Good states to live in the United States

Pendleton

Pelican
You missed the point entirely. Of course it has culture. Take all the offense you want, NY is an amalgam consumerist 24-7 economic hub (used to be) with many amenities but also many issues. My focus is that many outsiders are coming in, or transients to "make it". Oh yeah, sounds just like ... you guessed it, New York. Except not as loud, rude or as bad an accent, currently.
That is what NYers mistakenly believe to be culture.
 
How is Alaska? Any thoughts?

Alaska is on thin ice, so to speak. I think it could sneakily turn into a left wing toilet by the end of the decade.

You have to understand; the voter base that keeps Alaska republican is solely all the white men in either the energy sector or the military. If either of those fold up shop and leave, its over. It reminds me a lot of what happened to New Mexico.
 
How is Alaska? Any thoughts?

It is a massive sized state with a small population density, very remote too.

The nature and the outdoors are absolutely stunning.

There's probably a lot of downsides besides just the cold weather, maybe I'm just seeing Alaska through rose colored glasses.
I can speak to Juneau, I have family in Juneau which I visit once every year. Juneau is an odd city. All the hippys that live there have guns because of the bears and all of the anti-gov conservatives get pissed if you touch their Alaska Permanent Fund payout (UBI).

Juneau itself is small enough that there aren't any chain store there except for Costco. It couldn't maintain a Walmart or Target. There's also a state prison in Juneau and no way of getting out of Juneau besides airplane or boat. There are three massive problems with Juneau, a lot of criminals get stuck there and there's a huge homeless problem. These two could be solved via policy, but Juneau is more liberal and lacks the political will to do anything. The third problem is that the sun only shines ~30 days per year. I can gray overcast days for weeks but months or years...probably not.

That being said, the fishing and hunting is the best of anywhere I have ever been. I caught 4-5 20 lb salmon per day from the channel in Juneau. It completely ruined me for fishing in my home state. My family that lives there eats meat for breakfast, lunch and dinner without ever having to buy any. They have 3 deep freezers that are always full of black-tailed deer, salmon, rockfish, hailbut, moose, and reindeer.
 
Things I hate seeing...


y'all leave your politics up there if you come down to bama...


Learn why things are good before you even consider getting involved in anything politically related down here.... that's why we got senator Doug Jones for 4 years who just signed off on anything Democrats suggested.

Stay in your lane until you are acclimated to the south

 
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Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I can speak to Juneau, I have family in Juneau which I visit once every year. Juneau is an odd city. All the hippys that live there have guns because of the bears and all of the anti-gov conservatives get pissed if you touch their Alaska Permanent Fund payout (UBI).

Juneau itself is small enough that there aren't any chain store there except for Costco. It couldn't maintain a Walmart or Target. There's also a state prison in Juneau and no way of getting out of Juneau besides airplane or boat. There are three massive problems with Juneau, a lot of criminals get stuck there and there's a huge homeless problem. These two could be solved via policy, but Juneau is more liberal and lacks the political will to do anything. The third problem is that the sun only shines ~30 days per year. I can gray overcast days for weeks but months or years...probably not.

That being said, the fishing and hunting is the best of anywhere I have ever been. I caught 4-5 20 lb salmon per day from the channel in Juneau. It completely ruined me for fishing in my home state. My family that lives there eats meat for breakfast, lunch and dinner without ever having to buy any. They have 3 deep freezers that are always full of black-tailed deer, salmon, rockfish, hailbut, moose, and reindeer.

Juneau and Ketchikan remind me more of a freer British Columbia, but they are boat/plane access only.

Anchorage is surprisingly 'urban'. I noticed a lot of Latino's that look like they took a wrong turn somewhere in East LA.

I have never been to Fairbanks but from what I hear its a pretty rugged and traditional type town. I know guys that like the Fairbanks/Delta area a lot.

I really like the coastal towns like Haines or Valdez. Skagway gives you access to tourists which is kind of nice sometimes. They are road connected which is pretty key. Most people have boats up there, but its still nice to be able to overland. I had a really nice stop in Wrangell, but again, boat access only.

