Help convince me to become Orthodox

Akinbo77

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
One year ago I had a spiritual awakening that blasted me from being a stereotypical fedora-tipping atheist all the way to a complete theist.
Ever since then, I have been on a quest for truth; attempting to find something that I know is the right path. Certain happenings, which I won't go into precise detail, led me [back] to Christianity (as I was raised a cultural Catholic).
So now I am at a crossroads. While I do have faith in Jesus, I am unsure which 'path' to take, that is, Roman Catholic vs Eastern Orthodox vs Protestantism. Unfortunately it is precisely this question that hampers my faith somewhat, as why should it be so difficult to choose?

I cannot become Roman Catholic because 'I know them by their fruits'. It would be absurd.
As for Protestantism, I must admit that right now I do feel most attracted to it. I know many Protestants and their faith is so incredible compared to Catholics that I know (85% of women in my parish voted to legalise abortion; 90% for gay marriage). I truly believe God brought my girlfriend into my life and she is a devout protestant. But I think Sola Scriptura is unfounded, and this became very apparent to me after I finished the gospels and went onto Acts and beyond.

So that leaves Orthodoxy. There is one church in my whole country which makes things even more difficult.
I have been reading the Orthodox General sub-forum here and it is clear to me that in the West that Orthodoxy is facing the same problems as Catholicism in the sense that they are too involved with politics and furthering the agenda of the ruling class via identity politics, globalism, and new age syncretism which is helping to give ground to the 'Religion of the Future' as well as many other materialistic/satanic agendas. I cannot have faith in that. I can discern it as wicked (as can others judging by the consensus on the sub-forum). It seems that the only groups of people taking a stand against this are certain protestant sects.

So where does that leave me? Orthodoxy places complete emphasis in having complete faith in the church as a whole. I feel I cannot do that by knowing what I know and seeing what I see. We have the Russian Orthodox church which bows to Putin, the aforementioned churches in the West and then that leaves the Greeks and Mt. Athos where there have been many controversies over the years.

So as you can see, I am at quite the standstill in choosing which path to follow. My heart tells me a good protestant sect is where I should look to, for I feel that is more edifying for my spiritual growth than a corrupt 'church'. It is either that or I feel I will eventually look to the East for Truth.

Please point out any incorrect assumptions that I made, I really am at a standstill with my faith.
 

newcomer

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
One year ago I had a spiritual awakening that blasted me from being a stereotypical fedora-tipping atheist all the way to a complete theist.
Ever since then, I have been on a quest for truth; attempting to find something that I know is the right path. Certain happenings, which I won't go into precise detail, led me [back] to Christianity (as I was raised a cultural Catholic).
So now I am at a crossroads. While I do have faith in Jesus, I am unsure which 'path' to take, that is, Roman Catholic vs Eastern Orthodox vs Protestantism. Unfortunately it is precisely this question that hampers my faith somewhat, as why should it be so difficult to choose?

I cannot become Roman Catholic because 'I know them by their fruits'. It would be absurd.
As for Protestantism, I must admit that right now I do feel most attracted to it. I know many Protestants and their faith is so incredible compared to Catholics that I know (85% of women in my parish voted to legalise abortion; 90% for gay marriage). I truly believe God brought my girlfriend into my life and she is a devout protestant. But I think Sola Scriptura is unfounded, and this became very apparent to me after I finished the gospels and went onto Acts and beyond.

So that leaves Orthodoxy. There is one church in my whole country which makes things even more difficult.
I have been reading the Orthodox General sub-forum here and it is clear to me that in the West that Orthodoxy is facing the same problems as Catholicism in the sense that they are too involved with politics and furthering the agenda of the ruling class via identity politics, globalism, and new age syncretism which is helping to give ground to the 'Religion of the Future' as well as many other materialistic/satanic agendas. I cannot have faith in that. I can discern it as wicked (as can others judging by the consensus on the sub-forum). It seems that the only groups of people taking a stand against this are certain protestant sects.

