Farming Thread

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Scary changes in US Tax law being proposed by Biden. Retail small business has been slaughtered, is the plan to destroy multi generational farms next? If you watch ice age farmer or track UN Agenda 2030 the answer is an obvious yes. Plus, someone is going to have to pay for the massive debt being accumulated. I am up in Canada but have been telling my family the time for planning is now.

Capital gains tax on estates. First, a lesson on stepped-up basis. Stepped-up basis means if you bought land for $400,000 several years ago and it’s worth $2 million when you die, the basis when your kids get it is moved up to the value on the date of your death — so $2 million. That means nobody pays capital gains tax on it, even if a farming heir buys from nonfarming heirs. Stepped-up basis saves your heirs a ton in capital gains tax.
Let’s say you have $1 million worth of equipment and you’ve taken depreciation on it. Currently, your heir can re-depreciate that equipment, if you’ve planned carefully.

Biden has two features in his plan, and one is unfortunate, but the other is disastrous for farmers.

The unfortunate one is that he wants to eliminate stepped-up basis. That means the $400,000 in land that’s now worth $2 million can go to your kids, and so long as they don’t sell, it doesn’t hurt them. If they do sell, they’ll pay taxes. Plus, equipment inheritance can’t be re-depreciated.

The disastrous option, if we’re all interpreting this correctly, is that he would tax built-in gain through appreciation. So that $2 million in land would be taxed on your death as if it were being sold, and so would the equipment, even if it was depreciated to zero. The capital gains tax proposal would raise it to 39.6%, which means the tax on $2 million of land and $1 million of equipment would be around $1 million.

That would be a pretty devastating change for farmers, if Congress went along with it.

Biden Farm Death Tax

Lonesome lands article

“The great searcher of human hearts is my witness, that I have no wish, which aspires beyond the humble and happy lot of living and dying a private citizen on my own farm.”
— GEORGE WASHINGTON
 

ilostabet

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
The guy from the grocery store gave me a pomegranate the other day. Never tried it before but it's quite tasty. Anyway, can't let good fruit seeds go to waste, so I planted about 50 of them.

Turns out it has some significance in Christian symbolism:

«In the earliest incontrovertible appearance of Christ in a mosaic, a fourth-century floor mosaic from Hinton St Mary, Dorset, now in the British Museum, the bust of Christ and the chi rho are flanked by pomegranates.[74] Pomegranates continue to be a motif often found in Christian religious decoration. They are often woven into the fabric of vestments and liturgical hangings or wrought in metalwork. Pomegranates figure in many religious paintings by the likes of Sandro Botticelli and Leonardo da Vinci, often in the hands of the Virgin Mary or the infant Jesus. The fruit, broken or bursting open, is a symbol of the fullness of Jesus' suffering and resurrection.[71]

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, pomegranate seeds may be used in kolyva, a dish prepared for memorial services, as a symbol of the sweetness of the heavenly kingdom


Capture.JPG
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Spent the day selling small square bales out of my barn. Sold over 200 today.

There is a bit of a squeeze going on right now, supplies are pretty low. I sold y at reasonable prices. I am happy to clean my barn out and begin a new year. I've got about 80 bales left of what was 700.

All in all it was a good day for logos. A beautiful day after a long winter and a little variety from my home office job.

Hay_Stack2.jpg
 

Tex Cruise

Pelican
Would you consider it worthwhile for you after that in doing small squares again?

It depends on the area I think. Where I am I don't think they'd be worth the trouble, but somewhere nearer to smaller acreages for sure. a guy I know who lives closer to town bought an old small square baler last year and seemed to go ok selling them.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Would you consider it worthwhile for you after that in doing small squares again?

It depends on the area I think. Where I am I don't think they'd be worth the trouble, but somewhere nearer to smaller acreages for sure. a guy I know who lives closer to town bought an old small square baler last year and seemed to go ok selling them.
The bulk of my hay this year is round bales sold pretty much off the field.

I sell small squares for cash over the winter. There isn't really a ton of money in it, at least I haven't figured out how to make money on it totally.

Next year will be better, as I have connections with buyers somewhat established from this year. I will always make money sitting on my computer.

