Favorite Movie Scenes

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I'm in that scene! The Irish reserve army (FCA) were used for the battle scenes. I'm not visible though, I was near the back with my staff!
A lad beside me had one as well, he let it slip and it landed on someone's head below him, the guy had a nasty gash to his head, I remember the ambulance coming along to take him away!
I shouldn't laugh but the banter at the time was hilarious! (the injured lad was fine afterwards).
It's good to have those memories, was some experience being part of it. We got to meet Mel briefly, came across as no nonsense, but charismatic and warm.

That is a very cool story. One of my favorite movies and one of the last truly great movies in the west to achieve both mass commercial success and critical acclaim.

This is one of my favorites (language warning). Guy Ritchie's first 2 movies are among the true greats IMO.

 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
This list would be incomplete without the "Sicilian" scene from TRUE ROMANCE. Quentin Tarantino himself has named "The Sicilian scene" as one of his proudest moments. Its both menacingly intense as it is darkly comic.


The entire movie is a tour de force with an incredible cast including unknowns at the time that went on to be major stars, like Brad Pitt , James Gandolfini, Tom Sizemore.

The Sicilian Scene with Dennis Hopper and Christopher Walken is sublime

Its genius is the demonstration of a deeply flawed man making the ultimate sacrifice based on his love for his son

WARNING : LANGUAGE & VIOLENCE

 
Last edited:

MRAll134

Pelican
Have to watch Heat again, Michael Mann is fantastic film maker. What you think of Manhunter (1986)?

I watched the clips. I know that I have seen Manhunter 8 or 9 years ago. But, I hardly remember it. Collateral stands out more to me, especially the ending.
You are right, Mann is a genius. His score always synchs up well with the story, emotion on-screen. He is similar to John Carpenter - that way.
 

amity

Pelican
Gold Member
Don't wish to be a downer but that scene above from American History X likely helped radicalise thousands of young blacks. Several innocent white people would be alive today were it not for that scene particularly from that film.
Unsurprisingly the director stems from a certain group (whose elites at least are) well used to inciting minorities to hate whitey.
 
Don't wish to be a downer but that scene above from American History X likely helped radicalise thousands of young blacks. Several innocent white people would be alive today were it not for that scene particularly from that film.
Unsurprisingly the director stems from a certain group (whose elites at least are) well used to inciting minorities to hate whitey.
Sadly and realistically innocent white people would be alive today if they opened their eyes. Savages do not need an excuse to act in a savage manner. And, as I have said before, if whitey was actually the monster they claim, we would not being having that particular problem.
 

DenizenJane

Woodpecker
Who could've guessed on a forum like this? Surprise




I think the writer of the book and the producers of the film were going for a secular humanist view of things, like most science fiction, but oh well.

When you read the original script, the original Roy Batty lines read out as ranty and kinda stupid.

The final scene of the film was improvised by the actor, and it was said that some of the recording crew broke into tears while filming it...

I believe it.
 

RalphMalph

Woodpecker
Who would've guessed on a forum like this...




I think the writer of the book and the producers of the film were going for a secular humanist view of things, like most science fiction, but oh well.

When you read the original script, the original Roy Batty lines read out as ranty and kinda stupid.

The final scene of the film was improvised by the actor, and it was said that some of the recording crew broke into tears while filming it...

I believe it.
Would any of you want to see the Tannhauser Gate?

Rutger Hauer was a very underrated actor. I remember an alternate history TV series set in a Post-Nazi WWII victory that may have been on HBO back in the 90's but forgot the name of it.
 

DenizenJane

Woodpecker
Would any of you want to see the Tannhauser Gate?

Yessir.

For me, those two brief descriptions are nods to how universally difficult it is for humans to communicate their most defining experiences or sights without losing some of the desired affect.

And that in the grand scheme of things, they are forgotten anyway. Hence- tears in rain.

Its a predicament that everyone from Carl Sagan to King Solomon would agree on.

My grandfather once said that as soon as they invented quantum computers with screens that could link to human brains and make movies out of memories, he would do it for us. Never happened, of course. I'm sure some of the WWII stuff would have been terrifying to watch, anyway. But a very long interesting life he had. That computer comment though, was an indirect admission that old guy stories, told multiple times, even to interested folk, still can't convey the full experience. Someone will never 'get it' as well as you would like, and its nobody's fault.

Its why you usually can't show more than five vacation pictures, especially landscape ones, without the intended party indicating that they're bored.

Its why older folk who drift into nostalgia of their youngers days almost always become objects of ridicule.

Its why when someone dies the intensity of grief radiates out from next of kin and drops off rapidly until you're just another name read in the newspaper obituary.

This ain't to be salty or pretentious. It was just an exceptionally good actor and an exceptionally good character, is all.
 

MRAll134

Pelican
Who could've guessed on a forum like this? Surprise




I think the writer of the book and the producers of the film were going for a secular humanist view of things, like most science fiction, but oh well.

When you read the original script, the original Roy Batty lines read out as ranty and kinda stupid.

The final scene of the film was improvised by the actor, and it was said that some of the recording crew broke into tears while filming it...

I believe it.
It is not all secular. I just read Jay Dyer's first book - "Esoteric Hollywood." He says of Blade Runner and Batty: "remember that when Roy Batty saves Deckard from the precipice, his palm is nailed in a Christ-like fashion, while he sets free a dove - another mercurial image (pg 240)." From earlier in the movie Dyer mentions the pyramid in which Tyrell lives: "when the viewer approaches the pyramid in the opening scene, it is engulfed in golden sunlight, conjuring up notions of Ra and Egypt. The mysteries of Egypt center around the godlike philosopher king (Pharoah, [Tyrell], pg. 231)." Pyramids, like on US dollars, are often pictured uncapped. This is because at the top of the hierarchy - members are hidden in secrecy.
 
Top