Farming Thread

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Spectrumwalker said:
Tex Cruise said:
They might be hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands of years old. It's incredible to find and hold a well worn grinding stone or axe, being the first person to pick it up in who knows?
So awesome.

I was out discing a hay field one time and as I'm passing the row I just did I look over and see something sharp poking up out of the ground. Lucky it didn't pinch the tire. But I go grab it and it's an old hay hook. You could tell it was hand made, probably at least 100 years old. At the end of the day I stood there holding this thing; looking out at the field and got this surreal ghostly connection to the past envisioning the guys of old doing the same thing I was more or less but all by hand and horse. Some guy was out there picking up small square bales by hand and loading em onto a wagon, dropped his hook and there it remained ever since. You think about all the history and events that went by as things like this just sat there in the ground as the world turns until you dug it up. I could just hear some ole boy saying "ah shit where'd my hook go?" I use it as a coat hook in my camper.
I found an old rusty glob of something last summer. After chipping away at it for an hour a pick axe started to take shape. I cleaned it up and underneath was the most pitted and rusted old looking pick axe I ever seen.

I ground it down as a side project. It took many hours and in the end there was no way to get all the pitting out without losing most of the steel. So I just polished it up and hung it on the wall.

Like you, I thought back to the Fraser gold rush and how many boats full of men were coming up the river here. That my farm must have had small tent villages of guys gathering supplies for the trip up river. Its a great day dream.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
^^^ Great stories guys. I was actually walking the farm with my brother the other day. We might get some things pulled out for scrap to clean things up a little. It was a funny process, alot of stuff you really doubt you will use, but it still feels like it has value just because of the legacy and the history of the prior generations. We're clearing out the no brainer stuff but holding onto a lot of it. Might come in handy once I get my welding skills up to par.

On another note, Covid-19 has been impacting Farming. I heard of a dairy farmer around here dumping milk recently. Local vegetable farmers were having trouble bringing in their foreign workers, there are quarantine measures which will be pretty complicated. 14 days back in their country, than 14 days upon arrival. Replacing with locals wouldn't work because they would make more collecting the government corona cheque than working on a farm. But he was/is still considering bringing in some locals. Just wondering if anyone has seen any local impacts or things that are shaping up differently this year?

Also, someone put me on to a youtuber who ties some of what is happening in farming to the whole UN , Agenda 2030 Bill Gates, Eat Bugs stuff. Pretty messed up stuff. They are actually trying to get farmeres to shut down so they can take over the food supply.

Supply Chains are getting wrecked as restaurants shut down also.

 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Well boys,

Tonight, I am thinking about starting a big ass garden in a 1.25 acre front field on my farm.

Given all the changes in the last month, it seems like a smart idea. I'm sure there will be people who will take delivery of local fresh produce.

I have a couple brothers and a couple friends with teenage kids who could work the field and try to sell what we grow since they aren't really allowed to work.

Right now I'm a blank slate. I'll till up the field and have it fertilized with everything else. Then just leave it to play around with. I'll have to think whether I should sow grass in there, just to keep the weeds down, and till up where I put the veggies in, or just manage the entire field.

[attachment=43498]
 

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NoMoreTO

Ostrich
How to grow Potatoes in the backyard in the city.

Might be a good time to use up some of that excess energy guys and get a few buckets of potatoes going.

 

Brother Abdul Majeed

Kingfisher
Gold Member
NoMoreTO said:
Well boys,

Tonight, I am thinking about starting a big ass garden in a 1.25 acre front field on my farm.

Given all the changes in the last month, it seems like a smart idea. I'm sure there will be people who will take delivery of local fresh produce.

I have a couple brothers and a couple friends with teenage kids who could work the field and try to sell what we grow since they aren't really allowed to work.

Right now I'm a blank slate. I'll till up the field and have it fertilized with everything else. Then just leave it to play around with. I'll have to think whether I should sow grass in there, just to keep the weeds down, and till up where I put the veggies in, or just manage the entire field.
This guy claims to gross $350 g's a year selling the produce he grows on an acre and a half. He's very organized.

It's in upstate New York.

 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Brother Abdul Majeed said:
NoMoreTO said:
Well boys,

Tonight, I am thinking about starting a big ass garden in a 1.25 acre front field on my farm.

