Following Along With The Liturgy in ROCOR

DRIIIVER

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Today was my fifth Sunday with a parish I have been attending, and while the first three weeks I felt an immense sense of peace simply being in the presence of worshipping believers and the Holy Eucharist, I have begun to feel restless and distracted. The Priest gave me a packet of inquirer information last week, including "The Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom and Saint Basil the Great" published by sjkp.org, which speaking with the Priest after the Liturgy today, I was supposed to bring!

If anyone is in a ROCOR parish, is it relatively simple to follow along with the intermingled Slavic and Russian language? I was flipping through it this evening and I recognize parts of the prayers, hymns, and chants from the past few weeks. I pray this will increase my faith and involvement in the Liturgy now that I can follow and read along!
 

lskdfjldsf

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
I don't attend ROCOR so I'm not sure how relevant this is, but the book "The Heavenly Banquet" by Fr. Hatzidakis has been very helpful to me. It's a detailed walkthrough of the Divine Liturgy in English with commentary, context, Scripture, etc. to guide you along. Might make sense to understand what is being said and why before tackling translations.
 
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Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
I attend ROCOR, and it would be difficult to know what is going on if it weren’t for the fact that we used to attend an Antiochian parish in English.

Try watching a Divine Liturgy in English on YouTube to help with the language barrier.
 

DRIIIVER

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I don't attend ROCOR so I'm not sure how relevant this is, but the book "The Heavenly Banquet" by Fr. Hatzidakis has been very helpful to me. It's a detailed walkthrough of the Divine Liturgy in English with commentary, context, Scripture, etc. to guide you along. Might make sense to understand what is being said and why before tackling translations.
That would be helpful. Interestingly enough the Priest made it a point today to tell everyone that next week he is going to walk us through the Liturgy and explain the meaning behind each part and answer any questions we may have. Very much looking forward to it.
 

DRIIIVER

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I attend ROCOR, and it would be difficult to know what is going on if it weren’t for the fact that we used to attend an Antiochian parish in English.

Try watching a Divine Liturgy in English on YouTube to help with the language barrier.
I will! I guess my next question is do all canonical Eastern Orthodox Liturgies follow the same format established by St. John Chrysostom and St. Basil the Great? It is universal?
 

Patrick1

Pigeon
Orthodox
I used to follow along with an english translation but felt like I was missing out just looking down the whole time instead of watching and following along. The language difference doesn't bother me but your experience may be different.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I have begun to feel restless and distracted
Why are you going to Church? Is it to be entertained? Probably not. So where do you think these negative feelings are coming from? The language has nothing to do with it as long as you have print translations.

The Liturgy is not to blame. You have to do a self examination or else the temptation to stay away will increase.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
At my parish it's about 95% in English with only small parts in Slavonic, and they're stuff like litanies and parts of the Trisagion Hymn where it alternates with English, so you contextually figure out what they're saying after just a short time of going to the liturgy. Though after over a year of attending here, I'd feel confident going to an all-Slavonic liturgy since I've pretty much learned it at this point.

Jordanville also publishes bilingual service books for the liturgies, I have these and follow along in them sometimes - it's nice being able to read the extra prayers the priests say silently behind the iconostasis. But it'd be especially useful in a parish where the service is all in Slavonic.
 

Lawrence87

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Having had experience of the Liturgy in both English and Slavonic, I would say that it being in English is not going to stop you getting distracted, however it can help pull you out of it being able to understand what is being said.

At the Slavonic parish I attend, I will say the Jesus Prayer in my mind when I get distracted, or otherwise pray for myself and the other parishoners etc.
 

DRIIIVER

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Is it to be entertained? Probably not. So where do you think these negative feelings are coming from?
Oh no absolutely not. Simply standing and watching for me is a lack of engagement in the words and meaning of each part of the Liturgy. I want to go deeper and follow what is happening, not simply view it from far off, as a spectator. Because when it is over I don’t really have an idea of what happened. I don’t need to be entertained, God forbid.
The Liturgy is not to blame. You have to do a self examination or else the temptation to stay away will increase.
Perhaps I didn’t do well at explaining my thoughts. I desire to go deeper into understanding the Liturgy. My ignorance of its intricacies has not become something pushing me away from attending moving forward.
 