So where does that leave me? Orthodoxy places complete emphasis in having complete faith in the church as a whole. I feel I cannot do that by knowing what I know and seeing what I see. We have the Russian Orthodox church which bows to Putin, the aforementioned churches in the West and then that leaves the Greeks and Mt. Athos where there have been many controversies over the years.

So as you can see, I am at quite the standstill in choosing which path to follow. My heart tells me a good protestant sect is where I should look to, for I feel that is more edifying for my spiritual growth than a corrupt 'church'. It is either that or I feel I will eventually look to the East for Truth.

Please point out any incorrect assumptions that I made, I really am at a standstill with my faith.
Check the Protestantism vs Orthodoxy thread.
 

OrthoCole

Sparrow
Orthodox Catechumen
One year ago I had a spiritual awakening that blasted me from being a stereotypical fedora-tipping atheist all the way to a complete theist.
Ever since then, I have been on a quest for truth; attempting to find something that I know is the right path. Certain happenings, which I won't go into precise detail, led me [back] to Christianity (as I was raised a cultural Catholic).
So now I am at a crossroads. While I do have faith in Jesus, I am unsure which 'path' to take, that is, Roman Catholic vs Eastern Orthodox vs Protestantism. Unfortunately it is precisely this question that hampers my faith somewhat, as why should it be so difficult to choose?

I cannot become Roman Catholic because 'I know them by their fruits'. It would be absurd.
As for Protestantism, I must admit that right now I do feel most attracted to it. I know many Protestants and their faith is so incredible compared to Catholics that I know (85% of women in my parish voted to legalise abortion; 90% for gay marriage). I truly believe God brought my girlfriend into my life and she is a devout protestant. But I think Sola Scriptura is unfounded, and this became very apparent to me after I finished the gospels and went onto Acts and beyond.

So that leaves Orthodoxy. There is one church in my whole country which makes things even more difficult.
I have been reading the Orthodox General sub-forum here and it is clear to me that in the West that Orthodoxy is facing the same problems as Catholicism in the sense that they are too involved with politics and furthering the agenda of the ruling class via identity politics, globalism, and new age syncretism which is helping to give ground to the 'Religion of the Future' as well as many other materialistic/satanic agendas. I cannot have faith in that. I can discern it as wicked (as can others judging by the consensus on the sub-forum). It seems that the only groups of people taking a stand against this are certain protestant sects.

So where does that leave me? Orthodoxy places complete emphasis in having complete faith in the church as a whole. I feel I cannot do that by knowing what I know and seeing what I see. We have the Russian Orthodox church which bows to Putin, the aforementioned churches in the West and then that leaves the Greeks and Mt. Athos where there have been many controversies over the years.

So as you can see, I am at quite the standstill in choosing which path to follow. My heart tells me a good protestant sect is where I should look to, for I feel that is more edifying for my spiritual growth than a corrupt 'church'. It is either that or I feel I will eventually look to the East for Truth.

Please point out any incorrect assumptions that I made, I really am at a standstill with my faith.
I would suggest to visit your local Orthodox Church and speak with the Priest, ask for a morning/evening prayer rule and if you want to do some reading then read the lives of our Saints. It's important to understand Orthodoxy as it is lived, not just on the internet.

As you are discerning it's important to remember that no local Parish is perfect but we are not looking for perfection we are seeking Christ. Also, don't jump to any conclusions or make assumptions if you don't understand something, seek out answers from a knowledgeable Priest or Elder.

I hope this helps, God Bless you!
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Are you coming at this with an open mind?
Some of your comments seem to be broad, sweeping criticisms.

For example, when I think of the Russian Church, I think of pious men with long beards upholding virtue and good, not "a group that bows to Putin" (whatever that means).

When I think of my local church, I think of it as completely apolitical, not something too bogged down in politics like other churches (I don't even see that in most Protestant mainstream churches to be honest.