It might be a nice thought to think that Alaska is some last bastion of conservative white man refuge, but I would counter that. Right next door is the Yukon, where I have a lot of close family. Its about the most left leaning liberal place in Canada. Most of that is Ottawa's intent on making sure no where in Canada experiences too much freedom, but its not like the Yukoner's fight it. My uncle was visiting last week and he said that the government of Yukon now employs about 70% of the people up there. And a good chunk of them are young upstarts from Ontario that sit in an office in Whitehorse and look at the savages with total superiority.
 
How many of you guys are seriously going to move elsewhere in 2021? I'm researching different areas and working to get a shortlist of ones to check out in the near future. I'm working remote and got the OK to stay full-time and can move states if I want to - the options are overwhelming so wanted to bounce it off of you guys too, and maybe get a dialogue going for others considering the same and need a framework.
  • Mid-30s, single
  • Want to be in or near a decent-sized metro for entertainment, socializing, dating
  • Love the outdoors (mountain biking, camping, backpacking) and jiu jitsu
  • From the west coast so I don't really like the cold...
  • Access to (independent) coffee shops
  • Libertarian/smaller government values
  • I wish I could go abroad, but that's not an option
  • Doesn't have a ridiculous real estate market since I'd like to buy some property (e.g. 3 bedroom house <$275,000).
  • Somewhat close to an international airport for trips abroad
  • Had the least intrusive COVID response
  • Shortlist currently:
    • Southern New Hampshire (e.g. Manchester). NH has the Free State Project which entices me - I've been to New England many times and am familiar with the weather.
    • Florida: Tampa, Jacksonville
    • Boise - my parents are really looking into Idaho as well, so would be nice to live close to them
    • Colorado Springs
    • Dallas/Fort Worth area
 

Cortés

Woodpecker
Gold Member
How many of you guys are seriously going to move elsewhere in 2021? I'm researching different areas and working to get a shortlist of ones to check out in the near future. I'm working remote and got the OK to stay full-time and can move states if I want to - the options are overwhelming so wanted to bounce it off of you guys too, and maybe get a dialogue going for others considering the same and need a framework.
  • Mid-30s, single
  • Want to be in or near a decent-sized metro for entertainment, socializing, dating
  • Love the outdoors (mountain biking, camping, backpacking) and jiu jitsu
  • From the west coast so I don't really like the cold...
  • Access to (independent) coffee shops
  • Libertarian/smaller government values
  • I wish I could go abroad, but that's not an option
  • Doesn't have a ridiculous real estate market since I'd like to buy some property (e.g. 3 bedroom house <$275,000).
  • Somewhat close to an international airport for trips abroad
  • Had the least intrusive COVID response
  • Shortlist currently:
    • Southern New Hampshire (e.g. Manchester). NH has the Free State Project which entices me - I've been to New England many times and am familiar with the weather.
    • Florida: Tampa, Jacksonville
    • Boise - my parents are really looking into Idaho as well, so would be nice to live close to them
    • Colorado Springs
    • Dallas/Fort Worth area
I grew up in New England and lived in New Hampshire for a bit. In these circles online people bring it up alot, but honestly I think New Hampshire being this great spot to move to is kind of a meme. The gun laws are great, and it does hit most of the stuff on your list, but the people in NH suck. Very cold and boring people, and you are surrounded by smug people with the New England liberal physiognomy. If you're somewhat of a hermit it would be a good spot. Southern NH in particular is ugly and boring as hell. You're never too far from the mountains, but anywhere south of Manchester (dump of a city btw) is soulless commercial sprawl. You might think that you could tolerate a New Hampshire winter, but I warn you it gets very old, very quick. Right now in MA it's 30° and snowing like crazy, in NH wind-chill is probably 0° and likely to get at least a foot in a half of snow. Its like this non stop for 5 months a year, every year. I might just be projecting my desires, the grass is always greener.

