Good states to live in the United States

aynrus

Pelican
One state to definitely stay out of, Mainers still can't come back to the state after a trip out without mandatory test or vaxx:

Why is this still allowed? Any emergency powers must have been expired by now, there's no indefinite extensions for these. This is some kind of slavery...
 
I think Wyoming is the safest place to move in the US, and if I were ever to pick up and completely change regions, it would be right outside Cheyenne and the Colorado border (so within range of modern civilization) but safely on the Wyoming side. I don't think there's any chance liberalism ever gets to Wyoming; it's the Siberia of our future USSR, albeit far more hospitable.

I moved to Western Michigan from Chicagoland area, and I highly recommend it. Strong Christian subculture, a good sense of state pride, people generally raise their families in a wholesome way, reasonably affordable cost of living, and the Coof narrative is not popular at all in Michigan outside of the Detroit, Lansing, and Grand Rapids areas. Michigan still has a relatively love vax-rate despite the Governor Whitmer being one of the loudest governors in the nation on pro-vax propaganda. Strong resistance here of the "silent majority". Michigan, other than Detroit area, will never be liberal majority.

In addition to the amazing wholesome people and families of Michigan, I personally think it has the best outdoors scene in the entire midwest. Tons of lake, public land set aside for forests, and nice beaches for the Great Lakes region. Great hunting. Obviously the UP is basically like Canada, and no Lower-48 madness would ever permeate the UP as a bug-out location. The only thing marginally negative about Michigan is the liberal taxes from Detroit, but it's a small price to pay for living in the best state in the Midwest.

I should also mention, Grand Rapids is one of the nicest, most modern small cities (~200K people) in the entire US and definitely worth visiting.
 

aynrus

Pelican
I've been to Michigan UP...it's very conservative and seriously doubt liberal agenda would take hold there. Gorgeous nature. But to me places South of it win solely on the grounds of mosquitos that will eat you alive in MI.
I could hardly enjoy my outdoors time in Upper Penninsula because of the mosquitos. In spring, there're tons of biting gnats/Black Flies also. I'm not sure how is it in the Lower Penninsula, but the locals told me still many bugs.
I researched Michigan before traveling to camp there and everyone conveniently forgot to mention horrendous mosquito clouds out in nature.
When you go South mosquitos disappear, but there're a lot more ticks I think.
Wyoming has very moderate mosquitos, no black fly issues that I know of, and no real tick problems.
 
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I've been to Michigan UP...it's very conservative and seriously doubt liberal agenda would take hold there. Gorgeous nature. But to me places South of it win solely on the grounds of mosquitos that will eat you alive in MI.
I could hardly enjoy my outdoors time in Upper Penninsula because of the mosquitos. In spring, there're tons of biting gnats/Black Flies also. I'm not sure how is it in the Lower Penninsula, but the locals told me still many bugs.
I researched Michigan before traveling to camp there and everyone conveniently forgot to mention horrendous mosquito clouds out in nature.
When you go South mosquitos disappear, but there're a lot more ticks I think.
Wyoming has very moderate mosquitos, no black fly issues that I know of, and no real tick problems.

It is utterly insane how much of a problem the UP mosquitos are, you are right on the mark there. Best to get things done before nightfall and then head inside well screened in areas. Still love it though; keeps the riff-raff out.

I'd love to do Wyoming, but as another person said, it's just a bit too far from friends + fam
 

aynrus

Pelican
It is utterly insane how much of a problem the UP mosquitos are, you are right on the mark there. Best to get things done before nightfall and then head inside well screened in areas. Still love it though; keeps the riff-raff out.

I'd love to do Wyoming, but as another person said, it's just a bit too far from friends + fam
When I was there (late July that year) they were eating you alive mid-day too...and they'd get inside the screenhouse as you have to get in and out, there're so many of them they just swarm in at any door opening. I was eaten up at night sleeping inside the screenhouse as I don't use chemical repellents, I always had long pants on but my legs were just one big scar because they still get in between socks and pants.