When I think of the Greek church, I don't focus on its controversies. And of course the same holds true for the Catholics. I do think that the Catholic prohibition on priests marrying is a large reason for the sexual problems it has had, but I don't condemn the whole church because of this error, wrong though it may be.

Just remember than all men are sinners, that none of us are perfect. But look for the church that teaches Truth. The errors of the Orthodox church, where they may exist, seem to be with its practices, not with its principles and teachings. Seek out the truth, and keep in mind that nothing in this world will be perfect.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
The Orthodox Church is theanthropic; it is the Body of Christ so, like Christ, it is both divine and human. The divine part is immutable, eternal, stainless and perfect. But unlike Christ’s humanity, the Church’s humanity is made of fallen sinners and is thus often corrupt, imperfect, weak, and otherwise compromised. However, the fact of fallen humanity has no impact on the eternal perfection of the Church itself, which has its roots in Heaven since it is the Body of Christ Himself. You will never find a perfect parish, a perfect priest, or a perfect bishop; if those are your standards, you will end up like the others who thought of themselves as “too holy” for the rest of us lowly sinners and wound up alone with no community, Sacraments, worship, or salvation. There is no way to understand Orthodoxy from the outside (and many would argue it can’t be truly understood from within either while one is still in the flesh). You must live it and experience it for yourself. It will “prove” itself to you as your humility and obedience grow, so I encourage you to find a parish you like and do what everyone else is doing for awhile. Get to know people, read the Lives of the Saints. Eventually things will begin to make more sense and you will discover something that cannot truly be found outside the Church.
 

Lawrence87

Woodpecker
Orthodox
The Orthodox Church doesn't profess that the Church itself cannot fall into error at times, and it has done in history. The hierarchs of the Church can indeed be misled. The Orthodox do believe however that Orthodoxy will prevail and that those who lead it into error will not succeed in doing so. An example of this would be when Sergius decreed that the Russian Church should capitulate to the Soviets, there is nothing to say that such things cannot or will not happen, but that the Church will always prevail, as it did recover from Sergianism after the fall of communism.

However, one should not be so keen to dismiss hierarchs, or indeed entire jursidictions of the Church based on one's own whims. People who do this tend to just end up in schismatic, hyper "correct" minority groups. For example there are schismatics who refuse to accept that the Moscow Patriarchate could possibly have recovered from Sergianism, and broke away from ROCOR when ROCOR and the MP reunited. In so doing they lost grace, through their own pride and arrogance.

TLDR: The Church can and does fall into error, however we as mere laymen ought not be fast to declare the Church to be in error
 

Akinbo77

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
Thank you for the responses everyone, it is helpful
But make sure to attend a latin mass first
Didn't the pope ban them? If so, isn't it already a red flag that going to one undermines the infallible pope? While Catholicism is the easiest choice for me, being in a Catholic country, I cannot as my heart is not in it. I have zero faith in that Church whatsoever.

Why not just convince yourself. You could read Timothy Ware’s The Orthodox Church. You could read the Apostolic Fathers. You could watch the videos from St Elijah Antiochian Orthodox Church in Oklahoma. https://stelijahokc.com/ try that for starters.
It's a long process of learning. I am new to it all still. The Church Fathers are next on my list for sure. As for those videos I'm pretty sure I watched 'Finding the Church Jesus built' from the same church? They were very persuasive.

The Church must be experienced
I am going to do this next Sunday, although the church is three hours away from me

Are you coming at this with an open mind?
Some of your comments seem to be broad, sweeping criticisms.
I am, and I acknowledge that but I assure you these generalisations are from my lack of knowledge and basic understanding of the Church. I understand it is much harder to point out error within Orthodoxy than it is Catholicism due to the nature of the churches, so apologies for that.
For example, when I think of the Russian Church, I think of pious men with long beards upholding virtue and good, not "a group that bows to Putin" (whatever that means).
I understand that there are holy and pious people everywhere. But I believe that the authority is under Putin's thumb, in that they are too closely coupled in politics. I mean I could be wrong, I admit I do not know enough of the situation but judging by the taxpayer built Cathedral with its complete emphasis on the Russian military rather than Christ, and other situations I believe it to be the case. But I should not be so quick to judge everything associated with it as Lawrence87 pointed out.

