Finding Allies & Deciding Locations

bucky

Pelican
There is no place in the Anglosphere you can move for a "secure future away from clownworld." There were literally protests in every Western city in the world, and some smaller towns as well. We even had a protest in Lewisville, TX which is about red as it gets in DFW. Clownworld has billions of dollars of resources to take the poz to wherever you are.

You have to create a secure future by having a commitment to a community and church, building a family and raising a family there, standing up for your values. Flying to Switzerland says, "I don't care about my country or my community, I'd rather give up my citizenship than save it."

Sure, if you live in a big coastal blue metropolis like DC, NYC or Seattle, you should probably move away from those regions. Texas though? I see what you're saying about Texas becoming more Democrat or whatever, but it's surely not that pozzed (Don't even compare it to Colorado). The major blue areas are tiny specs on the map and concentrate mostly around the border towns, Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio. I can drive 30 minutes outside of Dallas County and be around the most normal, middle-class, family-oriented Christian people you can get anywhere in the country. It's like that in most exurbs actually. The Mexicans are the least of my concerns in Texas, I'd worry more about the Californians moving in and the locals leaving. Texas is part of Mexico basically, there have always been Mexicans here and a lot of them have very stable families. A lot of the Mexicans I know are conservatives.

So yeah, no place is perfect. But we're not going to win this by hiding in Montana or Switzerland. At the end of the day, the Democrats want to displace conservatives from Red states like Texas. I'm not going to let them have it. There are good bones here to work with, like a church-oriented culture and stronger families.
I thought the (admittedly vague) plan was to regroup in the Dakotas or somewhere like that. I hope I'm wrong, but I think Texas is done in another generation because of demographics and proximity to the southern border. Two generations tops. I get along well with most Mexicans and Central Americans I know too, but although they might be conservative, Catholic, whatever, they vote overwhelmingly blue. You've seen those maps of what the electoral college would look like if only non-whites voted, right? In case you haven't, it's all blue, every state, coast to coast.

I hope I'm wrong about Texas and you can turn it around somehow down there, but I don't see it. The worst thing is that when Texas goes solid blue, the whole country is pretty much done and the Republicans become a small, regional party that gradually fades away, like the Federalists in the early 19th century.

You are correct that Colorado is much further along the path to hell overall, and that ultimately, they'll come for us anywhere we go. I think what people are looking for is somewhere to move to that will buy us more time and, in my opinion, Texas isn't it.
 
I'm an American living in a hardcore leftist blue state. Recent events have finally influenced me to get out.

My initial plan would be for me to escape to Eastern Europe, Russia, or possibly somewhere in South America like Uruguay or Paraguay. However, I have an elderly family member I'm looking after with dementia. The decline of their mental faculties has been gradual; they are not fully gone yet, and I'd wager it'll be another few years or so until that happens. Not sure what to do with said family member. I already know they would refuse to leave the country with me.

For now, I'm looking at states like Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, possibly Florida since gun laws are fairly lax there and it's still a red state. Though that'll probably change in a generation or two.

Is anyone else here being held back by family preventing you from leaving? What's the best course of action here?
 

kel

Pelican
Not quite the same situation as yours, but I'm looking to make a farmstead somewhere and one of my considerations is necessarily proximity to my parents. I want to get them to move out there, but that might be tough, and farther it is from what they know the more of a pain it'll be to convince them, or at least my mom, she's very set it in her ways (it wasn't all that long ago that she was talking about going to south America to retire, as a lot of boomers without the money to retire in the US are apparently doing). Neither of them have dementia, but they're your typical boomers who lived kinda shitty lifestyles and caring for them is undoubtedly in my future - if I'm lucky I'll have another ten years before it's a necessity, if I'm unlucky maybe quite a bit sooner.

Anyways, I don't have an answer for either of us. My plan right now is to get a place that's sorta near where they live/I grew up, sorta near other family, and which coincidentally is kinda centrally located for a lot of the people who might be joining this farmstead. But, my mom would probably chuff at the idea of moving to the opposite end of the city she currently lives in, so I know it'll be a challenge. To be honest, at a certain point I'll call her bluff, say "I'm moving here, I'd like you to be there, but if you don't want to that's your choice. Your grandchildren will be happy to see you whenever you decide you can come out for a day here or there". In the end they're just one of many factors, and while they're my parents and I do have a responsibility to them, I have a lot of responsibilities and a lot of things I need to consider in this brave new world that's coming, I can't let boomer stick-in-the-mud mentality overrule everything.
 

kel

Pelican
Oh yeah, as for red state blue state I'm kinda ignoring that. Maybe not the wisest idea, but again there are a million factors, and I'm expecting that being outside a major metropolitan area is more important than the state being red or blue. So, a rural area in the very very neon blue state I'm from. It means my taxes will be higher to pay for the usual litany of bullshit, and it means strictly speaking we'll be subject to the vanguard of clown world laws and regulations, but ideally that latter part won't matter too much if we can just kinda keep separate from that.
 