Northern NH, VT, NY and ME have some very nice small towns, and you could probably find a small french-canadian catholic enclave (I personally haven't been there enough to research that). I will say though that NH is supposed to have many startups coming in for the cheap COL, low taxes and so on.
 

sanfranman

Chicken
It's hard to image that California in recent memory was a Republican State. If you look at the county maps after the recent election most of it is red. Interestingly in the recent elections, the GOP vote increased in many places in the State, and many of the new immigrant communities are socially conservative (especially on abortion) and more likely to be GOP voters in the future.
 
How many of you guys are seriously going to move elsewhere in 2021? I'm researching different areas and working to get a shortlist of ones to check out in the near future. I'm working remote and got the OK to stay full-time and can move states if I want to - the options are overwhelming so wanted to bounce it off of you guys too, and maybe get a dialogue going for others considering the same and need a framework.
  • Mid-30s, single
  • Want to be in or near a decent-sized metro for entertainment, socializing, dating
  • Love the outdoors (mountain biking, camping, backpacking) and jiu jitsu
  • From the west coast so I don't really like the cold...
  • Access to (independent) coffee shops
  • Libertarian/smaller government values
  • I wish I could go abroad, but that's not an option
  • Doesn't have a ridiculous real estate market since I'd like to buy some property (e.g. 3 bedroom house <$275,000).
  • Somewhat close to an international airport for trips abroad
  • Had the least intrusive COVID response
  • Shortlist currently:
    • Southern New Hampshire (e.g. Manchester). NH has the Free State Project which entices me - I've been to New England many times and am familiar with the weather.
    • Florida: Tampa, Jacksonville
    • Boise - my parents are really looking into Idaho as well, so would be nice to live close to them
    • Colorado Springs
    • Dallas/Fort Worth area
I'd probably cross NH off the list due to the cold. The other places that you listed are places I'm thinking about too. Also somewhere in AZ perhaps but it's hard to decide.
 

aeroektar

Pelican
I grew up in New England and lived in New Hampshire for a bit. In these circles online people bring it up alot, but honestly I think New Hampshire being this great spot to move to is kind of a meme. The gun laws are great, and it does hit most of the stuff on your list, but the people in NH suck. Very cold and boring people, and you are surrounded by smug people with the New England liberal physiognomy. If you're somewhat of a hermit it would be a good spot. Southern NH in particular is ugly and boring as hell. You're never too far from the mountains, but anywhere south of Manchester (dump of a city btw) is soulless commercial sprawl. You might think that you could tolerate a New Hampshire winter, but I warn you it gets very old, very quick. Right now in MA it's 30° and snowing like crazy, in NH wind-chill is probably 0° and likely to get at least a foot in a half of snow. Its like this non stop for 5 months a year, every year. I might just be projecting my desires, the grass is always greener.

Northern NH, VT, NY and ME have some very nice small towns, and you could probably find a small french-canadian catholic enclave (I personally haven't been there enough to research that). I will say though that NH is supposed to have many startups coming in for the cheap COL, low taxes and so on.
I live in NH and I'm originally from MA. I really only moved here for the laws/small government. Government really does a good job of staying out of your life in NH whereas in MA government is up your ass constantly. You can pretty much do whatever you want here and the cops are great, there's generally a lot of trust between the people of NH and the cops, whereas in MA the cops harass people and ruin lives for fun.

The nature is also great in NH, it's a great place if you like spending time outdoors and you can pursue any sort of outdoor activity you can think of.

Besides the good laws and outdoors, there isn't much else that I enjoy about the state. The women are on average gross. For anyone who's spent significant time in Massachusetts you will be familiar with the typical trashy loud obnoxious masshole white girls, the women in NH are the same, but they are rougher around the edges and generally lack femininity. And because NH is very white and off the map, you don't have much to choose from if you want to date asians, latinas or transplants from less toxic cultures.