The problem for me is that there is only one church in my country (Greek I believe), I don't have the opportunity to look elsewhere in case it is plagued by what I said. I just want to make sure what I am doing is certain.
Seek out the truth, and keep in mind that nothing in this world will be perfect.
Unfortunately I believe you are right.
The Orthodox Church is theanthropic; it is the Body of Christ so, like Christ, it is both divine and human. The divine part is immutable, eternal, stainless and perfect. But unlike Christ’s humanity, the Church’s humanity is made of fallen sinners and is thus often corrupt, imperfect, weak, and otherwise compromised. However, the fact of fallen humanity has no impact on the eternal perfection of the Church itself, which has its roots in Heaven since it is the Body of Christ Himself. You will never find a perfect parish, a perfect priest, or a perfect bishop; if those are your standards, you will end up like the others who thought of themselves as “too holy” for the rest of us lowly sinners and wound up alone with no community, Sacraments, worship, or salvation. There is no way to understand Orthodoxy from the outside (and many would argue it can’t be truly understood from within either while one is still in the flesh). You must live it and experience it for yourself. It will “prove” itself to you as your humility and obedience grow, so I encourage you to find a parish you like and do what everyone else is doing for awhile. Get to know people, read the Lives of the Saints. Eventually things will begin to make more sense and you will discover something that cannot truly be found outside the Church.

This is a good way of looking at it. I really don't want to come across as prideful, but it is important to understand that this is a lifetime decision & commitment and as such I want to be sure that I am doing the right thing.

__

"...However, when I entered an Orthodox Church for the first time (a Russian Church in San Francisco), something happened to me that I had not experienced in any Buddhist or other Eastern temple; something in my heart said that this was “home”, that all my search was over."

This is the certainty that I want.

Also, from the Orthodox Study bible, is there any pdf anywhere that has only the annotations? I would like to read the notes alongside my Oxford Study Bible. I can see that that it doesn't have verse-by-verse annotations but has summaries after major parts of each book
 

DRIIIVER

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Thank you for the responses everyone, it is helpful

Didn't the pope ban them? If so, isn't it already a red flag that going to one undermines the infallible pope? While Catholicism is the easiest choice for me, being in a Catholic country, I cannot as my heart is not in it. I have zero faith in that Church whatsoever.


It's a long process of learning. I am new to it all still. The Church Fathers are next on my list for sure. As for those videos I'm pretty sure I watched 'Finding the Church Jesus built' from the same church? They were very persuasive.


I am going to do this next Sunday, although the church is three hours away from me


I am, and I acknowledge that but I assure you these generalisations are from my lack of knowledge and basic understanding of the Church. I understand it is much harder to point out error within Orthodoxy than it is Catholicism due to the nature of the churches, so apologies for that.

I understand that there are holy and pious people everywhere. But I believe that the authority is under Putin's thumb, in that they are too closely coupled in politics. I mean I could be wrong, I admit I do not know enough of the situation but judging by the taxpayer built Cathedral with its complete emphasis on the Russian military rather than Christ, and other situations I believe it to be the case. But I should not be so quick to judge everything associated with it as Lawrence87 pointed out.

The problem for me is that there is only one church in my country (Greek I believe), I don't have the opportunity to look elsewhere in case it is plagued by what I said. I just want to make sure what I am doing is certain.

Unfortunately I believe you are right.


This is a good way of looking at it. I really don't want to come across as prideful, but it is important to understand that this is a lifetime decision & commitment and as such I want to be sure that I am doing the right thing.

__

"...However, when I entered an Orthodox Church for the first time (a Russian Church in San Francisco), something happened to me that I had not experienced in any Buddhist or other Eastern temple; something in my heart said that this was “home”, that all my search was over."

This is the certainty that I want.