I'm an American living in a hardcore leftist blue state. Recent events have finally influenced me to get out.

My initial plan would be for me to escape to Eastern Europe, Russia, or possibly somewhere in South America like Uruguay or Paraguay. However, I have an elderly family member I'm looking after with dementia. The decline of their mental faculties has been gradual; they are not fully gone yet, and I'd wager it'll be another few years or so until that happens. Not sure what to do with said family member. I already know they would refuse to leave the country with me.

For now, I'm looking at states like Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, possibly Florida since gun laws are fairly lax there and it's still a red state. Though that'll probably change in a generation or two.

Is anyone else here being held back by family preventing you from leaving? What's the best course of action here?

I am in a similar situation, I would love to live in South America, however my job requires me to be in my current city and I have elderly parents, I recommend staying where your parents currently are, and work your job / save money for now. You only have one set of parents. In the interim, you can learn new skills / make the most of what you have around you.
 

Deepdiver

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Hate to put it this way... Did you get a Direct Deposit of Trump bux from the IRS?

Yes... Then they know how to find you and how to get you. Your Soros Funded Biden AOC BLM overseer will find, tax and destroy you all.

They only cure is elect Trump in 2020 then a Patriots Revolution in 2024.
 
Leaving the country is pretty wimpy IMO unless you have a wife/close family living in a country in Poland, for instance. That doesn't mean you have to live in a shitty area like Portland.... but find a good area, get involved with the community, have children and do good wherever you are planted. There is no utopia anywhere, but not all of the U.S. (or whatever Western country you live in) is lost.

There are plenty of places in the U.S. that haven't gone full clown world. I've heard good things about Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, though I have not been there. Oregon, outside of the big cities, was pretty nice. I know there are good parts of Washington state, too. Then you have plenty of options down in the Southeast that still have the cultural roots rather than globohomo pollution.
 
Sure, if you live in a big coastal blue metropolis like DC, NYC or Seattle, you should probably move away from those regions. Texas though? I see what you're saying about Texas becoming more Democrat or whatever, but it's surely not that pozzed (Don't even compare it to Colorado). The major blue areas are tiny specs on the map and concentrate mostly around the border towns, Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio.
I'm curious to hear what you guys think about the suburbs outside of Austin. I will be buying a house next year and need to decide on if I'm going to stay in the ATX metro area, or go somewhere else. Budget is around $400k.

I really like living near Austin — I would never live in the city proper, but living outside the city has its benefits (opera/symphony, restaurants, smart people, lots of work, airport). I love the outdoor activities, the Hill Country, the farms/ranches.

My priorities are:
  1. Be part of a community where I can be involved with civics, contribute, be a member etc.
  2. Have space for prep/self defense and like-minded neighbors to partner with.*
  3. Have a high quality of life — a neighborhood with culture and intelligent people (I think a rural environment would be depressing and lonely).
* I am NOT interested in going full Rawles and getting a homestead out in Montana, simply because I don't have the skills and time to figure them out... I'm taking my chances in the burbs.

So far, a few places are popping up:
  • Georgetown & Cedar Park — most traditional suburbs, but fairly conservative, close-knit small town feel.
  • Wimberley — beautiful scenery, but expensive and older pop.
  • Blanco/Johnson City - further out, cheaper, I don't know them that well.
  • Fredericksburg — most conservative and best from a demographic perspective, but a long haul from Austin.
But ain't Texas going blue? I think it will, but I'm not making choices based on red/blue state dynamics, because 1) I assume it's a foregone conclusion that states tip blue due to demographic replacement, and 2) I expect the US to decline (if not collapse) in the next decade, meaning your neighbors and immediate community will be far, far more relevant than whether your every-4-year-measured red/blue split is 49/51 or 51/49.

