Germany has gone insane

IM3000

Pelican
(Normie) Germans are by far some of the most brainwashed people you'll ever meet. This nation is beyond saving. I have German ancestry and this makes me sad. I don't think that there'll be a proper civil war in Europe though, just look at the demographics. Nobody is there to fight it long term.

I believe that Germany, Europe and the West in general will become more like Brazil et al. I.e. large (mostly brown) underclass, small middle class and a tiny upper class. It won't be pretty for the average Hans.
 

Galaxy_Traveler

Robin
Other Christian
The Germans are tragic people. The only country were the occupy wallstreet demonstrations in 2008 were registered. In other words, out of all the countries this movement was holding demos in, the Germans were the only ones who meekly asked for permission to demonstrate. This is not the attitude of citizens but of subjects.
They are used to being subjected and controlled so much that any thought of objecting against their rulers is suppressed. The Germans are the perfect vassals: They do not need much policing, they police themselves.

Say what you want about the French, but they don't even think about asking for permission when demonstrating or going on strike.

What you see happening in Europe is that the governments have moved from having no fear of their citizens to showing utter contempt for their subjects. This was the reason for having a second Amendment in the US constitution, and Thomas Jefferson's famous 'tree of liberty' quote: The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.

There is no denying: There are not enough patriots, but there is no shortage of tyrants.
 

Transsimian

Ostrich
Gold Member
Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-R1220-401%2C_Erich_Honecker_%28cropped%29.jpg

Miss me yet?
To be honest, I was tempted to post another "Socialist" German leader, who purged the military, took absolute power, and their actions brought chaos across the continent, bombs on German streets, and ultimately led to Germany being invaded by millions. Should I post her?
 

El Draque

Pelican
Orthodox
Churchill said of the Germans "they never kill their leaders", when others talked of possibility of a successful attempt on Hitlers life in the final days of war. Now we still have broadly the same people ethnically, but the social engineering & full spectrum guilt-trip of the last 70 year has rendered upon them the most utterly malign, self destructive leadership imaginable.

But then there is still a lot of that Prussian stock in there, i can't believe they would go down without a fight, as the horrors of the coming decades begin to unfurl. Maybe it will just be a case of when they turn, they really turn.

Either way, it won't be pretty.
 

Tradcatholic

Robin
Catholic
Churchill said of the Germans "they never kill their leaders", when others talked of possibility of a successful attempt on Hitlers life in the final days of war. Now we still have broadly the same people ethnically, but the social engineering & full spectrum guilt-trip of the last 70 year has rendered upon them the most utterly malign, self destructive leadership imaginable.

But then there is still a lot of that Prussian stock in there, i can't believe they would go down without a fight, as the horrors of the coming decades begin to unfurl. Maybe it will just be a case of when they turn, they really turn.

Either way, it won't be pretty.
Maybe East Germany can vote to become part of Poland. That leaves the problem of Berlin. I guess it can be divided again.
 

Bird

Pelican
Catholic
Maybe East Germany can vote to become part of Poland. That leaves the problem of Berlin

I read somewhere that here in Saxony one third of the populace would support a secession from Berlin / Germany and I like the idea, too. Saxony is also neighbor with Czechia. Both Poland and Czechia are not that stupid to shut down their coal-fired power plants like Germany does in the months and years to come.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
This is fake news. The new chairman of Merkel's party is ex Blackrock, the new chancellor is not.

It's not "fake news" since the CDU, Merkel's party, has been and is still the major party in the coalition in power in Germany, and its chairman is a Blackrock tool, arguably at least as much power than the new Chancellor. You're taking a page out of the Snopes disinfo playbook.

This is the guy who will be pulling the shots within Germany's most powerful political party:

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Angela Merkel's rival Friedrich Merz and the vast, shadowy power of BlackRock​


The sheer scale of BlackRock's finances makes its influence on the world unlike that of any other company. Now one of its board members in Germany, Friedrich Merz, wants to succeed Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Friedrich Merz, Angela Merkel's old political rival, is out to replace her as head of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and potentially the German government. If successful, he would be the first German leader to come directly out of the so-called shadow banking system, and the first leader to have previously been a highly paid lobbyist for a global financial institution.

Shadow banks are generally defined as financial institutions that work like banks but aren't subject to the same regulatory systems. Their growing power, which dwarfs the likes of Amazon, Facebook and Google (all of which BlackRock invests money in) means that financial market speculation has become one of the biggest movers of money in the world.

Many critics of the market system believe this destabilizes the world economy by incentivizing risk, the trade in bad loans, and investing via unregulated markets, known as "dark pools." The rise of shadow banking has been blamed for causing the subprime mortgage catastrophe of 2007-2008 and the global recession that followed.

Merz heads the supervisory board of the German branch of BlackRock, the biggest asset management corporation in the world, which controls some $6.3 trillion (€5.56 trillion) in assets — twice Germany's gross domestic product.