Also, from the Orthodox Study bible, is there any pdf anywhere that has only the annotations? I would like to read the notes alongside my Oxford Study Bible. I can see that that it doesn't have verse-by-verse annotations but has summaries after major parts of each book
I was just reading about this on Orthodox Info and it seemed relevant. This is an excerpt from:

Hope - Chapter 99 from Father Seraphim Rose: His Life and Works​

but linked is the full Chapter:
In a passage from Orthodox Dogmatic Theology which Fr. Seraphim translated into English, Fr. Michael Pomazansky wrote: "The sanctity of the Church is not darkened by the intrusion of the world into the Church, or by the sinfulness of men. Everything sinful and worldly which intrudes into the Church's sphere remains foreign to it and is destined to be sifted out and destroyed, like weed seeds at sowing time. The opinion that the Church consists only of righteous and holy people without sin does not agree with the direct teaching of Christ and His Apostles. The Saviour compares His Church with a field in which the wheat grows together with the tares, and again, with a net which draws out of the water both good fish and bad. In the Church there are both good servants and bad ones (Matt. 18:23–35), wise virgins and foolish (Matt. 25:1–13)."
 

Sword and Board

Kingfisher
Is this a genuine outreach or a subtle dig at Catholics, Orthodox, “corrupt” Christianity and Putin.

Apologies if not and good luck on your spiritual journey with the Orthodox Church if that is the path you follow.
 

Liviu

Sparrow
Orthodox
I am a Christian-orthodox theologian living in Romania.

The essential for your quest has been already written here. Indeed experience of the Church cannot be replaced with anything. Reading Holy Bible,the life of saints, holy fathers of the Church and new fathers like father Seraphim Rose are ideal readings at the beginning.

A very good reading (and very important for someone in your position) is the book

`Becoming Orthodox: A journey to the Ancient Christian Faith` by Peter Gillquist .

You can find it on amazon on kindle and in physical format

Peter Gillquist is a former protestant pastor who was searching for Christ from the time he was a student, and who, after about twenty years of study and quest, together with many other pastors and their entire parishes became orthodox. I think in this book you could find many of the answers you want, shorting thus your quest.

If the time will come, God willing, you could think about changing your country also. This American priest in America has been only deacon. A few words of his wife and him after receiving a distinction from his metropolitan in Iași, Romania after the holy liturgy commemorating Saint Paraschiva, patron of the city

 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I understand that there are holy and pious people everywhere. But I believe that the authority is under Putin's thumb, in that they are too closely coupled in politics. I mean I could be wrong, I admit I do not know enough of the situation but judging by the taxpayer built Cathedral with its complete emphasis on the Russian military rather than Christ, and other situations I believe it to be the case. But I should not be so quick to judge everything associated with it as Lawrence87 pointed out.
I'm unfamiliar with this claim about Vladimir Putin controlling the church.
But even if that were so, would it invalidate any of the church's beliefs or teachings?
The Church has been through all sorts of political and power dynamics in the past, but it doesn't make the church teachings flawed or untrue.

Why is it that you seek a church? I think it would be helpful for you to verbalize it and explain what it is you are seeking.

I need the church for fellowship, for guidance from my priest, to participate in the sacraments. None of those things are affected by men or politicians behaving imperfectly. I would focus much more on the priest and the congregation, which is primarily what I'm there for. Fellowship and leadership in worshipping God.
 

Akinbo77

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
Is this a genuine outreach or a subtle dig at Catholics, Orthodox, “corrupt” Christianity and Putin.

Apologies if not and good luck on your spiritual journey with the Orthodox Church if that is the path you follow.
It is genuine. I wouldn't make a thread here and waste people's time if I wasn't.
Ignore the Putin comment if you must, my intent wasn't to emphasise politics. It is important to understand that I am new to this and I am just calling things as I see them, I am not saying that it they are necessarily the case. I am just being cautious.
Is it a subtle dig at Catholics? Not really, I just don't like the Catholic Church for reasons that I won't go into, although they are probably obvious. I just do not see how I could possibly go back to it.