Texas has liberal gun & self-defense laws, zero income tax, the economy's in good shape. And even the demographic shift doesn't bother me as much, since many if not most Hispanics are conservative, Catholic, family-oriented people. People who have families and private property tend to be good citizens regardless of cultural background; it's people who have nothing to lose who cause trouble.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
many if not most Hispanics are conservative, Catholic, family-oriented people. People who have families and private property tend to be good citizens regardless of cultural background; it's people who have nothing to lose who cause trouble.
I keep hearing this. I don't think it stands up well to the evidence. I think this stat is the gold-standard of conservativism:



I don't know about Mexico, but in Colombia about half of people have next to or no input from their father. That's probably worse than blacks in The US. Hispanics may have some reactionary leanings, i.e. anti-gay, but they are by and large not steeped in any conservative values. Women tend to show large amounts of flesh.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
I'm curious to hear what you guys think about the suburbs outside of Austin. I will be buying a house next year and need to decide on if I'm going to stay in the ATX metro area, or go somewhere else. Budget is around $400k.

I really like living near Austin — I would never live in the city proper, but living outside the city has its benefits (opera/symphony, restaurants, smart people, lots of work, airport). I love the outdoor activities, the Hill Country, the farms/ranches.

My priorities are:
  1. Be part of a community where I can be involved with civics, contribute, be a member etc.
  2. Have space for prep/self defense and like-minded neighbors to partner with.*
  3. Have a high quality of life — a neighborhood with culture and intelligent people (I think a rural environment would be depressing and lonely).
* I am NOT interested in going full Rawles and getting a homestead out in Montana, simply because I don't have the skills and time to figure them out... I'm taking my chances in the burbs.

So far, a few places are popping up:
  • Georgetown & Cedar Park — most traditional suburbs, but fairly conservative, close-knit small town feel.
  • Wimberley — beautiful scenery, but expensive and older pop.
  • Blanco/Johnson City - further out, cheaper, I don't know them that well.
  • Fredericksburg — most conservative and best from a demographic perspective, but a long haul from Austin.
But ain't Texas going blue? I think it will, but I'm not making choices based on red/blue state dynamics, because 1) I assume it's a foregone conclusion that states tip blue due to demographic replacement, and 2) I expect the US to decline (if not collapse) in the next decade, meaning your neighbors and immediate community will be far, far more relevant than whether your every-4-year-measured red/blue split is 49/51 or 51/49.

Texas has liberal gun & self-defense laws, zero income tax, the economy's in good shape. And even the demographic shift doesn't bother me as much, since many if not most Hispanics are conservative, Catholic, family-oriented people. People who have families and private property tend to be good citizens regardless of cultural background; it's people who have nothing to lose who cause trouble.
Dallas has better suburbs. More to do. Less politicized by transplants. More young people and singles. More diverse economy that isn't dependent on the city. Better infrastructure to handle the regional growth. I suspect the housing is also more affordable.

I don't get the appeal of Austin at all, and if you're not living in Austin proper you might as well look at other parts of Texas.
Unless you have a lot of social ties there, I'd just pick up and leave when you can.
 
Last edited:

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
I keep hearing this. I don't think it stands up well to the evidence. I think this stat is the gold-standard of conservativism:



I don't know about Mexico, but in Colombia about half of people have next to or no input from their father. That's probably worse than blacks in The US. Hispanics may have some reactionary leanings, i.e. anti-gay, but they are by and large not steeped in any conservative values. Women tend to show large amounts of flesh.
Those stats are old. 2008?

Marriage is pretty heavily correlated to income.
So that's more the issue than the ethnic differences.

Hispanics are way more family-oriented than whites. Texas also is full of middle class Hispanics and Blacks, it isn't like a lot of the country.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
I thought the (admittedly vague) plan was to regroup in the Dakotas or somewhere like that. I hope I'm wrong, but I think Texas is done in another generation because of demographics and proximity to the southern border. Two generations tops. I get along well with most Mexicans and Central Americans I know too, but although they might be conservative, Catholic, whatever, they vote overwhelmingly blue. You've seen those maps of what the electoral college would look like if only non-whites voted, right? In case you haven't, it's all blue, every state, coast to coast.

I hope I'm wrong about Texas and you can turn it around somehow down there, but I don't see it. The worst thing is that when Texas goes solid blue, the whole country is pretty much done and the Republicans become a small, regional party that gradually fades away, like the Federalists in the early 19th century.

