Fasting food ideas.(My priest recommends 3 days before Liturgy plus the Wednesday fast makes 4 1/2 days of fasting each week...if I've figured right)

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
This kind of "fasting" sounds like pretty much how my dad eats NEARLY 100% of the time.

(Cannot deny the obvious health benefits; he started eating like this a few years ago and I've gone from worrying about his health and longevity at times, to being like "holy crap, he's gotten spry for an old man.")

So I'm curious - if someone's regular diet already precludes all of the foods they're supposed to go without when fasting -- would they be recommended to forego "extra" things in the spirit of obedience, or to attain a spiritual condition or state above and beyond their usual?

My mom is a vegetarian and does no-dairy on Wednesdays and Fridays. My dad also kind of eats like that all the time, too (he does eat meat occasionally but mostly eats fish); he's in his 60s and is sort of defying aging because he walks everywhere and doesn't overeat.

For my husband Lent meant no meat and a lot of fish (he won't eat tilapia ever again because of it haha), but they ate dairy.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
Yeah, at this point unless one of us kids brings him some kind of treat or special food for a holiday or gathering, my dad basically ONLY eats various arrangements of: legumes, potatoes, winter squash, nuts, fruits, vegetables. Raw or boiled, steamed, and/or baked. Dumped on a plate. Usually no added fats of any kind.

If I ate like that all the time, I guess I'd approach this sort of fasting with some confusion over whether I was "already doing it right by default," or if the spirit of fasting would demand that I impose further restrictions. If that makes sense?
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
Yeah, at this point unless one of us kids brings him some kind of treat or special food for a holiday or gathering, my dad basically ONLY eats various arrangements of: legumes, potatoes, winter squash, nuts, fruits, vegetables. Raw or boiled, steamed, and/or baked. Dumped on a plate. Usually no added fats of any kind.

If I ate like that all the time, I guess I'd approach this sort of fasting with some confusion over whether I was "already doing it right by default," or if the spirit of fasting would demand that I impose further restrictions. If that makes sense?

I dunno, you do you. I grew up around a lot of "label-reader" types who are hyper aware of everything, and it seems kind of counterproductive-- on the other hand, being aware of what goes in your body isn't a bad thing at all, so I think that has its uses, too. Everyone is different.

I think with fasting comes an awareness of our behavior, so those are the things that are most important.
 

IconWriter

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
This kind of "fasting" sounds like pretty much how my dad eats NEARLY 100% of the time.

(Cannot deny the obvious health benefits; he started eating like this a few years ago and I've gone from worrying about his health and longevity at times, to being like "holy crap, he's gotten spry for an old man.")

So I'm curious - if someone's regular diet already precludes all of the foods they're supposed to go without when fasting -- would they be recommended to forego "extra" things in the spirit of obedience, or to attain a spiritual condition or state above and beyond their usual?

I've had such a hard time wrapping my head around "fasting" in the Christian context, because I grew up fasting for certain Vedic holidays, and that always meant no food. On at least one day out of the year that I recall, it was no food AND no water for 24 hours.

For someone who grew up really poor and eating mostly things like lentils, fruits, vegetables, etc. anyway, my kneejerk reaction is "Fasting? That just sounds like EATING!"
I heard a priest joke that for the fasting periods, if you're already a vegan you HAVE to eat meat! LOL! Seriously, I don't know what the priest would suggest in that situation.
 

christie2

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
Thank you @Raskolnikov for the link, I will download it soon. I haven't read in German before so that will be fun and challenging.
I've picked up a little understanding of Greek...That's awesome you are making 2 or more recipes a week. Keep going, do them all if you like them!
 

christie2

Robin
Woman
Orthodox

I found this article in a hyperlink in an article Roosh recommended in his thread on '33 Christian articles (he) recommend(s)'
Thanks for the leadership Roosh.

I wanted to tuck it into my thread on fasting ideas.
Some of the suggestions are from what I remember when I was a little girl. My parents were determined to find other ways to fast during Lent and encouraged us to do the same.
This is the first time in my life, I realised it's okay to get direction and leadership directly from a priest.

Also, I have a new priest since starting this thread.
 
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messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I found this article in a hyperlink in an article Roosh recommended in his thread on '33 Christian articles (he) recommend(s)'
Thanks for the leadership Roosh.

Thank you @christie2 for reading and sharing this article.

It was very helpful and allowed reflection on prayer sequence with Scripture reading.

It would be interesting to hear if you have a sequence for How to Pray . Only if you would like to share; you have inspired interest in Orthodox- praying and fasting.

This recommendation stood out from the shared article:

It is recommended to read the Gospel and the Epistle of the day every day right after the morning prayers. These are short pieces of reading and it will be very good if a believer meditates on the subject of the reading during the day.

Why else is it important to combine prayer with reading of the Word of God? If I just pray, then such a prayer may become a mere monologue and not rise higher than my ceiling. But if I combine reading of the Word of God with prayer, then it comes out that I ask God in my prayer, and He answers me through the Holy Scripture.
 

christie2

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
Thanks for invitation to another thread, I'm glad you found value here messagera.

Do you have fasting food or other fasting ideas?
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
Do you have fasting food or other fasting ideas?

Yesterday I had rotini pasta salad with black olives, cherry tomatoes, red onions, cucumbers, and a garlic vinaigrette (no oil).
Had to leave out the Bocconcini (mozzarella cheese). There will be attempt to make our own garlic vinaigrette using whole cloves because the local provider uses canola oil.

I found this fasting recipe resource helpful from St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Tennessee, for ideas. Similar to current diet, but difficult because I grew up with a mediterranean diet (with olive oil in almost everything) as a teenager/young adult. Salads and soups have always been loaded.

Do you have any favorite dishes for fasting?
 

IconWriter

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
Those 4- or 5-bean salads are great. You marinate your veggies: a little onion, green beans, wax beans, kidney beans, chick peas, etc. in a vinegar-oil mixture of your choice (for oil days, or depending on how fast your fast) that has a little sugar in it. It keeps a long time and you can replenish the veggies along the way. Feeds a crowd (potlucks!).
 
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