Good states to live in the United States

Once I finish graduate school, I plan on relocating. Fortunately, I picked a career with pretty high job prospects so I will be able to move to basically any state. I currently live in New Jersey with my family, and it is sad how much this state has fallen. There are so many Indians and Asians here, many of which who barely speak English and are not Americans as far as I am concerned. The women here are often unattractive and even the "attractive" ones are generally shallow and unattractive inwardly. It's also pretty rare to meet guys that I resonate with, although I was finally starting to since I've been going to church. Now that it is closed, I am basically isolated, although I do use this opportunity to get closer to God and develop spiritually.

I like the mountains a lot, so I was considering Montana. I've been to Colorado and found it beautiful, but I am not sure if I will run into many of the same problems as NJ in Colorado. I've also considered Oregon/Washington, as well as New Hampshire. I am curious if anybody here has some perspective on the matter. I'm really looking forward to getting out of this state, as it seems to only be getting worse over time. I'm a friendly and adaptable guy, but I wouldn't want to move to a place where people are hostile to outsiders. I want a place that has a good community feel, so that I can have people to network with and develop gifts of the spirit to share within my community. One of my goals is to buy land after a couple years of working, and build up on it/farm on it. I'd love to meet the right woman and settle down, but I also am open to basically living a more monk-like life if that is what God wills for me. I think I will have much better luck finding the right woman in a state that isn't quite so degenerate.

Any opinions or thoughts are welcome.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Idaho looks like the best state, it's got good weather, great outdoors, good farmland and the influx of new residents are escapees from blue state degeneracy. The other good thing is that it is affordable, and a growing state, so your real estate investment will grow. It's an important consideration as you're starting out, economics are important. Don't live like a monk, make your mark and build a strong, large healthy family in a strong community.

One important factor in your decision is proximity to your relatives. Being completely isolated from extended family or cultural/ethnic/church community is not ideal.
 

username

Ostrich
Gold Member
Idaho is very intriguing. Idaho has seen a huge swarm of people relocating to there recently. I like that Idaho doesn't really have any ethnic groups (besides Native Americans) claiming it to be their land or their territory in the past like how Hispanics claim CA, AZ, NM, and TX. It also isn't very hospitable to new comers and doesn't feature many "make work" jobs that are found in lots of other places. If you go there you better have money or something to offer otherwise you will fail. It also hasn't, at least not yet, attracted the Austin, TX or Boulder, CO crowd that move in and liberalize the shit out of the place.
 
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I've been wondering about parts of Oregon and Michigan (not the biggest cities, obviously). Input from posters on these would be useful and interesting.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Wyoming is the most conservative state hands down.

Most solid Republican state, 68% Trump, several counties in excess of 80% Trump: https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2016/results/president
I think they have the most homeschooled kids, but can't see good data on that
Highest guns per capita, close to 500% the guns per capita of the 2nd most armed state: https://mycountry955.com/how-heavily-armed-is-wyoming/
Lowest abortion rate in the country, about 1% and only one abortuary: https://worldpopulationreview.com/state-rankings/abortion-rates-by-state
Good economic growth and freedom: https://www.alec.org/press-release/...ness-index-reveals-national-pro-growth-trend/
Affordable housing: https://worldpopulationreview.com/state-rankings/cheapest-states-to-live-in
 
Idaho looks like the best state, it's got good weather, great outdoors, good farmland and the influx of new residents are escapees from blue state degeneracy. The other good thing is that it is affordable, and a growing state, so your real estate investment will grow. It's an important consideration as you're starting out, economics are important. Don't live like a monk, make your mark and build a strong, large healthy family in a strong community.

One important factor in your decision is proximity to your relatives. Being completely isolated from extended family or cultural/ethnic/church community is not ideal.
I appreciate the encouragement. Living as a monk is my backup plan if I don't meet the right woman. I have faith in living a righteous, good, and spiritually rich life. I also know I have good qualities as a husband. Yet, maybe because of where I live currently, I am a bit cynical when it comes to meeting women. I won't give up anytime soon, especially if I relocate and hopefully have access to less degenerate/indoctrinated women.
 
Wyoming is the most conservative state hands down.

Most solid Republican state, 68% Trump, several counties in excess of 80% Trump: https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2016/results/president
I think they have the most homeschooled kids, but can't see good data on that
Highest guns per capita, close to 500% the guns per capita of the 2nd most armed state: https://mycountry955.com/how-heavily-armed-is-wyoming/
Lowest abortion rate in the country, about 1% and only one abortuary: https://worldpopulationreview.com/state-rankings/abortion-rates-by-state
Good economic growth and freedom: https://www.alec.org/press-release/...ness-index-reveals-national-pro-growth-trend/
Affordable housing: https://worldpopulationreview.com/state-rankings/cheapest-states-to-live-in
I've considered Wyoming but only if I could go to a mountainous part of the state. Geography is important to me, and my favorite environments are mountains, but I also like large bodies of water (whether oceans or a larger lake). Have you traveled or lived there? If so, what did you think of the people there?
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Moderator
I know they're closed right now, but have you considered the church community where you want to move? Having an active, devout congregation to join is a huge benefit. Landscape, job market, women, politics...all of this will seem irrelevant if you pick a place with no church options, and you're cornered into a pozzed up congregation.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Have you traveled or lived there? If so, what did you think of the people there?
I'm not an American. I've only been to Florida. Last time in '19 seemed like a different country. First went in '96.