You are correct that Colorado is much further along the path to hell overall, and that ultimately, they'll come for us anywhere we go. I think what people are looking for is somewhere to move to that will buy us more time and, in my opinion, Texas isn't it.
I don't really know why you think Texas is going "solid blue". It's just a difference in whose getting out the vote and whose excited about their candidates. The culture here isn't going to automatically change if we vote for a different presidential candidate this year.

As far as demographics go, a lot of middle-class people are moving here and buying houses. This is basically the #1 refuge for middle-class Americans who want to get away from the coastal craziness and raise their families in peace. I see lots of New Jersey, New York, and Illinois plates here.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Hispanics are way more family-oriented than whites. Texas also is full of middle class Hispanics and Blacks, it isn't like a lot of the country.
What is the evidence? If they were they wouldn't be having so many children out of wedlock. In Serbia the average wage is probably about $300-400 pm and the divorce rate is a third of The US and children out of wedlock are much lower. It appears it's now probably more like 55%:

https://www.kidsdata.org/topic/745/.../table#fmt=1133&loc=1,2&tf=84&ch=7,11,8,507,9

You have the same low divorce and bastardy rates in much of SE and Far Eastern Europe and most are as poor or poorer than Mexico. The difference is those countries have retrained conservative traditions. If Latinos were ever conservative they certainly aren't now.

And if they were so conservative they wouldn't be singlehandely turning Texas blue - voting for the party of anyone can immigrate and go straight onto welfare and the voting rolls, abortion, drag queens and so on. Conservative people would never be able to bring themselves to vote for the current Democratic Party.

I'm sure people were saying what you two were saying in 1980s California. Now California is an s-hole state - completely lost - another country. Austin will follow.
 
Dallas has better suburbs. More to do. Less politicized by transplants. More young people and singles. More diverse economy that isn't dependent on the city. Better infrastructure to handle the regional growth. I suspect the housing is also more affordable.

I don't get the appeal of Austin at all, and if you're not living in Austin proper you might as well look at other parts of Texas.
Unless you have a lot of social ties there, I'd just pick up and leave when you can.
Thanks! I won't rule out other cities in TX and I will definitely head up to Dallas to scope it out.

It will be hard to convince me to leave Austin, though. I moved out here on a whim a few years back, from a collapsing liberal shithole megacity back east, and it was like reaching the mirage. The quality of life is outstanding. People are friendly and polite. The hills and greenbelts are gorgeous.

For all of the hyper-lib stereotypes around Austin, the WORST I've seen out here doesn't hold a candle to what I saw in the city I left. Austin has its liberal fringe to be sure, but it's still Texas. Young folks here have guns, eat red meat, go to church.

And what I really appreciate is that I get all of the amenities of a major world city, but with a decidedly small-town feel. I know Austin has exploded in recent years, but I really like that I'm on a first-name basis with the owners of restaurants I go to... I bump into people I know at the parks... people here still give directions that are like "You know where that Baby A's is? Yeah, the one with that mouthy waitress... make a right turn there and I'm the next block down..." And I've been able to get deeply involved with organizations close to my passions.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
Thanks! I won't rule out other cities in TX and I will definitely head up to Dallas to scope it out.

It will be hard to convince me to leave Austin, though. I moved out here on a whim a few years back, from a collapsing liberal shithole megacity back east, and it was like reaching the mirage. The quality of life is outstanding. People are friendly and polite. The hills and greenbelts are gorgeous.

For all of the hyper-lib stereotypes around Austin, the WORST I've seen out here doesn't hold a candle to what I saw in the city I left. Austin has its liberal fringe to be sure, but it's still Texas. Young folks here have guns, eat red meat, go to church.

And what I really appreciate is that I get all of the amenities of a major world city, but with a decidedly small-town feel. I know Austin has exploded in recent years, but I really like that I'm on a first-name basis with the owners of restaurants I go to... I bump into people I know at the parks... people here still give directions that are like "You know where that Baby A's is? Yeah, the one with that mouthy waitress... make a right turn there and I'm the next block down..." And I've been able to get deeply involved with organizations close to my passions.
I get you, but the activists in Portland eh hem, I mean Austin, are already blocking I-35 at nightly intervals. It's only a matter of time they march into the suburbs, St. Louis style. Austin metro is not that big... It's a blessing and a curse, because you're never too far from the poz. Of All the cities in the South (and Texas), Austin has the most high octane activists and political culture. The only thing that has saved the city has been Covid and the Summer, UTA is out and that deprives the poz of foot soldiers.