Two venerable German researchers, political scientist Peter Grottian and finance expert Werner Rügemer, appeared in Berlin on Wednesday to warn against letting Merz take control of the German government. Working independently of any university, the two men produced a dossier on BlackRock and Merz because they believe the shadow banking system is not being properly explained in the media even with Merz as a frontrunner to replace Merkel.

Dark pools and shadow banks

BlackRock is the "biggest organizer of capital in the Western world," Rügemer said at a press conference on Wednesday. He said it owns shares (on behalf of customers) in some 18,000 companies, including "all 30 German DAX companies, of course."

The 14-page dossier claims that BlackRock is the global leader in a number of financial operations that specifically aid the super-rich: organizing shell companies (it manages more letterbox firms than anyone else in the world), dealing in "dark pool" financial markets (unregulated markets where major financial institutions trade securities), and creating near monopolies (such as the takeover of agrochemical conglomerate Monsanto by pharmaceutical giant Bayer, completed this year).

The CDU and the capitalists

BlackRock's activities have attracted the attention of the authorities. Police searched BlackRock's offices in Munich earlier this month as part of an investigation into the "cum-ex" tax evasion scandal, which cost European taxpayers some €55 billion. That investigation is related to the period from 2007 to 2011, five years before Merz joined the company.

Rügemer says that "small scandals" like this are only made possible by a lucrative business that BlackRock is heavily involved in — the short-term lending of shares.

"They are lent to other members in the financial market for a day, for two weeks or maybe three months," said Rügemer, "so that these lenders can do more business with those shares and evade taxes by claiming tax rebates they never paid in the first place."

CDU politicians have always maintained a close relationship with Germany's major corporations, but the academics believe that Merz's candidacy for the leadership threatens a completely new kind of influence. "The power of capital in CDU governments was always more or less hidden, and it never aspired to direct representation in the top political positions," said Rügemer. "But that's different with Merz. The fact that the most highly paid lobbyist of BlackRock is not just going to the chancellery and saying, 'Please don't make such tough laws,' but that he himself wants to be CDU leader and chancellor — that's the difference."

Merz presents his successful finance career, which developed in his nine-year absence from politics, as an advantage in the CDU leadership race. If the polls can be believed, many party members seem to agree. "Of course they do," said Rügemer, "because they don't know that BlackRock is destroying the economy."

Influence on public policy

Grottian called the publicity that Merz's candidacy for the CDU has created an "opportunity," because so much of BlackRock's power derives from the way it works under the media radar. "We already see from BlackRock's press releases that all this is getting a little dangerous for them, that they're coming out of the darkness," he said. "They don't want that. This debate really should start now."

BlackRock
BlackRock's office in Munich was raided by German police in early November

"If this had been a traditional locust company that had pounced on rising rents or property developments, we would have noticed," he added. "But this way we don't see it."

Other researchers have previously come to similar conclusions about BlackRock. "There has never been a company like BlackRock before," said Heike Buchter, who published a book on the company in 2015, in a recent interview with the IPG Journal. "No one else has comparable access to companies, governments, regulators and central banks than BlackRock."

The financial power wielded by BlackRock is illustrated by the merger of Bayer and Monsanto, which was approved by the EU earlier this year. BlackRock is a major shareholder in both companies. "They organized that merger in the last few years. … And their business model is not about expecting a dividend at the end of the year, but the constant speculation of their shares rising and falling in these companies," said Rügemer.

The dossier also claims to explain how BlackRock's influence on companies extends into policymaking: It has recently become heavily invested in companies that have bought up public housing in the past two decades, which is driving up rents in all of Germany's cities, while at the same time lobbying to keep rent caps weak. Similarly, BlackRock is a major shareholder in Amazon, which is resisting any deal with trade unions in Germany.

This all chimes with Merz's career and politics: He has sat on the boards of several major companies, including Commerzbank, HSBC, the insurance company AXA, and the German real estate developer IVG. During his career as a Bundestag member, he opposed the minimum wage and argued for cutting social benefits and limiting the power of trade unions. His possible ascension to the chancellery would therefore grant the financial power broker unprecedented control of Europe's largest economy.
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IM3000

Pelican
I'm not trying to defend this guy, nor his party or Mama Merkel. But the tweet you posted is false info. This dude is not the new chancellor. The guy below is.

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Not that it makes a difference. It doesn't matter who runs the brothel, the johns are always the same.
 

cosine

Robin
One of my German friends is rather nationalistic, but he prefers to verbalize pride of his Bavarian heritage.

I've heard even Spaniards saying, "If you say you are a proud American, people think that's fine, but if you say you are a proud Spaniard, they ask, 'Are you fascist?'"

"The Strange Death of Europe" by Douglas Murray is fascinating. I think it is good that Europeans recognize the horrors of the 20th century, but they take it to the point of self-loathing and self-flagellation.
 
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