Other then that, the men are mostly a bunch of typical New England assholes, the people are about the least religious in the country, the population is old. Outside of the outdoor activities, it's boring. The winters are cold, snowy and long.

It's not all bad if you like the outdoors and can find a good girl to settle down with, but I wouldn't call it a great spot for single men to move to. I'm thinking about heading South when my lease here is up.
 

phluff127

Sparrow
Scottsdale and specifically north Scottsdale is my favorite place to live in the USA and I’ve traveled and lived all over. Great social scene and outdoor beauty in Scottsdale and an hour north is Sedona, two hours flagstaff and four hours the Grand Canyon with Vegas five hours away. Perfect weather. And because of the cowboy history it is way less pozd than other places. Because there is so much land it won’t be for a long while that real estate prices appreciate greatly and cost of living in general is low for a city. Only downside is you have to drive everywhere but if you are looking to settle down and live a normal life I can’t think of a better place to do it than Scottsdale. If you want a little more rural check out cave creek. If you want a cheap suburban option check out Chandler
 
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Douglas Quaid

Kingfisher
I was recently in Boise and Colorado Springs and liked them both.

Boise is one of my favorite cities I've been to. Very clean, the downtown is great, the outdoor options are great (you can even walk from downtown to some nice trails in the foothills), there's skiing and mountain biking close by, lots of younger people, easy to walk around, the cost of living is rising but still reasonable, the truly amazing parts of Idaho's outdoors are within a few hours drive, the area as a whole is Republican, Idaho as a whole is very Republican, etc.

Some negatives would be lower wages, the amount of people moving in (some noticeable leftists, especially from California), the North End was pretty pozzed, etc. Overall I think the positives outweigh the negatives.

Colorado Springs was nice as well. The mountains are right there, and this is one of the best outdoor cities in the US. Some truly amazing scenery and hiking that are close by, there were lots of mountain bikers, good skiing within a couple of hours, I liked downtown but it wasn't as nice as Boise's, the cost of living is reasonable (probably lower than Boise's), the area is pretty Republican.

Negatives would be the noticeable homeless population (still nothing like Denver or Seattle), and living in a state that is being ruined by leftists and transplants.

Another option is Coeur d'Alene in North Idaho, which is close to Spokane. The area is a similar size to Boise and Colorado Springs. The scenery is amazing with mountains, lakes, forests and vast wilderness close by. This is also a very Republican area.
 
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Douglas Quaid

Kingfisher
I also have some time spent in Florida. I think Florida is a good state if you're in the right spot. No income tax, and usually good politics.

The Panhandle is very Republican, with amazing beaches and clear water. The cost of living is lower, and Pensacola is close by. Mobile and Tallahassee are relatively close as well depending on where you are. I could be happy there doing a lot of golfing and boating/fishing. I also like that winters are cooler up there, to get some more variety. Baldwin County, Alabama is basically an extension of the Panhandle as well.

I like the Gulf side of Florida in general. Great beaches, more laid back people, generally more Republican. Sarasota/Bradenton are nice and close to Tampa Bay. There are a lot of choices on the Gulf all the way down to Naples.

On the Atlantic side I really like the Stuart area. This is north of Miami/Fort Lauderdale/West Palm Beach, but with a lot less people and more room to breathe. It was pretty laid back.

The main negative of Florida is the lack of seasons and heat/humidity in summer. This is easier to deal with if you're close to the water.
 
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nathan

Robin
How many of you guys are seriously going to move elsewhere in 2021? I'm researching different areas and working to get a shortlist of ones to check out in the near future. I'm working remote and got the OK to stay full-time and can move states if I want to - the options are overwhelming so wanted to bounce it off of you guys too, and maybe get a dialogue going for others considering the same and need a framework.
  • Mid-30s, single
  • Want to be in or near a decent-sized metro for entertainment, socializing, dating
  • Love the outdoors (mountain biking, camping, backpacking) and jiu jitsu
  • From the west coast so I don't really like the cold...
  • Access to (independent) coffee shops
  • Libertarian/smaller government values
  • I wish I could go abroad, but that's not an option
  • Doesn't have a ridiculous real estate market since I'd like to buy some property (e.g. 3 bedroom house <$275,000).
  • Somewhat close to an international airport for trips abroad
  • Had the least intrusive COVID response
  • Shortlist currently:
    • Southern New Hampshire (e.g. Manchester). NH has the Free State Project which entices me - I've been to New England many times and am familiar with the weather.
    • Florida: Tampa, Jacksonville
    • Boise - my parents are really looking into Idaho as well, so would be nice to live close to them
    • Colorado Springs
    • Dallas/Fort Worth area