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DRIIIVER

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I will say the Jesus Prayer in my mind when I get distracted, or otherwise pray for myself and the other parishoners
That is exactly what I do. I spend 50% of the time praying for loved ones that come to mind, coworkers, etc, and the other 50% taking in the words I can understand and watching the Liturgy.

I fully take any distraction or discontent I may feel on myself and ask for forgiveness, but it’s not from a place of feeling the need to be entertained, I just simply don’t know what’s going on.

I don’t believe God calls any of us to the Orthodox faith to simply be a spectator.
 

Mike Contro Rossi

Sparrow
Orthodox
I don't attend ROCOR so I'm not sure how relevant this is, but the book "The Heavenly Banquet" by Fr. Hatzidakis has been very helpful to me. It's a detailed walkthrough of the Divine Liturgy in English with commentary, context, Scripture, etc. to guide you along. Might make sense to understand what is being said and why before tackling translations.
That's an excellent book!
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
I don't attend ROCOR so I'm not sure how relevant this is, but the book "The Heavenly Banquet" by Fr. Hatzidakis has been very helpful to me. It's a detailed walkthrough of the Divine Liturgy in English with commentary, context, Scripture, etc. to guide you along. Might make sense to understand what is being said and why before tackling translations.
Thank you.

Would you recommend this to a layperson such as myself or would there be a more simple method of embracing the Liturgy?

I got lost yesterday between the two languages and I believe some parts were skipped as was stated might happen in the service book.

I'd like to be fully immersed in the beauty that I'm witnessing.
 

lskdfjldsf

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
Would you recommend this to a layperson such as myself or would there be a more simple method of embracing the Liturgy?

Yes, it's part of my catechumen reading and was recommended to me as an inquirer as well. Easy reading.

I'm in no position to speak authoritatively (this is all quite new to me as well) but can mirror what Father Josiah, Abbot Tryphon, etc. and especially my own priest told me -- take your time! You are growing a tree, not flipping a light switch. Accepting that it takes many years to understand everything is a humbling experience in itself, and that patience will help bring you closer to Christ. There are no shortcuts.
 

Aboulia

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Why are you going to Church? Is it to be entertained? Probably not. So where do you think these negative feelings are coming from? The language has nothing to do with it as long as you have print translations.

The Liturgy is not to blame. You have to do a self examination or else the temptation to stay away will increase.

How many parishes print out the entire service? None You may get the Typica, but not any of the variable parts, which constitute half the service. It is a great problem if you do not understand the language that the service is conducted in, there is no point to the Orthodox services if they cannot even be dimly grasped, it's no wonder he's becoming distracted. How does one become part of the rational sheep if one has no idea what they're doing? Did St Innocent of Alaska convert the Aleutian peoples by teaching them Russian? Did St Nicholas of Japan neglect to use Japanese in Japan? Any Orthodox Church in NA should be using English to some extent in it's services as it's the common language of the land. If I was @DRIIIVER I would be looking for services in English.
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
How many parishes print out the entire service? None You may get the Typica, but not any of the variable parts, which constitute half the service. It is a great problem if you do not understand the language that the service is conducted in, there is no point to the Orthodox services if they cannot even be dimly grasped, it's no wonder he's becoming distracted. How does one become part of the rational sheep if one has no idea what they're doing? Did St Innocent of Alaska convert the Aleutian peoples by teaching them Russian? Did St Nicholas of Japan neglect to use Japanese in Japan? Any Orthodox Church in NA should be using English to some extent in it's services as it's the common language of the land. If I was @DRIIIVER I would be looking for services in English.
I was using the service book the first few weeks, but my priest recommended that I not, so that I could immerse myself more in the Liturgy.

My issue was, as you wrote on, understanding when the priest bounced between English and Slavic.

Fortunately, my priest made a 2 hour, 2 part series on The Divine Liturgy, and what each and every moment means. He broke it down perfectly, so even though I don't understand Slavic, I know what's occurring.
 

Aboulia

Woodpecker
Orthodox
@Brebelle And that's good of your priest to tell you to do that as the book as typically formatted only has half the service in order, and focusing on the book draws away from the participating aspect. You mention that it's a multilingual service, as long as you understand one of the languages used, it is sufficient, as many things are repeated in them. There's only an issue if your church has been open for awhile and it's neglected to put the host country's language in the service.

I'm unsure whether DRIIIVER has English or not in his services. By his posts it sounds like he doesn't.
 
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