Good states to live in the United States

The 'where to move?' is one of the most fundamental issues we can grapple with today, or ever. And when I say 'we' I mean normal people (you know who you are.) I've been dealing with this issue for decades, first encountering it when I got weary of American culture that was shifting heavily under bad angles, and society in which 'goalposts' (whatever they were at the moment) were being constantly moved yet again.... so much so that even a wide-eyed immigrant me could not recognize the 'old America' of 10-years-ago, let alone else. I understood the concept of 'progress' and 'moving on', but these were turbo-charged, tectonic, contrived shifts, as if guided by an 'invisible hand' with a time-sensitive agenda. Having been disillusioned with big cities' Sodom and Gomorrah charm, the quest for return to 'original America' for me became a search for a small, quaint town that retained its traditional way of life, the 'last Mayberry' if you will. Little did I know that I was embarking on a mission that could never be fulfilled, because even if I were able to have found it (and I never did) - it still would've been a community in the midst of its own nostalgia for its own yesteryear, something depicted so well in The Last Picture Show (1971).

Ultimately, I realized that searching for 'old times' was another way for searching for 'young me' - neither which was longer there.

You wouldn't believe how this country's changed...

 
Just to add more specifically, the 'old-times' small-town America was probably first 'destroyed' for good back in 1963. The optimistic outlook and good-hearted 'innocence' was gone, and the Age of Aquarius was descending. This was then physically confirmed with the rise of economic globalization, first notably in the 1980s and especially since the 1990s. When factories closed and jobs disappeared and supporting economies folded, what was left in their wake was a temporal and habitual vacuum to be filled. Young and restless departed for Sodom and Gomorrah, while those who stayed behind needed something to do with their time. Enter hard drugs. There was a deliberate and highly-organized effort to blanket small-town America with pure manufactured evil, in the same way large cities were overrun with it since the late 60s and early 70s. Broken windows on abandoned factories led to broken teeth (ravaged by drugs) on people's faces led to broken families and homes. Domino effect. Than the transients moved in. In absence of once-dependable anchored lives small town people started moving around and checking out other small towns...

Let's watch the sun come up in another town
Try our luck a little further down

Tom Waits

only to find the very same thing they wanted to leave.

Because there is no 'there' there.

That is not to say that everything happened overnight and that everyone was affected at once and in the same way. There were some regional and local differences, and perhaps some places held better than others. Tiny slivers of some 'old times' ways may even be present in some places today (especially when contrasted with the contemporary hyper-real) - but in general sense it's been major down slope for quite a long a time. Provincial America irrevocably changed for worse, sooner or later. And even if some places held out for a while ('old habits die hard') the 'winds of change' have eventually gotten the better of them too. The macro picture always trumps the micro one.

In closing, to seek what may be a 'good state' today is a subjective task that entails writing down the list of your own personally-desired parameters, and cross-checking them with the reality on the ground. If I were to search again, I would start with the list of states that have recent laws on books that prohibit the micro-chipping of humans (and not just for employment purposes.) The list of those states is somewhat surprising as it is small.
 
Here are my current top four places in no particular order. I will be moving sooner than later as the political situation evolves here in the USA.

Boise, Idaho
Florida (somewhere with a red local government)
Texas (somewhere with a red local government)
Somewhere in Oklahoma (heard really good things).

That's pretty much it, but I am sure that there are other good options in the South (South should rise again economically speaking). Key factors for me are state/local politics and taxation, business opportunity and weather. Beach life can be a game changer for stress I hear, but I'm concerned I may not be motivated to work as hard. Overall I think it is a solid strategy to live where you fit in most with the culture. This is not only better for you, but time tested defense against big brother. Heck, if the Amish have made it this long, it must work pretty well.
 
I am trying to decide where to move to and weighing criteria:

a. strong 2nd amendment protection - we know Biden is coming for guns.
b. local or independent economy - granted none are truly independent but the more small local farms for example, the better.
c. low population to land ratio.
d. some 'culture' or arts access. I know this 'blues' things a bit, but we need reminders of Civilization and high arts.It could just be seasonal. Many urban symphonies for example, have summer retreats.
e. demographics. Let's just say at "unvibrant" as possible :) low crime rate, high trust culture.
f. Good ecology/open land.
g. Mountains - traditionally when a people are under siege this is were the people survive. Afghanistan, Spain when it was invaded by Muslims, and well, the US in a decade or so, very possibly
h. good water supply - water shortage /quality is going to be a big issue in the future.
i. Christian population - as 'orthodox' as possible - Mormons are not Christian, and Christian Zionists are heretics. Honestly I don't have a fetish about Protestant, Catholic or Orthodox - I believe you can find good in all of them - and hersey in all - granted mainline protestants are pretty much a dumpster fire but there are some trad Lutherans and Anglicans out there.
j. Cooler climate. I do think things are literally getting hotter whatever the cause

Thoughts?
 
