Getting a job as a freshly graduate in corona time

Jose Pedro

Chicken
Hi everybody,
I've been lurking on this forum for a long time ago, and I need some advice. Maybe this post should belong to the "Coronavirus" subforum, for obvious reasons; therefore, I'm sorry if I posted on the wrong subforum and I'd like the moderators to move this post to the right subforum.

I'm going to graduate in mechanical engineering in September (just a bachelors degree). I'm studying in a Spanish university, and I plan on leaving Spain ASAP, because of the high youth unemployment rate that there is here, poor salaries we have and messed up split shifts. Unfortunately I still depend on my parents for living, I'm unemployed and have no money, which means that going for paid courses is a no-no for me, because they don't want to pay any for any further education that I might require in order to improve my employability.

For clarification purposes, I want you to know that in Spanish universities, engineering studies are mostly about theory, and you learn very little valuable skills in real life. In my case, I can do some things on Solidworks, some CFD (not the Forex one), and some C programming. I started learning Python but couldn't delve deeper because of the studies; apart from that, I know how to run some FEA simulations for structural elements.

Apart from that, Spain is on its way of becoming a socialist paradise in Europe, and people here actually vote for it to happen, so I'm quite interested on leaving the country whenever possible.

Problem is that we are living this scamdemic of covid 1984, and I was told by a relative of mine who is in the corporate world (he's working in a multinational automotive firm) that non-vaxxed people are not going to be hired. My parents, firm believers of all the official narrative also tell me I won't be hired anywhere unless I take the vaccine. Therefore, leaving is not going to be so easy or simple.

I am not going to take the vaccine no matter what, so I know I'll have a hard time looking for jobs.
I'd like to know what valuable skills could I learn, and in what first world countries is it possible to work without covid passports. This second questions implies not needing a covid passport for travelling to said country. I don't want to forge documents. Do you guys know any website where one can work as a freelancer? Can it be a good idea looking for jobs in foreign companies and working from home? If I have more doubs I'll post them.

Thanks in advance for your advice, sorry if my English is a bit broken, and if there is any of you in a similar situation, don't hesitate to post here, maybe this post can become useful in the future.

Best regards
 

kel

Ostrich
The good news is you have a degree which, I think, is not total BS and is in a relatively in-demand field.

The bad news is your work might require "in person" a bit more than, say, a programming job.

Nonetheless, I'd encourage you to start by just trying to find remote work, which should be easier right now. If they ask tbh just lie I'd say. "You're vaxxed right?" "Oh, I'm all good" and move on, push back any sort of "need proof for in-office" stuff until it becomes a real problem and at that point try to insist on continuing remote work.

You say you want to leave Spain, fair enough, but given you are authorized to work anywhere in the EU and right now a lot of places are remote anyways I'd see if you can avoid that right now. Again, I'd just lie if I were you. If you see a nice potential job in Amsterdam, just tell them you live in Amsterdam or nearby. Once you're in getting rid of a you is a lot harder and if you're producing value even a woke boss will be motivated to feign ignorance and let you slide.
 
If I could do it over, I would go straight to construction labor. Though I graduated shortly after '08 recession and was laughed out of the most entry-level construction helper positions

Having income and a purpose will give you sense of peace while you search for career positions in your free time

Mechanical engineering -> industrial projects, water treatment plants, vertical commercial/residential construction
 

Parmesan

Woodpecker
I can’t speak for Europe, but despite all the hype, white collar STEM is very oversubscribed in America, and the competition is brutal. My friend has a small consultancy, and got hundreds of over qualified applicants after posting a job over a mere weekend. I’d suspect the situation is similar in the EU. You could see if there are places in the EU that are in needs of specific mechanical/electrical trades, as your background would probably make such training quite natural. I can’t imagine the hospitality industry is doing well in Spain right now, but hotels are fun places to work as a young man while you sort things out, and while the pay isn’t remarkable, you could possibly work as an in house junior engineer/maintenance guy to keep your skills growing. I’d start saving some money, maybe investing a small bit in crypto or something along those lines.
 

Jose Pedro

Chicken
The good news is you have a degree which, I think, is not total BS and is in a relatively in-demand field.

The bad news is your work might require "in person" a bit more than, say, a programming job.

Nonetheless, I'd encourage you to start by just trying to find remote work, which should be easier right now. If they ask tbh just lie I'd say. "You're vaxxed right?" "Oh, I'm all good" and move on, push back any sort of "need proof for in-office" stuff until it becomes a real problem and at that point try to insist on continuing remote work.

You say you want to leave Spain, fair enough, but given you are authorized to work anywhere in the EU and right now a lot of places are remote anyways I'd see if you can avoid that right now. Again, I'd just lie if I were you. If you see a nice potential job in Amsterdam, just tell them you live in Amsterdam or nearby. Once you're in getting rid of a you is a lot harder and if you're producing value even a woke boss will be motivated to feign ignorance and let you slide.
Didn't consider remote work, I'll take this into account. Great way to save money while getting experience and not being thrown out of home.


learn something practical, like mechanic, electrician, plumbing, carpenter, etc.
I'll consider it once I have money for living on my own for a while, what a scam university is...


If I could do it over, I would go straight to construction labor. Though I graduated shortly after '08 recession and was laughed out of the most entry-level construction helper positions

Having income and a purpose will give you sense of peace while you search for career positions in your free time

Mechanical engineering -> industrial projects, water treatment plants, vertical commercial/residential construction
I was laughing this out too all the time thinking I'm overqualified for this. Seems I have to broaden my views...



I can’t speak for Europe, but despite all the hype, white collar STEM is very oversubscribed in America, and the competition is brutal. My friend has a small consultancy, and got hundreds of over qualified applicants after posting a job over a mere weekend. I’d suspect the situation is similar in the EU. You could see if there are places in the EU that are in needs of specific mechanical/electrical trades, as your background would probably make such training quite natural. I can’t imagine the hospitality industry is doing well in Spain right now, but hotels are fun places to work as a young man while you sort things out, and while the pay isn’t remarkable, you could possibly work as an in house junior engineer/maintenance guy to keep your skills growing. I’d start saving some money, maybe investing a small bit in crypto or something along those lines.
I've put some very tiny amounts of money in Bitcoin and will keep doing that for sure. Again, thanks for broadening my views, didn't consider the maintenance because there are less qualified studies (higher level than high school though) here that teach you about industrial maintenance.

Thank you all for your help, I'll keep you updated should I get a job, move out, etc
 

Aboulia

Woodpecker
Orthodox
If I could do it over, I would go straight to construction labor. Though I graduated shortly after '08 recession and was laughed out of the most entry-level construction helper positions

Having income and a purpose will give you sense of peace while you search for career positions in your free time

Mechanical engineering -> industrial projects, water treatment plants, vertical commercial/residential construction

I might second this, just on the basis that you might come up with something to design and improve, potentially patent and make a killing. Apply in construction fields that are relevant to an area you have interest in.
 

Parmesan

Woodpecker
I was laughing this out too all the time thinking I'm overqualified for this. Seems I have to broaden my views...
No offense, but I’d suggest you check your ego while you are still young. You admitted yourself your degree was mostly a joke. I don’t know about Europe, but skilled construction work can pay pretty decent in the US, and you can progress in your career quickly if you are a strong worker. Doesn’t have to be construction, but I’d suggest dropping the ego and entitlement and come prepared to pay your dues and learn some skills, whatever the role may be. Nobody gives a shit about your degree. Not trying to mean, but that’s the reality, and frankly I wish somebody told me the same when I was younger.
 
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