Overall I have enjoyed it, and I think selling the small squares gets you in touch with alot of homestead and hobby farm types.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
The bulk of my hay this year is round bales sold pretty much off the field.

I sell small squares for cash over the winter. There isn't really a ton of money in it, at least I haven't figured out how to make money on it totally.

Next year will be better, as I have connections with buyers somewhat established from this year. I will always make money sitting on my computer.

Overall I have enjoyed it, and I think selling the small squares gets you in touch with alot of homestead and hobby farm types.
I buy small bales to cover my garden in the winter.

The farmer down the road that sells them makes a good chunk of cash selling them to the stores in the city during Thanksgiving-Halloween times.

With the boom in home gardening this past year, selling them on marketplace as a garden mulch might be a good avenue.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I helped a local guy out to put his 9 acre field into hay.

Step 1 was to disc it up, to get a real smooth field we could have used a cultivator/harrow on the 3rd pass, but the weather was good so we went ahead and sowed it in after 2.5 passes with the disc.

Fertilizer was spread by the company I buy it from, after discing it up the first time.

It should turn out to be a decent little hay field. We sowed oats in as the cover to give the grass some shade while it establishes and to add some yield to first year hay.

Before Discing

photo_2021-03-26_19-46-17.jpg
Discing
Discing.jpgphoto_2021-04-17_01-48-52.jpg


Sowing
April2_Field_After_Gibbons.jpg

Alfalfa_brillion.jpg

^^ Alfalfa seed - it's pink because it's treated with fungicide etc etc, don't touch


All Done, planted and packed down.
April2_Planted.jpg
a
 
The guy from the grocery store gave me a pomegranate the other day. Never tried it before but it's quite tasty. Anyway, can't let good fruit seeds go to waste, so I planted about 50 of them.

Turns out it has some significance in Christian symbolism:
It goes at least as far back as the Mosaic law: in Exodus 28 God specifies that the high priest's vestments need to have pomegranates and golden bells embroidered around the hem.
 

00anon00

Chicken
I'm looking into getting some chickens, maybe 10. I have a little coupe for them in my barn. A mix of laying hens and a few meat birds.

Anyone have any experience with that?
Did you get the chickens? I saw a pretty ingenious chicken farming method on youtube recently. Just a cart (moved every few days by a tractor) that the chicks all congregate under naturally. No need for fencing, apparently.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Did you get the chickens? I saw a pretty ingenious chicken farming method on youtube recently. Just a cart (moved every few days by a tractor) that the chicks all congregate under naturally. No need for fencing, apparently.
Not yet. They are being incubated. A little behind schedule but that works because I'm a little behind schedule.

I'll have them as chicks first in the basement under a heat lamp.
 

aynrus

Pelican
'Free-land'

"The homestead was an area of public land in the West (usually 160 acres or 65 ha) granted to any US citizen willing to settle on and farm the land. The law (and those following it) required a three-step procedure: file an application, improve the land, and file for the patent (deed). Any citizen who had never taken up arms against the U.S. government (including freed slaves after the fourteenth amendment) and was at least 21 years old or the head of a household, could file an application to claim a federal land grant. Women were eligible. The occupant had to reside on the land for five years, and show evidence of having made improvements. The process had to be complete within seven years."

Long story short the west needed to be expanded and they needed an incentive to do so. Do I want National Forest's getting used, no, but there's a ton of Alaskan wilderness and Yukon which is still incredibly expensive. Certain states have different homestead laws; i.e. 'we'll make it cheaper for you if you're going to farm the land' or what not. But the main take away point here is that land is expensive, but those of us willing and able to homestead it or don't mind the wilderness shouldn't be restricted to buying it. Sounds kind of silly ok, but the fact of the matter is there's no incentive to farm because big business owns the agro industry, I mention all of this because were essentially slaves ok, this isn't the 'land of the free', our freedom is an illusion and limited to select amount of choices. The only real option to break this commie state which the U.S. has become is to allow for the individual to plot their land call it their own. Sure, the capitalist will just say, "You are free, why are you complaining?" - well, for one I'm not complaining, but generally speaking making an arbitrary measurement like money as equal to my entire humanity as the equivalent of 'freedom' is kind of ridiculous. Sure, I'm 'free' to save money, but it's really missing the point to think money = freedom and is 'everything'. Money is just another gatekeeper metric tool to keep you enslaved without revolting. Money intrinsically is more neutral in general, but it's also vastly overrated and there is an insane amount of weight put on money as if it actually matters when it doesn't.

