Food and Drink: Resistance Against Bugchow

Diocletian

Woodpecker
I think that one of the great failings of modern society has been the devolution of good, honest food into bugchow.

What is bugchow? It is the daily bread of the bugman, who is the man (or woman) who defines his identity and life by his pursuit of consumerism, politics, fads, etc. Roosh’s article “There Is No Identity Without Christ” describes the bugman without explicitly saying the word.

When I think of bugchow, two things come to mind.

First is the highly processed “food” that seems to be mostly salt, sugar, and laboratory chemicals flavored with a bit of chopped and formed meat or vegetables. Garbage like Chik-Fil-A, Coke, and TV dinners are the most common examples. It is produced in a factory and distributed to your local grocery store, where it sits there like a serpent just waiting to sink its fangs into you and destroy your health with it’s venom.

Second is the status-signaling food that people consume to show to others, or at least prove to themselves, that they are better than the average man. Its stuff like Impossible Burgers which are supposed to make you feel virtuous because you are not an evil meat eater, or overly fussy food made with exotic ingredients that is designed to confer upon the consumer a status above the common prole.

Post here your good, honest food and drink recipes.
 
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Diocletian

Woodpecker
I've lost a lot of weight eating raw meat dishes.

First up is Carpaccio, named for the Italian painter Vittore Carpaccio.

Pound slices of raw beef round very thin, season with a little salt and pepper, allow to sit for about 20 minutes.

Sauce:

A couple tablespoons mayonnaise
About 2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 dashes Lee and Perrins sauce
Salt
Pepper
About a half teaspoon mustard powder
About a half teaspoon cream
About a tablespoon good olive oil
About a a half teaspoon seasoned rice wine vinegar

Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning as you like it. I like it with a good lemon kick.

On a plate, arrange the beef slices around the edge and spread some sauce over them. In the middle place some arugula leaves and drizzle some good olive oil and seasoned rice wine vinegar over it. People also like it with shaved or shredded Parmesan cheese.
 
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Diocletian

Woodpecker
My second classic raw meat dish is steak tartare. There's a lot of ways to prepare it, this is what I like.

About 12 ounces beef round minced by hand, or you can use a combination of beef, bison, elk, lamb, whatever is available.

Mix this with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper.

Add:

About a teaspoon of good whole grain mustard
2 dashes Lee and Perrins sauce
2 dashes red hot sauce
About 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
About 1 tablespoon finely chopped pickles
About 1 teaspoon finely chopped capers
Ketchup is common, instead I use roughly 1 teaspoon tomato paste, 1 or 2 drops Lee and Perrins, 1 or 2 drops wine vinegar, pinch of sugar, pinch of salt
About 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh sage

In a custard cup beat an egg yolk with a little good olive oil until thick but not yet mayonnaise.

Let the beef chill in the fridge, and let the egg yolk sit for a bit after beating.

After the beef is chilled, mold a portion onto your plate into a cup. Give the egg yolk another good beating and pour into the cavity.

Prepare your toast. Take two slices good bread, toast them, then rub them with a garlic clove, then brush with good olive oil, then sprinkle some salt on it. Serve everything.
 
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Diocletian

Woodpecker
My Dry Martini

2 1/4 ounces your favorite gin
1/4 ounce dry vermouth
A drop ouzo or other anise flavored liquor

Take a martini glass and rub the inside with a strip of lemon peel, then leave the peel in the glass.

Gently stir the ingredients in a mixing cup or shaker with plenty of ice for about a minute and a half, then strain into your martini glass.

I don't know why, but I've discovered that martinis taste best if you drink them at most once every other week.
 

taurenk

Chicken
Try some polenta stacks

Take a tube of polenta and slice some of it with a cheese slicer. Fry them up in a pan. Put some ricotta cheese on half of the slices. With the remaining half of them, top with tomato sauce and shredded parmesan cheese. Place them on a baking sheet with a rack in a preheated oven for a few minutes to warm up the toppings. When you pull them out, stack the slices with the sauce on them on top of the slices topped with the ricotta. Sprinkle basil and oregano over the polenta stacks before serving.
 
I've lost a lot of weight eating raw meat dishes.

First up is Carpaccio, named for the Italian painter Vittore Carpaccio.

Pound slices of raw beef round very thin, season with a little salt and pepper, allow to sit for about 20 minutes.

Sauce:

A couple tablespoons mayonnaise
About 2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 dashes Lee and Perrins sauce
Salt
Pepper
About a half teaspoon mustard powder
About a half teaspoon cream
About a tablespoon good olive oil
About a a half teaspoon seasoned rice wine vinegar

Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning as you like it. I like it with a good lemon kick.

On a plate, arrange the beef slices around the edge and spread some sauce over them. In the middle place some arugula leaves and drizzle some good olive oil and seasoned rice wine vinegar over it. People also like it with shaved or shredded Parmesan cheese.