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palsofchaos

Sparrow
I am trying to decide where to move to and weighing criteria:

a. strong 2nd amendment protection - we know Biden is coming for guns.
b. local or independent economy - granted none are truly independent but the more small local farms for example, the better.
c. low population to land ratio.
d. some 'culture' or arts access. I know this 'blues' things a bit, but we need reminders of Civilization and high arts.It could just be seasonal. Many urban symphonies for example, have summer retreats.
e. demographics. Let's just say at "unvibrant" as possible :) low crime rate, high trust culture.
f. Good ecology/open land.
g. Mountains - traditionally when a people are under siege this is were the people survive. Afghanistan, Spain when it was invaded by Muslims, and well, the US in a decade or so, very possibly
h. good water supply - water shortage /quality is going to be a big issue in the future.
i. Christian population - as 'orthodox' as possible - Mormons are not Christian, and Christian Zionists are heretics. Honestly I don't have a fetish about Protestant, Catholic or Orthodox - I believe you can find good in all of them - and hersey in all - granted mainline protestants are pretty much a dumpster fire but there are some trad Lutherans and Anglicans out there.
j. Cooler climate. I do think things are literally getting hotter whatever the cause

Thoughts?

South Dakota

a. Open carry is legal
b. We have our own ISPs, Plenty of banks, Healthcare, Agriculture, and GIS are big here... as of this year weed to I guess...
c. Yup
d. Downtown SIoux Falls has plenty of art and culture. We have a beautiful Cathedral. Our state is also big on statues and monuments if you can imagine that.
e. Lowest amount of ((you know what's)) per capita than any other state.
f. Yup
g. West side of the state has the mountains. East side is flat.
h. Water could be better but there's plenty underground.
i. Very Christian about half catholic and half non-catholic. Have a few orthodox parishes (in Sioux Falls). Immigrants are christian (latino and African)
j. It snows here. I ski all the time.
 
@wayfaringstranger

Having lived in Utah (job corps program) I would not dismiss Mormons out of hand. They may not be Christian but being Christian does not automatically make one a good person. They generally do not cause you any problems and I've never been discriminated against as a non-mormon. Furthermore you may think them cucks but I wouldn't be so sure about that...as a means of survival they have developed an exceptional talent for reading the political winds...

And when those winds blow towards our inevitable Balkanization (I would bet on Texas being the first to pull the succession trigger) they may come out of it in the best shape of the lot.
 
I would not dismiss Mormons out of han
They may not be Christian but being Christian does not automatically make one a good person
Individually they are honest, nice, but as a group I believe they are inherently subversive and hostile towards the histroric American nation. They were literally outcasts and still resent it.

I've never been discriminated against as a non-mormon.
Perhaps, that you know of, but you certainly haven't been favored.

And when those winds blow towards our inevitable Balkanization (I would bet on Texas being the first to pull the succession trigger) they may come out of it in the best shape of the lot.
Yes, as a Mormon nation, don't want to live there :)
 

John

Pigeon
Is there a list somewhere of towns/cities that have rejected mask mandates in the states that don't have a state-wide requirement? Rejecting or mandating masks is a good litmus test for choosing a place to live.
 
I haven't gone through the entire thread yet but I'm looking to move soon and I got three states in mind:

1. Virginia
2. North Carolina
3. South Carolina (Charleston Area Most Likely)

Thoughts?
 

Jünger

Ostrich
https://thefederalist.com/2021/01/1...like-mine-and-local-republicans-are-clueless/
As a resident of a small town in east Tennessee, I regret to report that wokeness is everywhere, even in the brightest-red areas of Republican-majority states. My town is home to a small, 200-year-old, Presbyterian-affiliated liberal arts college that appears to be an island of sanity in higher education. But it’s not, and neither is the rest of the town.