Don't be fooled by the Indian name. Wyoming just feels white. I'm pretty sure all those states up there like Montana and The Dakotas will be the safest from degenerecy and immigration.

I saw a Guardian documentary about supporters of The Orange Man in WY. The guy was terrified of the people and they weren't impressed with his noodling about.

Even the Democrips have to trigger signal in WY. As if the Dem platform has anything in common with this:


Personally, I am looking at EE. Don't expect any demographic shift there.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
There has been a lot of info on Idaho on here. I would move there in a heartbeat. Its been a favorite spot for my family since the 80's, and its only grown on me more in the past 5 years or so as much of the other spots in the PNW fall apart.

But there are lots of great spots around here, it just depends on what is important.

Keep in mind that as California loses its mind, the exodus will ramp up. I remember people in Bend, OR talking about this. In small cities, it doesn't take much to tip the scales into mini Cali. This is what turned me off of Boise. Perhaps I was looking for it, but many of the young families I met had moved from Cali, and were quick to tell me that, "We aren't like the other Californians". Yet there they all were, hanging out together, overpaying on real estate, and telling everyone who would listen that they "aren't like other Californians". But that rot seems so deep, that I bet they still can't help but vote progressive on all things.
 
I looked at the housing market in Idaho recently. All of it is pretty much ridiculously overpriced due to people flooding the state. We're talking 350k - 400k or more for a basic cookie cutter tiny one story house, both in Boise and the panhandle area. Pretty crappy.

Redpilled conservatives should still make an effort to move there (as well as Montana, Wyoming etc) and set up a 'stronghold' so to speak, though, in my opinion. BLM/Antifa nutjobs (who were supposedly bused in from Seattle or Portland) tried to hold a rally in Boise, and they were outnumbered by the counter-protesting locals who wouldn't tolerate their antics, so that should tell you something. It ought to stay that way.

As far as hostile locals and no jobs -- that part is mostly true. I believe the locals are fed up with all the newcomers moving to the state. Can't really blame them. Yeah, you should definitely have a backup plan and have your finances lined up before coming though. On the up side, lots of tech companies are apparently moving to Boise, so anyone in tech should be able to find work. That might be a double-edged sword though, if H-1B visas aren't canceled. lol
 

Errol

Pigeon
I currently live in New Jersey with my family, and it is sad how much this state has fallen.
Agreed, get out of New Jersey!
The state is irrecoverably lost except for small pockets that cost a fortune to live in.
Rather than put up with a state that is against you, you should take the fruits of your labor elsewhere.

If all your family is still there though, I wouldn't suggest going so far away that you will basically drift apart.
I agree, New Hampshire is worth considering, as well as Maine if you like real wilderness (though the coastline is pretty blue, but still nice).
Western PA also has beautiful mountains, cheap cost of living, and some decent job prospects if you are strategic enough about it.
I suggest these places since you can casually scout them out now on the weekends and once you relocate, your new home is never more than half a day's drive from your family.

I haven't explored much of West Virginia, but the latest Killstream interview with Peter Brimelow made me think red-pilled men should all descend on Berkeley Springs and turn it into a family-friendly resort town for red-blooded Americans:
https://www.thedailybeast.com/berke...reaks-out-after-vdare-founder-buys-its-castle
At the very least, I think vdare readers with mobile employment should be considering this (there have got to at least be a handful on this forum), and pooling their resources together there to build something great.

Redpilled conservatives should still make an effort to move there (as well as Montana, Wyoming etc) and set up a 'stronghold' so to speak, though, in my opinion. BLM/Antifa nutjobs (who were supposedly bused in from Seattle or Portland) tried to hold a rally in Boise, and they were outnumbered by the counter-protesting locals who wouldn't tolerate their antics, so that should tell you something. It ought to stay that way.
Indeed, where are our strongholds?
I used to think the bigger towns in the Old South were, but the actions of the last few weeks has thoroughly debunked that myth.
Which major towns in the US will people stand-up to protect Columbus or Stonewall Jackson monuments?
Or that protesters are so outnumbered they know they will get their asses kicked if they do touch them?
Are there any such places besides Boise?
If such places do exist, that is where we should be going to build communities.
Homesteading and living off the grid is all well and good, but not everyone is geared that way, and you don't build a tangible culture without some urban centers.
Those should be the "strongholds" that people should be considering and where we should be coming together.
I'm not so sure many of those places still exist anymore, but we should be in the business of building them around the regional remnants of church and ethnic community establishments and attracting other red-pilled men to them along those lines.

tl;dr
1) Get out of NJ
2) Don't go too far from your family
3) Find and build communities of predominantly red-pilled men
4) share those locations on RVF!
 