Did you have to get past any initial feelings about eating raw meat? I've had tartare and cubed beef a number of times, but usually when drinking. Are there any concerns related to eating raw meat? What do you like about it?
 
Try some polenta stacks

Take a tube of polenta and slice some of it with a cheese slicer. Fry them up in a pan. Put some ricotta cheese on half of the slices. With the remaining half of them, top with tomato sauce and shredded parmesan cheese. Place them on a baking sheet with a rack in a preheated oven for a few minutes to warm up the toppings. When you pull them out, stack the slices with the sauce on them on top of the slices topped with the ricotta. Sprinkle basil and oregano over the polenta stacks before serving.
I didn't know polenta is available in tubes

This seems awesome
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
Did you have to get past any initial feelings about eating raw meat? I've had tartare and cubed beef a number of times, but usually when drinking. Are there any concerns related to eating raw meat? What do you like about it?

I found a bunch of packets of fancy ground beef--the organic grass fed type--that had been put in the discount section at my local Kroger and so I was looking for something to do with it. I saw a recipe for tartare online and I figured "what the hey" and tried it. Glad I did! People eat sushi without a second thought, so why not raw beef? If you live in a country that may not have the best sanitation or health standards then yes there would definitely be some concern, but otherwise I don't really think there would be any problem. Health departments in Western countries generally will say that you should never under any circumstances eat raw beef, but keep in mind these are the same people who say that a low fat diet is good for you.

The big part of it is the taste--I just like it. On the other hand, I think you actually end up taking in fewer calories because you're not cooking the water out of the beef. You mention having tartare when drinking...the first couple times I had tartare I was also drinking but when I woke up in the morning I had almost nothing of a hangover, maybe that was because of all the water in the beef.
 

r3d

Robin
Is sea salt good? What about Kodiak Cakes? Is Gorton's a good seafood brand? https://www.gortons.com/we-are-gortons/ I'm a picky eater and I am trying to eat better.

I don't know about the rest of your post but I can comment on the salt:

Salt is salt. Don't fall for overpriced sea/himalayan/endoftheworld special salt.

Just make sure there are no additives in it (they often add chemicals to prevent clumping).

The only excuse to pay more for salt is when you're going all out on a dish and you want to have an element of texture on top. Then you can use a fleur de sel variant. But that is already a big step in the direction the OP wants to get away from.
 

andy dufresne

Kingfisher
Did you have to get past any initial feelings about eating raw meat? I've had tartare and cubed beef a number of times, but usually when drinking. Are there any concerns related to eating raw meat? What do you like about it?
A few years ago I picked up a fresh prime steak at a grocery store. I was lazy and it looked so good I started eating the thing raw. It was amazing. Everyone should try it.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Raw ground supermarket beef is a bad idea, not recommended, unless you get a fresh batch from a good butcher and eat it the same day. The bacteria that grow on the surface will get incorporated into the ground meat, and it only takes one bad sample to contaminate the whole batch.

Raw steak is a bad idea too, if you like raw meat just sear the outside on high heat for a short period, and eat it ultra-rare. You can order this at any french restaurant, the doneness level is called "bleu" or blue. Tastes better that way than completely rare,

Ethiopian restaurants serve cubed raw meat, looked a bit dodgy to me. On the other hand, a good way to enjoy near-raw beef is with meat fondue (fondue bourguignone), a quick dip of the meat into boiling oil (or even boiling broth in asian meat fondues) is enough to kill the pathogens that are mostly on the meat surface.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
What cuts of meat do you recommend? Are you pounding & slicing yourself?

I bought a whole Bison straight from farm to butcher to me. Grass Fed, visited the farm myself, animals are living good.

I took some of the ground as single grind for sausage (as opposed to double which is norm) and went to a buddies place who has a ton of sausage. I've enjoyed the meat immensely, and it was actually a decent investment as meat prices seem to be flying.

A buddy of mine butchered a deer he hunted on my farm with the help of an older retired butcher. I'm going to get my hunting license so I can get a tag for next year. I'd like to at least learn the basics of it. As the food moves to bug chow from already somewhat sketchy commercial processes, I'd like to start seeing becoming more involved with what I eat. Which can be as simple as buying farm direct or as complicated as raising your own.

I deliver hay and I am finding that is putting me in touch with alot of these homestead small producers. One guy I met has 2 cows and is really into making cheese, I had a little discussion with him where he basically told me the cheese in the grocery store on the main aisle is fake cheese. The expensive stuff laid out on that specialty cheese area is the real stuff.
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
What cuts of meat do you recommend? Are you pounding & slicing yourself?

Whatever you like. I've always seen round recommended since it has a good beefy flavor, which is what I usually use. It is also cheap. I slice it thin, lightly salt it, then allow it to air dry for a hour or so on each side before pounding which seems to make it taste a little better; not sure why, but it works. Where I live you can buy packets of ground elk and ground bison, so a combination of those is pretty tasty. The Natural Grocers near me sells packets of grass-fed beef mixed with liver and heart. I haven't tried that but I think I'll pick some up this week.