When we relocated here from Austin, my wife and I imagined the school was comparable to Hillsdale College, except nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. My wife and I quickly learned the reality is otherwise when a supposedly faith-based lecture we attended on campus was devoted to the teachings of Karl Marx rather than Jesus Christ.
 

kel

Ostrich
I haven't gone through the entire thread yet but I'm looking to move soon and I got three states in mind:

1. Virginia
2. North Carolina
3. South Carolina (Charleston Area Most Likely)

Thoughts?
I have multiple family members (and their families) living in Virginia. They all moved there from where I live in a very progressive/globalist state, and the idea for them was looking for lower taxes, lower cost of living in general, and to be able to have a more classic, family-oriented, working class suburban dream type situation like they had (at least an illusion of) when we were all kids.

They describe just about everywhere in Virginia as essentially a beltway suburb, now. Even if a whole city/neighborhood/whatever is full of regular people, the local laws are nonetheless DC-style woke bureaucracy nightmare and the culture suffers as a result.

Keep in mind, too, that these are fundamentally liberal people talking. It'd be one thing for a LITERAL NAZI like me to worry about DC/cosmo bullshit spreading like a virus, but these are regular schlubs who are broadly progressive and, like I said, would kinda just like to have the illusion of the 90s back and be left alone, hardly extreme reactionaries or anything. They're concerned and exhausted by this.

For what it's worth....
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
I have multiple family members (and their families) living in Virginia. They all moved there from where I live in a very progressive/globalist state, and the idea for them was looking for lower taxes, lower cost of living in general, and to be able to have a more classic, family-oriented, working class suburban dream type situation like they had (at least an illusion of) when we were all kids.

They describe just about everywhere in Virginia as essentially a beltway suburb, now. Even if a whole city/neighborhood/whatever is full of regular people, the local laws are nonetheless DC-style woke bureaucracy nightmare and the culture suffers as a result.

Keep in mind, too, that these are fundamentally liberal people talking. It'd be one thing for a LITERAL NAZI like me to worry about DC/cosmo bullshit spreading like a virus, but these are regular schlubs who are broadly progressive and, like I said, would kinda just like to have the illusion of the 90s back and be left alone, hardly extreme reactionaries or anything. They're concerned and exhausted by this.

For what it's worth....
This is the crux of what most Americans are looking for, and is increasingly difficult to find. The marketed dream of 50s America is enticing, yet ever more elusory. It's clear that in this post-modernist phase, where every Joe Shmoe and his kid has smartphone, it's impossible to revert to the stage where society was high-trust, low-tech, and all-around pleasant. Demographical changes and technological "advances" have destroyed this model of living, and it's clear that there is no going back. It will be difficult if not impossible for most Americans to accept their reality, for it is not what was marketed to them.
 
Is there a list somewhere of towns/cities that have rejected mask mandates in the states that don't have a state-wide requirement? Rejecting or mandating masks is a good litmus test for choosing a place to live.

I've mentioned it in other threads but most of the major Florida metros have mask mandates. These include Miami, the Keys, Sarasota, Greater Tampa Bay, Orlando, Jacksonville, and Tallahassee. Mask compliance in more rural areas is between 50% and 90% as of mid-January, 2021. Although churches are exempt, many are at high compliance rates in those metros, but you can find some with less if you look.
 

Patriarch

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I really love what you all are saying about Idaho/Wyoming. My wife and I are living overseas right now but we'll be moving back to the US in a couple years. I'm originally from the Mid-Atlantic and I'm not sure we'll be moving back to my home state for a variety of political, demographic and regulatory issues.

Can anyone comment more on the actual culture of places like Idaho and Wyoming? Being from the East Coast I think we could easily adjust to anywhere from Florida to Maine without much issue, but other places on my shortlist like Texas or Idaho might be a bit of a culture shock. At the same time, I've been living abroad for 6 years so maybe it wouldn't be that big of a deal. We're currently looking at New Hampshire and West Virginia in addition to the other states mentioned.

Issues that are important to us that are probably the same as most others here:

  1. Strong 2A protection
  2. Low overall tax burden
  3. Low crime
  4. Ability to grow some crops, both inside and outside a greenhouse
  5. Favorable demographics--doesn't have to be 99% white but there shouldn't be racial tension
  6. Access to nature. Hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, etc.
  7. Access to a major airport. My wife's family lives in Asia and I'd like to be able to fly back here without transferring half a dozen times. For example, I saw that Cheyenne, Wyoming is less than 2 hours away from Denver, which flies directly to Japan. 3 hours away from a major airport would be fine.
  8. This is important for both of us but probably starting to get into "wishful thinking." We both eat a lot of Asian food, and being able to go to an Asian grocery store with fresh produce (not just a corner store with dry and canned food) once per week would be ideal. Again, driving 2-3 hours for an occasional grocery trip is no problem. Living on the East Coast I'm surrounded by huge, fully stocked Korean grocery store chains, but I doubt there's a big market for durian and kimchi in Boise.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
You may have seen what I have written on this thread already, but some of your criteria are the same as mine.