Given all the changes in the last month, it seems like a smart idea. I'm sure there will be people who will take delivery of local fresh produce.

I have a couple brothers and a couple friends with teenage kids who could work the field and try to sell what we grow since they aren't really allowed to work.

Right now I'm a blank slate. I'll till up the field and have it fertilized with everything else. Then just leave it to play around with. I'll have to think whether I should sow grass in there, just to keep the weeds down, and till up where I put the veggies in, or just manage the entire field.
This guy claims to gross $350 g's a year selling the produce he grows on an acre and a half. He's very organized.

It's in upstate New York.

Similar to the vertical greenhouse farming shown at the 23:00 minute mark of that video, I have toured one-hectare greenhouses with vertical farming and drip irrigation. You had to disinfect the bottoms of your shoes on a large soaked sponge before stepping through a double-door airlock-style entrance that dealt with any winged things. The vines of cucumbers, melons, and other vine crops stretched from the ground to the ceiling and back. Special harness bags supported the weight of the melons. It was impressive. With any luck, in the years ahead I may eventually re-invest some farm profit into such a greenhouse.

While mankind will never replace conventional farming, vertical farming, hydroponics, aquaponics, and other systems are the wave of the future. I recall doing some cursory research of home farming systems a while back. Those types of companies were just getting started back then. I see that a few companies are in production.

https://thespoon.tech/are-in-home-vertical-farms-the-next-big-appliance-for-connected-kitchens/
 

Johnnyvee

Pelican
NoMoreTO said:
I was looking at the following mix for my pasture. Its a custom seed guy, I can get a one time kick in for the government for restoring grassland, so I figured good to max out the legume. I was advised to sow some oats into it to keep the weeds down and sell it as a premium hay.

The Land will need to be tiled, so I have heard that Birdsfoot Trefoil is a legume which doesn't cause bloat in animals, and works well on poorly drained soils. (As opposed to Alfalfa)

Any thoughts?

35% BF Trefoil
5% Alsike Clover
20% Treasure Timothy
10% Palaton Reed Canary Grass
5% Kentucky Bluegrass
5% Devour Orchardgrass
5% Tetrasweet Perennial Ryegrass
15% Meadow Bromegrass

I will most likely go with a custom guy to plant it, given the timeframe and me not having a drill with a grass seed box its best to get it done right. With success I won't be doing this job on the regular, just frost seeding overtop.
I read through some of the study below doing some research on grazing habits of cattle, and they`re preferred plants. (when many species are available to them) It`s quite a technical and mundane read, but if you browse down to the; Results/Vegetation survey and plant selection section, there`s some interesting data on cattle plant species selection/preference. This was in a Swiss alpine pasture, but it`s probably still relevant.
https://www.agriculturejournals.cz/publicFiles/113337.pdf
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
Tail Gunner said:
Brother Abdul Majeed said:
NoMoreTO said:
Well boys,

Tonight, I am thinking about starting a big ass garden in a 1.25 acre front field on my farm.

Given all the changes in the last month, it seems like a smart idea. I'm sure there will be people who will take delivery of local fresh produce.

I have a couple brothers and a couple friends with teenage kids who could work the field and try to sell what we grow since they aren't really allowed to work.

Right now I'm a blank slate. I'll till up the field and have it fertilized with everything else. Then just leave it to play around with. I'll have to think whether I should sow grass in there, just to keep the weeds down, and till up where I put the veggies in, or just manage the entire field.
This guy claims to gross $350 g's a year selling the produce he grows on an acre and a half. He's very organized.

It's in upstate New York.

Similar to the vertical greenhouse farming shown at the 23:00 minute mark of that video, I have toured one-hectare greenhouses with vertical farming and drip irrigation. You had to disinfect the bottoms of your shoes on a large soaked sponge before stepping through a double-door airlock-style entrance that dealt with any winged things. The vines of cucumbers, melons, and other vine crops stretched from the ground to the ceiling and back. Special harness bags supported the weight of the melons. It was impressive. With any luck, in the years ahead I may eventually re-invest some farm profit into such a greenhouse.