I would not have recommended Texas prior to the 2020 elections as it appeared we were drifting a lot further blue, but the Democrats managed to register 1.8 million new voters since 2016 here and they still got BTFO. And a lot of the people here who voted blue are not liberal by any means, they just hate Trump's demeanor.

Texas suburbs may fit your list pretty well. You won't get libertarian values in any city, but many of the suburbs are very right-leaning (relatively). If you want an actual city, Ft. Worth and Houston are about as right wing as any city can possibly be. People forget about Fort Worth because it is overshadowed by Dallas, but it is still almost a top 10 American city, by size. Houston is Democrat, but way less Democrat than Dallas or Austin. I would not recommend Houston because it is a shithole, but north of Houston there are some very nice communities like the Woodlands and Conroe. Dallas' northern suburbs are booming and have boomed for a while, but the southern suburbs are probably about to get an influx of white flight in the next decade when people discover them. You may find the real estate prices around certain cities to be a bit more expensive than your desired range, but it's largely specific to whatever suburb you look at. DFW has about as international of an airport as you can get. All of the cities supported covid lockdowns (although I am not sure about Ft. Worth's response).

And then there's Austin. Austin is definitely the nicest Texas metro and is where all of the SF and NYC people are moving. Real estate is absolutely booming there. It is the most liberal, and its northern suburbs are abnormally liberal too (for Texas). It's also the smallest metro of any of the main Texas metros (DFW, Houston, San Antonio, Austin) and supposedly has a major traffic problem but I have always found Houston and DFW to be worse. Austin definitely has a ton of indy coffee shops.

If you watched Roosh's Babylon Road series, you can see some basics of the Texas metros too, but from what I remember, he rated San Antonio way higher than I would have, and he apparently had a worse experience in Austin than I ever have had, despite living there for a while recently. None of the metros are naturally beautiful with the possible exception of Austin's Westlake Hills area, but even that isn't as nice as many other American locations. Houston is straight up ugly and Dallas has nothing.

For dating, I do not know if you are Christian or not, but Texas actually does have dateable Christian girls unlike many other cities apparently. Austin is the most heathen place in Texas but it is still probably better than any west coast city. My metro ranking would probably go: Austin, DFW, Houston, San Antonio
 

nathan

Robin
Any clues on the Texas border cities? All I've got to go is the realtor.com prices...even my inner jew can't find fault with those prices!

Not too familiar with RGV (which is what they call it). Pretty Mexican but apparently fairly right wing as far as Mexican border towns go. RGV is basically an entirely different state than the DFW-Houston-San Antonio triangle, which contains the vast majority of the Texas population. I would consider RGV to be basically Mexico minus the lawlessness (because it is still America after all). I assume real estate is good there too. I know in early 2019 a real estate investor friend was privy to some plans from a fairly large home builder to open operations there.

Maybe someone who lives there can chime in.
 
Scottsdale and specifically north Scottsdale is my favorite place to live in the USA and I’ve traveled and lived all over. Great social scene and outdoor beauty in Scottsdale and an hour north is Sedona, two hours flagstaff and four hours the Grand Canyon with Vegas five hours away. Perfect weather. And because of the cowboy history it is way less pozd than other places.
I have a friend in Scottsdale actually, and he enjoys it. My main concerns are the water availability over the coming decades and the 110+ degree summers.

I was recently in Boise and Colorado Springs and liked them both.