Wyoming is going to be a lot more expensive than Michigan, especially if one wants to buy some land with the house. And drilling a well in WY is going to be an expensive gamble if there's no well already.
 
When I was there (late July that year) they were eating you alive mid-day too...and they'd get inside the screenhouse as you have to get in and out, there're so many of them they just swarm in at any door opening. I was eaten up at night sleeping inside the screenhouse as I don't use chemical repellents, I always had long pants on but my legs were just one big scar because they still get in between socks and pants.

Wyoming is going to be a lot more expensive than Michigan, especially if one wants to buy some land with the house. And drilling a well in WY is going to be an expensive gamble if there's no well already.
Even if you wear mosquito masks they will penetrate the netting and laugh right in your face, they are relentless and one of God's great creatures. The only effective deterrent I know of is a big camp fire, they don't take kindly to the smoke.

Useless Fact of the Day: From Detroit to the west tip of the UP, is farther than from Detroit to Washington DC
 

aynrus

Pelican
Even if you wear mosquito masks they will penetrate the netting and laugh right in your face, they are relentless and one of God's great creatures. The only effective deterrent I know of is a big camp fire, they don't take kindly to the smoke.

Useless Fact of the Day: From Detroit to the west tip of the UP, is farther than from Detroit to Washington DC
Yes, and I had not just a headnet but entire upper body mesh suit on, with rubber bands at hips and wrists, just to be able to, say, make lunch, but they were still getting in and at daytime it was too hot for such suit, so you end up sweating more and attracting even more mosquioes.

Some locals were burning show smoky campfires throughout the day, this is how they were able to stay in their campsite. Others told me they were completely dosed with pesticides. It was a lot better out of the woods and in mowed areas, but they were still biting.

Well, Florida is entering epic battle with mosquitos, looks like, releasing genetically modified ones.
 
I would've thought Alaska would be the "Siberia of the US," lol.

As for Wyoming, there are hardly any jobs there. Not many eligible women if one is looking for a wife etc. Very windy, dry cold and frigid weather; still snowing even now in much of the state I believe. I don't think most of the land is even arable. So as it might be safe or not, it's probably not very livable for most folks.
 

aynrus

Pelican
Bill Gates funded too. You two probably aren't seasoned to mosquitoes, I'd bet. Your comments are very funny though. Are they contained only to certain months?
That seasoning, I assume you mean stopping reacting to the bites after you get bit many times over years. This supposedly only works with local mosquitos where you live and doesn't work when you travel to new location because their saliva is different. Also, supposedly wears off once you stop living where you get bit all the time.

Winter is brutally cold in Michigan, especially Upper/Northern Michigan, so mosquitos only show up in spring, but in the Upper Michigan Penninsula there's also black fly spring season (around May) and these swarms can be so bad they even sent joggers back home bleeding over their face. In my experience mosquitos don't die down until October.
I like camping and spending all the time on the deck/outside so mosquitoes are a deal breaker.
I was able to spend entire spring/summer in KY and TN even sleeping on the deck at night, getting hardly any bites.
 
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I would've thought Alaska would be the "Siberia of the US," lol.

As for Wyoming, there are hardly any jobs there. Not many eligible women if one is looking for a wife etc. Very windy, dry cold and frigid weather; still snowing even now in much of the state I believe. I don't think most of the land is even arable. So as it might be safe or not, it's probably not very livable for most folks.
In a way yes, geographically, but in the context of a place that is left alone from the chaos of modern liberalism, no. I commercial fish in Alaska every summer for about the last 10 years, and I'd say Alaska might be the leading state in terms of freaking out about Covid. They basically don't want lower-48 people traveling there... It seems the outer US territories (kind of lumping AK into this group) are much more prone to watching the mainstream news and taking it literally, hence more prone to panic. I used to want to live in Alaska up until a few years ago, and then all the oil companies left because of fracking and hence many of those jobs left, then many of the fisheries have stopped producing much fish so those jobs are skinny, then Covid hit ruining tourism, so it's not a place you want to be right now both economically and in the context of Covid panic
 

aynrus

Pelican
Yes, exactly, Alaska started to require a test/quarantine to enter/re-enter early on and required it for a while. Just the stealth way to violate interstate commerce clause. (I think they just cancelled statewide restrictions and made the test recommended only) They'll be offering "free vaxx" to arrivals at the airport starting this summer. Plus, there're tons of restrictions in various local boroughs apparently, like no one may leave or enter, that weren't formally cancelled. Inter-village travel there was restricted and required a test.