While mankind will never replace conventional farming, vertical farming, hydroponics, aquaponics, and other systems are the wave of the future. I recall doing some cursory research of home farming systems a while back. Those types of companies were just getting started back then. I see that a few companies are in production.

https://thespoon.tech/are-in-home-vertical-farms-the-next-big-appliance-for-connected-kitchens/
Looking at what he has in the ground, I believe it, and I believe that his market is high end restaurants. I had an acquaintance that quit their regular job to run a small greenhouse that supplied high end restaurants in our tourist area.

No rich restaurants though, no $350k/acre.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Brother Abdul Majeed said:
NoMoreTO said:
Well boys,

Tonight, I am thinking about starting a big ass garden in a 1.25 acre front field on my farm.

Given all the changes in the last month, it seems like a smart idea. I'm sure there will be people who will take delivery of local fresh produce.

I have a couple brothers and a couple friends with teenage kids who could work the field and try to sell what we grow since they aren't really allowed to work.

Right now I'm a blank slate. I'll till up the field and have it fertilized with everything else. Then just leave it to play around with. I'll have to think whether I should sow grass in there, just to keep the weeds down, and till up where I put the veggies in, or just manage the entire field.
This guy claims to gross $350 g's a year selling the produce he grows on an acre and a half. He's very organized.

It's in upstate New York.

Thanks for this. I've actually seen this video. Pretty inspiring stuff. This year will probably be a low tech year for this 1.25 acres. I went and picked up a bunch of different types of seeds this morning and will almost just wing it this year and learn as I go. This year I'll see what I have luck with and what I don't, and try to adjust as I go.

I got some old tobacco planting trays out just filled them with some dirt from out in the field. I'll get everything started now and hopefully transplant out into the field in about a month once its a little warmer. I'm in the process of buying that farm, so the seller is still in the house til the end of may but I have access to the fields.

Because of the Covid019, I am local this spring/summer where I thought I would be on the road for work.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I was looking at buying this '96 Belarus from the guy I am buying the farm off of. He wants 8K CAD, its 55 Hp and leaks oil a little. Starts up decent.

Looking online most people were saying to avoid. I will probably take a pass as I'm looking more for something dependable and with a loader. I could just buy the loader. We will see, could be a good utility tractor. The guys are selling and they won't need the tractor.

These are old communist tractors haha. They're still building em. Story I've heard online is they are like herpes, once you got em they're yours for life!

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Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
A tractor is pretty useful, especially if it starts.

Most seem to just be used to pull things. But once in a while we have to give our landlord a call and he sends his son out here with the John Deere that has some loader forks on it. But mostly a tractor just pulls shit.

What do you need to load? My grandpa had all sorts of attachments for his Case tractors. Almost all of them designed and built by him. I remember he had a rear loader attachment. Might work for you too.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Laner said:
Most seem to just be used to pull things. But once in a while we have to give our landlord a call and he sends his son out here with the John Deere that has some loader forks on it. But mostly a tractor just pulls shit.
A family member has a large tractor at his place. He has various attachments. He uses it to dig, move rock, plow, pull things, knock down trees, etc. Last time I visited (during hunting season), he lifted the digging attachment high in the air, hung a deer from it, and gutted and skinned it. They are really useful, especially if you are clearing land. It was expensive, but he saved a ton of money doing many tasks himself when he built his home.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Tail Gunner said:
Laner said:
Most seem to just be used to pull things. But once in a while we have to give our landlord a call and he sends his son out here with the John Deere that has some loader forks on it. But mostly a tractor just pulls shit.
A family member has a large tractor at his place. He has various attachments. He uses it to dig, move rock, plow, pull things, knock down trees, etc. Last time I visited (during hunting season), he lifted the digging attachment high in the air, hung a deer from it, and gutted and skinned it. They are really useful, especially if you are clearing land. It was expensive, but he saved a ton of money doing many tasks himself when he built his home.
Oh I hear you, a farmall tractor is the business. But for the price having one old commie tractor is better than none at all.

However, you might be able to finance a farmall for a reasonable rate right now. From what I hear auctions are also picking up a lot of iron.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Laner said:
From what I hear auctions are also picking up a lot of iron.
I love auctions. I furnished most of my house with antique and vintage furniture (and decor) from auctions over the years. Much better than buying cheap particle board garbage or overpriced new stuff. I am not sure how auctions would work in a pandemic.