Boise is one of my favorite cities I've been to. Very clean, the downtown is great, the outdoor options are great (you can even walk from downtown to some nice trails in the foothills), there's skiing and mountain biking close by, lots of younger people, easy to walk around, the cost of living is rising but still reasonable, the truly amazing parts of Idaho's outdoors are within a few hours drive, the area as a whole is Republican, Idaho as a whole is very Republican, etc.

Some negatives would be lower wages, the amount of people moving in (some noticeable leftists, especially from California), the North End was pretty pozzed, etc. Overall I think the positives outweigh the negatives.

Colorado Springs was nice as well. The mountains are right there, and this is one of the best outdoor cities in the US. Some truly amazing scenery and hiking that are close by, there were lots of mountain bikers, good skiing within a couple of hours, I liked downtown but it wasn't as nice as Boise's, the cost of living is reasonable (probably lower than Boise's), the area is pretty Republican.

Negatives would be the noticeable homeless population (still nothing like Denver or Seattle), and living in a state that is being ruined by leftists and transplants.

Another option is Coeur d'Alene in North Idaho, which is close to Spokane. The area is a similar size to Boise and Colorado Springs. The scenery is amazing with mountains, lakes, forests and vast wilderness close by. This is also a very Republican area.
Boise has quickly become a top option for all of these reasons, but I still need to visit to see how it vibes with me. I've heard the North End is where the progressives go as well. I know about CdA too but the real estate has blown up in recent years plus I worry it's a bit small for my liking.


I'm still somewhat considering either Knoxville or Chattanooga TN as well - anyone have input on those areas?
 

Monty_Brogan

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Scottsdale and specifically north Scottsdale is my favorite place to live in the USA and I’ve traveled and lived all over. Great social scene and outdoor beauty in Scottsdale and an hour north is Sedona, two hours flagstaff and four hours the Grand Canyon with Vegas five hours away. Perfect weather. And because of the cowboy history it is way less pozd than other places. Because there is so much land it won’t be for a long while that real estate prices appreciate greatly and cost of living in general is low for a city. Only downside is you have to drive everywhere but if you are looking to settle down and live a normal life I can’t think of a better place to do it than Scottsdale. If you want a little more rural check out cave creek. If you want a cheap suburban option check out Chandler

I'm a happily married man. BUT this area has the greatest concentration of drop-dead gorgeous women I've ever seen. I think it's the weather the keeps everyone in shape and the influx of Californians.

I grew up going to AZ as my grandparents had a winter home in Sun City West. I agree with the cowboy history and always liked visiting the state.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
How many of you guys are seriously going to move elsewhere in 2021? I'm researching different areas and working to get a shortlist of ones to check out in the near future. I'm working remote and got the OK to stay full-time and can move states if I want to - the options are overwhelming so wanted to bounce it off of you guys too, and maybe get a dialogue going for others considering the same and need a framework.
  • Mid-30s, single
  • Want to be in or near a decent-sized metro for entertainment, socializing, dating
  • Love the outdoors (mountain biking, camping, backpacking) and jiu jitsu
  • From the west coast so I don't really like the cold...
  • Access to (independent) coffee shops
  • Libertarian/smaller government values
  • I wish I could go abroad, but that's not an option
  • Doesn't have a ridiculous real estate market since I'd like to buy some property (e.g. 3 bedroom house <$275,000).
  • Somewhat close to an international airport for trips abroad
  • Had the least intrusive COVID response
  • Shortlist currently:
    • Southern New Hampshire (e.g. Manchester). NH has the Free State Project which entices me - I've been to New England many times and am familiar with the weather.
    • Florida: Tampa, Jacksonville
    • Boise - my parents are really looking into Idaho as well, so would be nice to live close to them
    • Colorado Springs
    • Dallas/Fort Worth area

Anywhere an hour outside of Las Vegas might fit. There's lots of outdoors stuff to do outside of Vegas and there's a large MMA community there. Also no state income tax.
 
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