The obvious precursor to this is how 'chaz' is making it's insane claims and while that whole experiment is a joke and farce the underlying issue is still relevant; i.e. your only as free as the capital you have. In other words if you don't have any money, you aint buying any land, hell, if you don't have any money obviously your off in lala-land, but the fact remains that the barrier to entry is still fairly steep and the society 'game' employed is pretty ridged. Anyways my whole point in bringing this up is I just want free-land because it's there and no one's doin' anything with it and I don't feel like I should have to pay to be perfectly honest.

You ever driven through the southwest U.S. or any of these places where there's not a city in site for miles and miles and miles? There is a TON of land ok, and obviously who wants to start building in the middle of a desert, but it's even true the more north you go,anyways I just don't think I should have to pay. Forget giving me a stimulus check, how about give me acres of land instead.

This is a complete pipedream regarding bringing Homestead act back.
These endless emply lands in the West have no water and they will not have any more water (unless they pipe it down from Great Lakes or Columbia river...which is not going to happen, this water is well-protected), there realistically won't be more farming and only very little development on these lands. Every drop of water is counted and allotted in the West, and in some states each drop is actually owned by someone, including rain water (water rights, these are not riparian law states). There's barely water to support the existing population and agriculture there and many aquifers are strained. This is the exact reason for sparse population.

Small farming such as 165 acres is pretty much a hobby activity and only a loss of money in the US, 165K acres is most likely going to be a losing operation - especially in the drier area with poor soils, hard to get water, unless one grows weed (but no one is going to give free land for that). Also, investments to get the profitable farm going are enormous, even to break even, there're business plans available, this is big player game at this point in the US. The homestead act allotments were meant for dirt poor living such as for people who wouldn't be able to afford a visit to a dentist, much less the expenses of modern life.
Also, all that land is actually owned by private owners or is a public land (which won't be let go), and some of it is owned by the military and tribes, so there's no more free land in the US (unless there's communist revolution! and even then confiscated land would be given to the Natives/repatriation). That boat had sailed so long ago.....
 
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Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Did you get the chickens? I saw a pretty ingenious chicken farming method on youtube recently. Just a cart (moved every few days by a tractor) that the chicks all congregate under naturally. No need for fencing, apparently.
My neighbor started doing that last year. What a difference it made in how his yard looks. He improved upon it this year a bit too, and its even better. He must have 60 chickens running around in there now.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
Any advice where's a good place to look to buy a good used compact tractor? How are Yanmar tractors?

Hard to say. Sometimes you can find them up on the side of the road for sale out in the country. Older guys like to fix them up and sell the old models. What kind of HP are you looking for ? 25- 50? Are you looking for a loader on it or what is the intended use?
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I'm looking into regenerative farming as a hopeful cover for the survival of my farm through environmental taxes surrounding carbon. The idea is also that your land is better when you work with nature, when your soil is alive with micro organisms, in addition to the mineral component. Essentially you try to mimic nature and the quality of the product is improved.


A farmer tells his story, and gives his views.

 

kel

Ostrich
I'm not (yet) a farmer, unlike you, but I've been obsessed with rotational grazing and mixed-species pasturing (having an orchard in which your ruminants graze on the grass, have layer hens follow a few days later) ever since this bug got in my brain a few years ago - read and watched a lot of stuff by Joel Salatin, Allan Savory, Peter Ballerstedt, etc.. Please keep sharing your plans and progress here.
 

john_Jea

Sparrow
I just order the "Holistic management handbook" from the Savory institute. I made the mistake of ordering the textbook first which they advice against, I flipped through it and it looks to be chock full of info.

I have been looking into regenerative farming for a couple of months and I am looking forward to do some experiments in the near future.
 
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