"Good Neighborhood" Location Resources

Looking to start a thread on those looking to relocate but aren't sure how to start looking.

For example, I'm looking to live in a neighborhood with a general nearby non-white minority population of 10% or less (One of the few ways you can easily determine if a neighborhood is good or not) and a resource that allows me to quickly gage population demographics is justicemap.org. Not sure who developed this tool or for what the goal behind it was, but it seems pretty effective at gaging local population demographics. It can also gage the income of an area.

In addition, many places don't have easy access to real estate with large acreage. For example, someone such as myself would like a large backyard to do gardening/general prep related activities. Does anyone have any tools to see if real estate in an area tends to have decent sized backyards?

Feel free to pose any related questions/resources for what you think makes for a relatively good neighborhood.
 
Does anyone have any tools to see if real estate in an area tends to have decent sized backyards?

I don't know any tools aside from using the real estate websites to filter by lot size. However, you should get in your car and learn the area around and beyond your entire metro. Driving around you'll get a good idea of which areas are more rural and have larger lots vs just suburban developments or urban-like areas.

Edit: Also map apps can be helpful in learning the history of your state and which areas are less developed.
 
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SlickyBoy

Hummingbird
One thing I learned was the appearances of a neighborhood are not always reliable. Sure, if you see burglar bars on every window, they are there for a reason. But even without those obvious signs, a decent looking neighborhood can have higher than expected crime rates. I've found the best way is to call the police department directly on the non-emergency line, get a better chance of having a real cop answer and ask what the worst areas are, which places might be worse than most people realize, etc.

It works even better if you have a chance to chat with a cop in person, in a shop, on the street or wherever, just keep the questions short and to the point. Sometimes they'll tell you more than their supposed to, especially if they're in a woke city with policies against publishing mug shots, like San Fran for example. Why you would be interested in moving to a woke city these days is another question, but the practice stands - ask the people who live the stats every day.

Oh - and if you are going to be in the area a while, you could also buy a police scanner and listen to it for a week or so. The dispatcher has no choice but to mention addresses of what's going down, and where.


If you're wondering about lot size, Google maps can help with that, as well as give you some advanced reconnaissance as to what the area looks like. They may blur the faces of who lives in those neighborhoods, but you will get an idea about the socioeconomic background.
 
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Easy_C

Peacock
Oh - and if you are going to be in the area a while, you could also buy a police scanner and listen to it for a week or so. The dispatcher has no choice but to mention addresses of what's going down, and where.
You don’t even need to buy that. Scanners in mobile at cities can be streamed.
 

SlickyBoy

Hummingbird
You don’t even need to buy that. Scanners in mobile at cities can be streamed.
Yeah, they used to work a lot better, and I suppose it depends where you live - all depends if there is a scanner hobbyist who broadcasts that city over the app. That's what made me consider getting an actual scanner versus depending upon others.
 

CDRhodes

Sparrow
If you see adult males riding bikes for transportation rather than exercise (hipsters don’t count) it’s a good indicator of a bad neighborhood. A place with a “Community Center or Community Resource Center” is also usually not the best of places. A nearby Church’s or Popeyes Chicken is also a bad sign. Lots of foot traffic, people just hanging around during business hours, etc. I got pretty good at spotting a sketch neighborhood from my cop days, but it’s really just common sense and being aware.
 
Real estate agents won't tell you the crime rates of neighborhoods in several states I visited. It's almost as if they want a family of white suckers to move into a black or junkie infested neighborhood to get screwed on purpose. For as much as I don't advocate interacting with the zookeepers, they have considerable intel on where all the good places to live are.
 
I am writing this unironically but the most crime-ridden areas are mixed residential neighborhoods. That is, a large neighborhood with single family homes, multifamily homes (eg duplexes), vacant lots (ie no house built), and trailers randomly next to each other with high % of rental occupancy and in close proximity to local social services.
 
By law real estate agents can't tell you certain things:

Crime statistics and details about schools can be interpreted as references to race – a violation of the Fair Housing Act – which is why Relman says a real estate agent won't tell you about crime in a neighborhood.
One resource is to look up "[county name] appraisal district" on Google then look at plots of land on the country website. You can see house specs, lot size, deed info, tax info etc. Usually aerial photos with house blueprints are on there.

Next-door social medial platform is awesome source of info but you have to create a fake account because they are Orwellian in terms of verifying you. It is pretty difficult. People are grouped by neighborhood and they gossip about everything. I won't detail you with info on creating a fake next door account because it's pretty painstaking stuff.
 
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