They spread hoax panic among certain parts of the population but the real reason is separatism, local governments grabbing more power from the federal. The first town in America where one has to get vaxxed to enter any store is in Alaska.
 
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Also, supposedly wears off once you stop living where you get bit all the time.

If I remember correctly, scientifically speaking, your body stops giving off as much carbon dioxide once you've lived around them enough for extended periods and through successive generations.

I never wear any spray and I've been in many remote places throughout the south. Minimal bites, although I do bring a head net for the deepest part of nasty summers if I'm camping. You might want to try a banana around your neck and tucking in your net. Then make sure it's sealed and covering well but don't let the net touch your skin anywhere.
 

aynrus

Pelican
If I remember correctly, scientifically speaking, your body stops giving off as much carbon dioxide once you've lived around them enough for extended periods and through successive generations.

I never wear any spray and I've been in many remote places throughout the south. Minimal bites, although I do bring a head net for the deepest part of nasty summers if I'm camping. You might want to try a banana around your neck and tucking in your net. Then make sure it's sealed and covering well but don't let the net touch your skin anywhere.
South, American South?
I hardly get any mosquito bites in the South being outside all the time. But there's swampy South with mosquitos and drier South, which is where I don't see them, except may be few measly bugs before the rain.
I was talking about thick clouds of mosquotoes in the North.

My understanding is that seasoning against mosquitos is body stopping immune reaction to the bite, but people still receive the bites, and this only lasts until one moved away and stopped getting bites. There might be some genetic protections, otherwise hard to imagine how Native people could live in those places. I know some rare people aren't bothered by mosquito bites, even when there're many of them, but a lot of people who grew up in those areas are still terribly bothered their whole life.
 

aynrus

Pelican
Have to say I'd advise against Kentucky... the level of muzzling is disturbing, even now after CDC partially lifted the mandate and clearly no one in KY is going to enforce it/state mandate is up in 3 weeks - yet, seeing total muzzling ,even in rural locations.

It's a lot better across the sate line down in Tennessee, with 0% masks in some places and no mandates.
The only thing it gets ugly in terms of masks (and ghetto) once you approach big city such as Nashville, even Clarksville.
If someone can live rurally, TN is a much better choice than KY.
KY has Democrat governor and clearly there's big support and compliance with his unconstitutional orders.
TN is way ahead in terms of being free. Of course a county within 1 hour from big city is always going to be worse than a remote rural county, in any state, but if you compare the same types of locations TN got much more freedom.
I literally avoided shopping in KY and would drive over state line for groceries, because of that.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
When I was there (late July that year) they were eating you alive mid-day too...and they'd get inside the screenhouse as you have to get in and out, there're so many of them they just swarm in at any door opening. I was eaten up at night sleeping inside the screenhouse as I don't use chemical repellents, I always had long pants on but my legs were just one big scar because they still get in between socks and pants.

Wyoming is going to be a lot more expensive than Michigan, especially if one wants to buy some land with the house. And drilling a well in WY is going to be an expensive gamble if there's no well already.

WY is a strange place. Its such an ingrained part of the American psyche that most trucks are named after places there. And the images that the word conjures up are, unfortunately, a very small and very expensive part of the state. I had that image too, until I visited. Now my memories are of hot, dry dusty winds howling over the high desert. The snow capped mountains and deep lush valleys are in the NW of the state, much of it protected by park and hollywood money. Most rest of the state is pretty parched, and from what everyone says the winters are pretty harsh.

West of Laramie might not be too bad, but if you need work the Cheyenne area seems to be the only place as Colorado holds a lot of Jobs in Fort Collins.
 
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