If a city is having nightly protests right now, consider it a canary in a coal mine of places where you don't want to be.
 
Last edited:
I get you, but the activists in Portland eh hem, I mean Austin, are already blocking I-35 at nightly intervals. It's only a matter of time they march into the suburbs, St. Louis style. Austin metro is not that big... It's a blessing and a curse, because you're never too far from the poz. Of All the cities in the South (and Texas), Austin has the most high octane activists and political culture. The only thing that has saved the city has been Covid and the Summer, UTA is out and that deprives the poz of foot soldiers.

If a city is having nightly protests right now, consider it a canary in a coal mine of places where you don't want to be.
Fair enough. What you've cited are among the top reasons that I wouldn't live in the city. But do you think I'd get enough distance in some of the other areas I'm looking at (Canyon Lake area, New Braunfels, Blanco etc.)

I'm just looking to get a half-decent house and a bit of land where I can have peace and quiet, start a (small) vegetable garden and other homestead type stuff. While being near enough to the city for occasional meetings, flights, cultural events, and so on.

I can't ever see the poz coming out to ranch country. Where would they even march?
 
Last edited:

Deepdiver

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I just found out a wealthy aquantence protects his wealth in the new global Switzerland... Who knew South Dakota Trusts have become legal body armor with financial Secrecy that puts the Swiss to Shame... This is some Hard Core Red State protection that turns out to be competitive globally... Prevents divorce rape, frivolous law suits, and idiot heirs from pissing away family fortunes... If SD has any good trout unlimited fly fishing spots it could give purple rainbow flag state NH a run for the money... Now that all the MA lezbee-friends and pozzers have moved from BLMpantifa Massilltaxitoyou and NueveJork to Live Free or literally Die.



His trusts hold his intl biz corporations... Lots of former offshore Tax Haven's and AOC Biden 90% taxers whining about it... Go figure.
 
Last edited:

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
Fair enough. What you've cited are among the top reasons that I wouldn't live in the city. But do you think I'd get enough distance in some of the other areas I'm looking at (Canyon Lake area, New Braunfels, Blanco etc.)

I'm just looking to get a half-decent house and a bit of land where I can have peace and quiet, start a (small) vegetable garden and other homestead type stuff. While being near enough to the city for occasional meetings, flights, cultural events, and so on.

I can't ever see the poz coming out to ranch country. Where would they even march?
I've spent a good bit of time in the area you are mentioning. I don't consider any of those places part of the Austin Metro.
It's more half way between Austin and San Antonio. The whole area is a tourist spot, like a place I'd take my girlfriend for a weekend getaway.

I would be bored in a week living in that area, but different strokes for different folks. What passes for nature and wilderness in Texas is sad. Hill Country doesn't hold a candle to what we have on the East Coast (West Virginia, Florida, ect.).
 
Last edited:

Leonard D Neubache

Owl
Gold Member
Those stats are old. 2008?

Marriage is pretty heavily correlated to income.
So that's more the issue than the ethnic differences.

Hispanics are way more family-oriented than whites. Texas also is full of middle class Hispanics and Blacks, it isn't like a lot of the country.
Hispanics have more in tact family units but I don't think you have any serious insight into their wholesome, conservative family lives.

Husbands bashing wives, being drunk half the time, the wife sleeping around, cousins fucking each other, fathers abusing their daughters, brothers abusing their sisters, and unlike in European families where individualistic leanings will cause someone to leave rather than suffer continual abuse, the tribal leaning is inherently stronger for latinos so they just accept that these fucked up things are a part of life and they still get together every weekend to have a barbecue with their abusers/abusees.

"Family oriented". Sure. I guess you could qualify a tribe of cannibals in the Amazon as being "family oriented".

No hate. But you have to see these things for what they are. There's a reason it's called "Mexican foreplay". Hispanics are closer to the way jewish media portrays heartland Whites. Prone to lower IQ's, family abuse, substance abuse and religion as judgement rather than salvation.

And just to be a million percent clear, I'm not passing judgement on them. They have their virtues and we are all on the same road to God. But don't go in for the Neo-Con lies that they're all like the people in the taco commercials. They're selling you that idea in order to weaken you to flooding the USA with cheap labor. They're well aware that these folks are not compatible with European culture but they do pick strawberries on Monsanto megafarms for cheap and they stay away from high end of town so the GOP luminaries really don't give a shit if your chances of being shanked by a cholo rise substantially every time they import another million scabs.
 
Last edited:
Top