I pound and chop it myself. It only takes a few minutes and it is very satisfying! I don't have a meat mallet so I use a cleaned-out liquor bottle because those are pretty thick, put your beef slices between two oiled sheets of plastic wrap and pound away. My local Kroger's sells thin-sliced round in the meat case. Be creative. Any cheap knife that you've sharpened will work.
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
The only excuse to pay more for salt is when you're going all out on a dish and you want to have an element of texture on top. Then you can use a fleur de sel variant. But that is already a big step in the direction the OP wants to get away from.

Stuff like Morton's salt is nasty. I definitely recommend you buy stuff like fleur de sel or Himalayan salt over bugsalt. It doesn't have that industrial chemical taste that you get with iodized table salt. Even expensive salt is relatively cheap because in the end you don't use very much, its not exactly a luxury product.
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
I bought a whole Bison straight from farm to butcher to me. Grass Fed, visited the farm myself, animals are living good.

I took some of the ground as single grind for sausage (as opposed to double which is norm) and went to a buddies place who has a ton of sausage. I've enjoyed the meat immensely, and it was actually a decent investment as meat prices seem to be flying.

A buddy of mine butchered a deer he hunted on my farm with the help of an older retired butcher. I'm going to get my hunting license so I can get a tag for next year. I'd like to at least learn the basics of it. As the food moves to bug chow from already somewhat sketchy commercial processes, I'd like to start seeing becoming more involved with what I eat. Which can be as simple as buying farm direct or as complicated as raising your own.

I deliver hay and I am finding that is putting me in touch with alot of these homestead small producers. One guy I met has 2 cows and is really into making cheese, I had a little discussion with him where he basically told me the cheese in the grocery store on the main aisle is fake cheese. The expensive stuff laid out on that specialty cheese area is the real stuff.

Cheese is pretty easy to make. That's the kind of thing most people used to make themselves before we all moved into the cities and burbs in the first half of the 20th century. When you have a couple cows or goats you have to do something with all that milk. Its also a really cheap source of high-quality fat and protein. I started making it myself because at one point a couple years ago I lost my job and I realized I needed a cheap way to feed myself that didn't involve BurgerWorld garbage. Go here: https://cheesemaking.com/ for a good collection of recipes from the most simple to the most complex, and supplies. You can make it at home using pretty much anything that isn't the cheapo garbage milk from WalMart. I think the problem has to do with ultra-pasteurization. I treat every Friday as a Catholic day of fasting and abstinence, so my food before dinner consists of a glass of fermented milk. Take a gallon jug of milk and sprinkle a few grains of flor danica culture into it and let it sit on the counter at room temperature overnight, then voila you've got fermented milk that won't destroy your intestines if you've got any Mediterranean or East Asian ancestry in you.
 

r3d

Robin
Stuff like Morton's salt is nasty. I definitely recommend you buy stuff like fleur de sel or Himalayan salt over bugsalt. It doesn't have that industrial chemical taste that you get with iodized table salt. Even expensive salt is relatively cheap because in the end you don't use very much, its not exactly a luxury product.

Maybe good salt is harder to come by in some places. But here in southern Germany you can buy standard table salt without any additives for 1$ per pound.

It depends I guess and as you say it's not gonna matter all that much. Except maybe if you cook a lot of pasta for your family of 6 and use that fleur de sel to prepare your saltwater ;)
 

Tactician

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Hey, I'm not much of a chef, but here's some old posts from the Bone Broth thread:

https://www.rooshvforum.com/threads/bone-broth.3440/page-10#post-140988

You can also look up old posts by @Veloce. He's a high end chef & dropped a TON of recipes back in the day. Here's a broth recipe & a pasta recipe:

https://www.rooshvforum.com/threads/thedude3737s-recipe-book.11742/page-2#post-385918

https://www.rooshvforum.com/threads/owning-the-kitchen-and-grill.3952/#post-158796

Edit: Though mine aren't as fancy, I love bone-based stew, especially in the winter.
 
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This is a classic Russian/ Eastern European recipe I nabbed form Boris and made several times, I made it without vodka because I didn't have on hand. Served to several in my family they agreed it was a good recipe. The yield is good as well.

Cheburek is basically like a fried/ deep fried Russian meat pie. Deceptively simple to make. Very simple comfort food that is super filling. I went light on the fry oil but nevertheless still turned out great.

Recipe:

Ingredients: For dough: 1 egg 3 cups flour 1 shot of vodka 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup water sunflower seed oil For filling 400g/14oz beef or pork minced meat Some green onion, parsley and dill Some ground black pepper 2 small onions 1 clove garlic 3 teaspoons salt Serve with parsley and dill

Also, if anyone is into Eastern European food, I can post my go-to kvass recipe (low alcohol beer/ soda).
 
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