1. Anything in the PNW and Rockies are pretty good for 2A. Of course I am assuming you want something rural or small town.
2. Tax wise WY and WA are good, with OR and MT having no sales tax. I find OR to be a pretty cheap place overall compared to other regions.
3. There is pretty much no crime in the small towns of the PNW and Rockies. It can change though depending on the town, of course. High native pop or seasonal workers can skew this trend to be pretty high. But you would likely avoid these towns anyway.
4. For growing, you can't beat WA and OR.
5. Outside of cities, the PNW region is probably 95% white. Natives and a growing Latino pop in some places can make up a decent percentage.
6. You live in nature here. Its all around you, pretty much wherever you go.
7. My wife is Japanese and her family is mostly in Japan so when we explore for land, she is looking for things like food and flights. Food is going to be tough for us as we really like the north eastern Washington and north west Idaho areas. Coeur d'Alene has some great spots and some Asian groceries, and is much more livable than Spokane. North of there is Sandpoint which is pretty touristy and is comfortable for Asians. I have been watching Priest Lake area go nearly 100% California in the past years with homes in the $10m range now. Its mind blowing, but there is something to be said about living where the super rich are pouring into. They think Priest Lake is a big secret, and to some extent it is, but only to their liberal friends down south. I really like the Pend Orielle region for good land.

 
It is becoming more and more clear if you are a guy who is traditional and wants to get away from the rot and decay you have to move out to bum fuck nowhere, excuse my language, all cities and highly developed areas around the globe appear to be fallen. There is no in between anymore. There is nowhere you can run to. We are officially left with moving out to nowhere and turning nowhere into somewhere. There is no alternative. It is either pack up and head out to one of these random ass states, rural villages and completely alien countries or endure the globo homo trials that are becoming increasingly evil and testing, the next few generations are now tasked with building anew....

If your intentions are to be around a White European Population that has their head screwed on straight and a culture that is not completely amidst the ruins I am sorry to break the news for you but that place no longer exists in this world.
 

bmw633

Woodpecker
I haven't gone through the entire thread yet but I'm looking to move soon and I got three states in mind:

1. Virginia
2. North Carolina
3. South Carolina (Charleston Area Most Likely)

Thoughts?
Definitely not Virginia. Governor and both houses of the legislature have flipped Socialist. Removed all of the statues, give ANTIFA things a pass, but ban protests by Trumpers.

South Florida, outside the big cities over on the west coast near Lake Okeechobee is cool.
 

Patriarch

Kingfisher
Gold Member
You may have seen what I have written on this thread already, but some of your criteria are the same as mine.

1. Anything in the PNW and Rockies are pretty good for 2A. Of course I am assuming you want something rural or small town.
2. Tax wise WY and WA are good, with OR and MT having no sales tax. I find OR to be a pretty cheap place overall compared to other regions.
3. There is pretty much no crime in the small towns of the PNW and Rockies. It can change though depending on the town, of course. High native pop or seasonal workers can skew this trend to be pretty high. But you would likely avoid these towns anyway.
4. For growing, you can't beat WA and OR.
5. Outside of cities, the PNW region is probably 95% white. Natives and a growing Latino pop in some places can make up a decent percentage.
6. You live in nature here. Its all around you, pretty much wherever you go.
7. My wife is Japanese and her family is mostly in Japan so when we explore for land, she is looking for things like food and flights. Food is going to be tough for us as we really like the north eastern Washington and north west Idaho areas. Coeur d'Alene has some great spots and some Asian groceries, and is much more livable than Spokane. North of there is Sandpoint which is pretty touristy and is comfortable for Asians. I have been watching Priest Lake area go nearly 100% California in the past years with homes in the $10m range now. Its mind blowing, but there is something to be said about living where the super rich are pouring into. They think Priest Lake is a big secret, and to some extent it is, but only to their liberal friends down south. I really like the Pend Orielle region for good land.

Yes I really appreciated your input in this thread. My wife is Vietnamese and it sounds like we are both looking at very similar places here.
 
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