Good homemade bread recipes without bread machines?

911

Peacock
Gold Member
So I've got a 10lb bag of flour, and got ahold of some yeast, which has been just about the hottest item at the supermarket. It looks like the yeast supplies have finally arrived, and the stores are now stacking large flour bags that seemed to be destined for the ailing restaurant market.

I'm looking to try some homemade bread without a machine, anyone tried some good recipes?
 
I use this recipe, and really like it:
8 cups flour
4 cups warm water
2 tbsp salt
2 tbsp yeast
Mix it together, let it rise for two hours, beat it down and seperate into two loaves, let it rise again for 45 minutes, then bake at 450 for 25-30 minutes. It's the easiest recipe I've used, and it's pretty good. You can also get away with 1 tbsp yeast but you might have to let it rise longer.


They bake it in circles, but I prefer to use bread pans for easy sandwich making.
 
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Stumbled upon this somehow, no-knead bread in a cast iron dutch oven. First time it came out exactly like in the video, and it's been perfect every time and is simplicity in itself. 12 hours to raise, total 45 minutes in the oven, actual preparation time is about 3 minutes.

3 cups flour, 1 1/2 c water, 1tsp salt, 1 tsp sugar, 1/4 tsp yeast.


It slices very easily once it's cooled; I like to prepare it in the morning, bake it at night and let it cool then slice it in the morning. Will last me a couple of days.
 

kel

Pelican
This one was a minor sensation a few years ago. It's easy:

 
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911

Peacock
Gold Member
If you add eggs to a bread recipe, you get a brioche, or for you (((pollack))) types ,challah-like bread, which is great especially with a bit of coarse sugar on top, but it's not regular bread.
 

Matianus

Sparrow
I have ordered a bread machine but it won't ship for a few months.

For those of you who have made bread with a bread machine and in a normal oven, which method do you prefer and why?
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
I don't have a bread machine, but I would guess it's more for the sandwich bread type than a french-style bread with a hard crust, because that's the kind of bread east Asians like.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
I use this recipe, and really like it:
8 cups flour
4 cups warm water
2 tbsp salt
2 tbsp yeast
Mix it together, let it rise for two hours, beat it down and seperate into two loaves, let it rise again for 45 minutes, then bake at 450 for 25-30 minutes. It's the easiest recipe I've used, and it's pretty good. You can also get away with 1 tbsp yeast but you might have to let it rise longer.


They bake it in circles, but I prefer to use bread pans for easy sandwich making.



I tried this but got a bit of a sticky miss trying to handle the dough, and the breads turned out to be very flat and with a very hard crust, as opposed to a crunchy one. I used 1 yeast packet with 4 cups flower, that might have been too little. But overall the video is too quick and doesn't go over the hard parts deep enough. They made a longer video where they got into better detail about their bread recipe:



This is a good video, similar recipe, but she describes better the kind of consistency the dough should have, and how to handle and shape the individual bread dough balls, and as a bonus how to make a Greek-style pita flatbread in 3 minutes on stovetop with an iron skillet:

 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
On my second try, the bread came out GREAT, I used an oval-shaped ball to make a longer, larger loaf than the ones shown above, and used the recommendation from the second video to shape a better ball that expanded well and yielded a nice loaf with crunchy crust and a lush inside. The two recipes above are almost identical but the woman below does a better job going over the details in a shorter video. Haven't tried the pita yet.

Advantages:

-hot/warm/fresh bread is awesome, tastes much better than supermarket bread and almost as good as a high-end French artisan bakery shop.

-super cheap, comes to less than 50 cents/large loaf, and even less if you buy flour in bulk. I've noticed that currently flour is very cheap in bulk sizes because demand from restaurants is much lower than usual, their suppliers are now using supermarkets to move their inventories. I usually buy my loaves for nearly $4/loaf or $2 for a slim baguette at a local bakery.

On the subject of price, don't buy the overpriced Fleischman brand yeast in the small container or the trifold packs, which cost something like $1 per tablespoon, get a large package for $3-$5 instead from a different store. Those packages are from companies that produced yeast for bakeries and restaurants, and are now selling these smaller packages or 250g-500g to supermarkets and specialty stores.

-you can make a large batch of dough in advance and keep it stored in your fridge for up to 10 days or more, grab a chunk and form it into a ball, let it rest for 45min then bake for 30min and let it cool for 15min. In other words, you can get fresh bread in less than 2hrs with little work. You get around 5-6 loaves with the 8 cup flour recipe above, or 3-4 large loaves with "Nini Girl"s recipe above. It's actually less work to make your own bread from a batch in your fridge than to go out and but it at the store.

Disadvantages:
-some prep time involved
-slightly messy, the dough is very gooey
-harder to slice vs already sliced supermarket bread (but no big deal if you get a proper serrated slicing knife)

All in all it's a great thing, highly recommend. You'll get it down by the 3rd attempt.

I think the bread you get from a machine is more like the softer-crust sandwich bread, if you prefer this. I like the regular, real bread better, and use it for sandwiches too, with thicker, toasted slices.
 

Mycelium

Robin
Gold Member
Here's the most alkaline, clean way to get roti-style breads:

Spelt Flour
Sea Salt
Cayenne
Grapeseed Oil

You can choose to add dill, thyme, cheese, etc depending on your flavoring choice. All you do is coat your pan with oil, roll the dough flat, change sides every 1-2 minutes on medium-heat.
 
You might also try making pasta. Homemade is superior to store-bought, but about the same price to make. A 1 cup of flour to 1 egg ratio is all it takes with a pinch of salt. Impresses the ladies too.
 
Interesting. You'd need a pasta machine I guess.
Actually, no. If you don't mind your food a bit more "farmhouse," you can roll it flat and use a pizza cutter to make ribbons. Just be sure to flour both sides before placing the cut pasta in a bowl. Keeps them from sticking.
 

Diocletian

Sparrow
Get yourself a copy of this book; in fact, get the whole series if you have the money. Fantastic old-fashioned recipes from around the world. They're long out of print but you can find copies on Amazon and Ebay.

 
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I use this recipe, and really like it:
8 cups flour
4 cups warm water
2 tbsp salt
2 tbsp yeast
Mix it together, let it rise for two hours, beat it down and seperate into two loaves, let it rise again for 45 minutes, then bake at 450 for 25-30 minutes. It's the easiest recipe I've used, and it's pretty good. You can also get away with 1 tbsp yeast but you might have to let it rise longer.
I tried that. I put in 4 cups of flour and 4 cups of warm water (minus a bit because it got a bit too sloppy). Then I added about 1.5 tbspns of yeast, and 1 tbspn of salt, because 2 seemed a bit too much. When kneading, I had to use a lot of extra flour.

Then I put it in a bowl with a damp cloth over it for 45 minutes. Then I kneaded it again and I used even more flour because it was quite damp. Then I left it overnight, and the next day I put it in the oven at a medium heat for 45 minutes, checking it from time to time.

It looks good, but it's very, very thick, and it doesn't have a strong bread smell. I guess I should have put more yeast, then it would have come out lighter. Maybe I should have used less flour too but it's hard when it keeps sticking to the surface. It's really thick and heavy. And it's massive. Once I've fed the 5,000 with this thing (which I should easily be able to do without divine intervention) I'll try again.
 
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