Central/Western PA is a good option, as it is close and familiar to where I am now. Maine as well.

I'll see where I get job offers once I graduate, and go from there. I'm going to apply to places in many of these locations listed. I am hoping to have a spot decided on within 3-5 years and getting some land not long after that (although it will suck to get a mortgage, getting land seems like the best possible investment).

Thank you all for the feedback. I hope this benefits some other people too, as I know there must be others here with the same thought in their mind. It all feels a bit like the fall of Rome, and some places may descend into some Satanic barbarism, whereas others will hopefully go into a neo-Americana Christian nation. The Chinese saying applies here: "The empire long united, must divide."
 
Getting out of major cities is probably the best thing you can do. Better to be in the country in a bad state then the city in a good state -unless it somewhere like San Diego which had little or no impact from the riots (Republican mayor and US Naval bases + SEALs - don't think Antifa would get far there :) )

Keep in mind globalists are specifically targeting the whitest most rural areas for refugee resettlement ( adding unnecessary population to the pristine natural environment doesn't bother them when its part of their political objectives).

Anywhere they know is becoming a anti-globalist hot spot - like Idaho -they will ratchet up 'diversity'.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Lots of good advice in this thread but I'll add that for personal freedom the state you live in is far more important than the specific location. In terms of gun rights, taxes, homeschooling, etc you have a lot more freedom in a deep blue, heavily diverse major city in a red state like Atlanta, Houston, etc than you do in a rural county that voted 80% for Trump if that county is in California, NY state, etc (and there are plenty of counties like that in those states). Of course freedom isn't the only factor--safety is another one and the rural parts of even blue states are safer than cities in red states--so best case scenario is a rural area in a red state, but if you need to be near a major city for work and/or just want to be for lifestyle reasons go with one in a red or at least purple state (Philadelphia is by far the least bad of the major northeastern cities for this reason).

I like the cities on the periphery of the Appalachian region for this reason--Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Nashville--as you also have the option to save up for a bug out spot in the mountains 2-3 hours away from where you live.
 

kel

Pelican
I haven't explored much of West Virginia, but the latest Killstream interview with Peter Brimelow made me think red-pilled men should all descend on Berkeley Springs and turn it into a family-friendly resort town for red-blooded Americans:
https://www.thedailybeast.com/berke...reaks-out-after-vdare-founder-buys-its-castle
At the very least, I think vdare readers with mobile employment should be considering this (there have got to at least be a handful on this forum), and pooling their resources together there to build something great.
Berkeley Springs, interesting.

Keep in mind globalists are specifically targeting the whitest most rural areas for refugee resettlement ( adding unnecessary population to the pristine natural environment doesn't bother them when its part of their political objectives).

Anywhere they know is becoming a anti-globalist hot spot - like Idaho -they will ratchet up 'diversity'.
People in these areas need to take matters into their own hands, no other way around it. When they're building a commie block, the community needs to demolish it at night. Get as many people as you can summon since there's safety in numbers, get someone with demolition equipment if possible or just tools if not, and take it down. When they put it back up, do the same. Let them know it's just not going to happen there. If the state buys up existing buildings, same story. No, period.
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
When I googled Idaho this was the first thing to show up.... looks like a good sign to me :)

"One of the laws bans transgender people from changing the sex on their birth certificates while the other bars transgender girls and women from playing on sports teams that align with their gender identity."

Link

 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
At this point, if I end up back in the US, I think it will be in the South.

"On paper", it's not perfect, but it's where I'm from and it's possibly the only place in the US, other than Appalachia, which maintains some sense of heritage and culture outside of generic melting-pot Americana. At this point, I'm leaning towards upstate South Carolina/western North Carolina.

Personally, I've come to see the approach of pulling up a bunch of statistics and graphs to pick a place to live as fundamentally flawed, both in that it misses the true nature of a place and ignores some of the most important aspects of life, like family, religion, and culture.

Being an atomized transplant with a big family in rural Idaho is better than being an atomized bachelor in a one-bedroom apartment in Los Angeles, no doubt, but I don't know if it's the ideal. Sure, by some miracle, 100 other red-pill families might move in next door and you can create your own city-state monarchy which lives on for 20 generations, but I won't be holding my breath on that one.

From a practical perspective, you also have to consider which regions would end up together in the likely event of US balkanization, and how those regions could actually fair.
 

kel

Pelican
Need to create a community. I've talked about my farmstead plans here, bringing others out there, hopefully a few from the start and then more once I can show them the property up and working even in a rough state. I've started reaching out to others on the internet, too. I'm not brave enough to dox myself here, but at a certain point a kind of "intentional community", but more realistic, can be made with committed people you don't exactly know but who you met on the internet and seem to share values.
 
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