumes as my starting point. In your experience do you know if these are plants that would easily overtake? And great idea about asking locals. I've been reading and watching David the good as he was born and raised in South Florida and has great ideas on planting indigenous species as well as following the equator in relation to your position and researching the crops grown in other countries in the same zone. What's your opinion on drip irrigation? There are some heavy drinkers I plan to plant, bananas need about twice the water than what yearly rainfall provides.
 
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john_Jea

Robin
Other Christian
Thank you for the advice. I was planning on a large scale cover crop of crimson clover, rye, and legumes as my starting point. In your experience do you know if these are plants that would easily overtake? And great idea about asking locals. I've been reading and watching David the good as he was born and raised in South Florida and has great ideas on planting indigenous species as well as following the equator in relation to your position and researching the crops grown in other countries in the same zone. What's your opinion on drip irrigation? There are some heavy drinkers I plan to plant, bananas need about twice the water than what yearly rainfall provides.
I'm pretty much in the opposite climate to yours so I have no idea what would work for you, the principal is the same. I would research what is safe for the goats to eat, some legumes can be poisonous if eaten exclusively.

I'm interested in drip irrigation but have no experience with it, might try it this summer. Keep in mind that the higher you get the % of biological matter in the soil the more water it can hold.
 

BasilSeal

Kingfisher
Catholic
Gold Member
A salmonella outbreak! Due to backyard poultry! Let's just think that one through.

How many people are exposed in this outbreak? Well, let's see that would be Paw, Maw, Jane, Tommy, and neighbor Sue we gave a dozen eggs to.

Then you need to think about all those people who might contract Salmonella in any given year from person-to-person contact with someone who has a salmonellosis infection. Which is, well, pretty much zero additional people! Person-to-person transmission of salmonellosis is extremely unlikely. Well, unless of course...

Sexual activities that expose you to fecal bacteria, such as anal sex, can make you vulnerable to contracting the bacteria.
This from: https://www.healthline.com/health/is-salmonella-contagious#person-to-person

But that's just an aside. So what is it about? Chicken raising is a warning sign of independence; this is a precursor for even more strict federal legislation that goes beyond strict local ordinances with a goal of putting an end to this unregulated and dangerous activity within our peaceful law abiding communities.
 
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