If you have cash, however, I am not sure an auction is required. People will begin unloading many items in the months ahead. Keep your eyes on ebay and Craigslist. Start pricing now, so you know a great deal when you see it.

BTW: My family member bought his farmall tractor used. He had to travel to another state to pick it up. He got a great deal, however.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Laner said:
A tractor is pretty useful, especially if it starts.

Most seem to just be used to pull things. But once in a while we have to give our landlord a call and he sends his son out here with the John Deere that has some loader forks on it. But mostly a tractor just pulls shit.

What do you need to load? My grandpa had all sorts of attachments for his Case tractors. Almost all of them designed and built by him. I remember he had a rear loader attachment. Might work for you too.
Apparently an Allied 595 Loader might fit.

Well there will be a big cleanup on the farm. Might need a backhoe at some point. Will probably need a post pounder. Theres gonna be a lot of dirt and junk to move around.

I'll probably have a big bale spear at some point.

My issue is that the tractor might be more trouble than its worth and maybe I could do it with one good machine.

If I can get a great price I might go with the Belarus. But the tractor was bought new by the guys' late father and I think there might be some emotional attachment.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Farm_Planting_2020-05-10.jpg

60 acre Crop is in!

I had a custom guy do all of the field prep.
- Plow
- Multiple Times over discing
- Spring tooth

Then he went ahead of me with big equipment, a 30 foot drill and put the oats in along with 10lbs / acre of the pasture mix grasses mixed into it.
I followed behind with my 10 foot brillion and dropped the other 10 lbs/acre and packed it. I liked the approach as we sort of hedged our bets.

Half of the land is a hard clay and half is sand, so we planted half then had to wait a couple days to put the clay in.

Overall it went well, not without a breakdown and an issue or two but very happy to have it all in. Now just hoping she grows.
 

Bolly

Pelican
I was thinking about this today. wanted to share on of my favorite tools for fixing fence. I think every man who has barb wire on his place otta own one of these. It's the called the Texas Fence Fixer. It's real handy for tightening loose or droopy wires. Ill post a video below but all you do you is hook on to the loose wire, compress the ends which tightens your wire, and hook the chain to keep tension. Take your new piece of wire, twist the ends onto the old wire. In the middle, the old and new wire will make a space where you just take your handle on your pinchers and twist it tight. Super handy. Way easier than using one of them butterfly stretchers meant for splicing broken wires. I've had two of them. Lost one but I've had mine now for four years still works fine. There's only one issue with them. The nuts have a habit of coming loose and if they come loose ya can't pinch onto the droopy wire. Both of mine have done this and another guy i know his did the same thing. But just replace it with some self locking nuts it'll be alright.

There's a caveat though. Can't find em at the moment. When i got my first one of these i was so impressed I was hoping the guy who invented this bought himself a penthouse in the Bahamas and retired. Maybe he did i dunno. Word on the street there's a changs in ownership and production. But should be back on the market soon. If you look on eBay and amazon you see a lot off bullshit knockoffs from China. Those are not legit and frankly i hope they do something about that. The real one is made in Texas.

But definately add this to your guy's toolboxes when it comes back on the market! Worth every penny.

Please forgive the Texas accents lol. It was the best vid i could find.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Jack of all trades comes in Handy in farm country. Llamas are mostly for fur, and cute factor - lots of chicks like them. I don't think anybody eats them other than maybe some Peruvians. I am looking at putting in some berry bushes and such in a front field, perhaps a few trees for a nursery. I've left myself a little over an acre to play around with. At first I was thinking all about a garden but now I am realizing I need some space eaters, and longer term stuff like berry bushes and a small nursery perhaps. My buddy knows how to tap maple trees so I might do a little of that with him just for fun. All these jack of all trades stuff adds up and some of it is just fun stuff to do around the farm.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I'm looking into building a 7 foot high tensile fence with electric, I've never done this before but there are lots of tools that go into it. It's a bit of a project.

I'll contract out the baling to a custom guy. When I add up all the equipment costs it's not justifiable at the moment.

Plus I need to decide what I do and what I contract out, so I'll focus on the fencing right now. I'm half budgeting for the job, fence pounder, posts, electric and at the same time working through the details of the job itself and all the little tools and details.
 
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