I was just reading about this on Orthodox Info and it seemed relevant. This is an excerpt from:

Hope - Chapter 99 from Father Seraphim Rose: His Life and Works​

but linked is the full Chapter:
This is fair, I understand it now, the Parable of the Sower comes to mind. I think my initial feelings on this was due to prejudice from the Catholic Church, in the sense that [IMO] it has become completely corrupt.
What do Orthodox think of this? Do they think the corruption will be 'sifted out and destroyed' there as well?

I am a Christian-orthodox theologian living in Romania.

The essential for your quest has been already written here. Indeed experience of the Church cannot be replaced with anything. Reading Holy Bible,the life of saints, holy fathers of the Church and new fathers like father Seraphim Rose are ideal readings at the beginning.

A very good reading (and very important for someone in your position) is the book

`Becoming Orthodox: A journey to the Ancient Christian Faith` by Peter Gillquist .

...​

Thank you, I will read that. I don't see myself leaving this country anytime soon. Greece is definitely an option down the line, but not for a while at least. Like I said, there is one (or two) churches here although they are very small, and even though it is a journey every Sunday it would be something I am willing to do until that point. I think most other countries in Europe regardless if they are Catholic or Protestant have many more churches than here (Ireland).
I'm unfamiliar with this claim about Vladimir Putin controlling the church.
But even if that were so, would it invalidate any of the church's beliefs or teachings?
The Church has been through all sorts of political and power dynamics in the past, but it doesn't make the church teachings flawed or untrue.

Why is it that you seek a church? I think it would be helpful for you to verbalize it and explain what it is you are seeking.

I need the church for fellowship, for guidance from my priest, to participate in the sacraments. None of those things are affected by men or politicians behaving imperfectly. I would focus much more on the priest and the congregation, which is primarily what I'm there for. Fellowship and leadership in worshipping God.
I just worried modernity would get in the way, but like you said there have been worse times than now for the Orthodox, namely communism. I do think that the powers that be have religion in their crosshairs (not to kill, but corrupt) but there is nothing I can do about that but have trust and faith in the Church.

I seek a church because I feel I have been on a spiritual journey for almost two years now. While I was comfortable following my intuition and learning about various things, I feel I am at somewhat at a standstill now. I am at the point now where I have vast more wisdom about things compared to the start, but I now believe that I need to commit to something to get to where I want to be. Knowing that there are many paths that lead to at best; nowhere and at worst; damnation, I require guidance from those that are much more holier and wiser than me. I just cannot commit to anything unless I am absolutely sure. Ultimately, I want Truth.
"...However, when I entered an Orthodox Church for the first time (a Russian Church in San Francisco), something happened to me that I had not experienced in any Buddhist or other Eastern temple; something in my heart said that this was “home”, that all my search was over."
^ This is what I need to be sure of.

__

Also on an unrelated note, I forgot to ask in my OP (I'm sure there have been plenty of apologetical work for this but):

Why is Mary venerated so much, where does it come from? I understand she is the new Abraham and Ark of the Covenant but I don't understand the veneration whatsoever and its purpose.

The same thing for saints.

Also similarly, what about relics? Why isn't this idolatry?
 

Lawrence87

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Why is Mary venerated so much, where does it come from? I understand she is the new Abraham and Ark of the Covenant but I don't understand the veneration whatsoever and its purpose.
Can you think of anything more laudible than submitting to the will of God, bearing and nursing the Saviour of mankind? There is nothing done throughout history by men or angels that compares to this. Literally nothing. This alone is worthy of veneration. God did not just randomly choose any old woman for this task. She is the most remarkable woman in history. Nothing you, or I, or anyone else now, or for the rest of time will ever come close to what she did for us all. Why isn't that worthy of veneration?

The same thing for saints.

Ultimately when we venerate the Saints we are glorifying Christ, because it was through Christ that the Saints achieved holiness. If someone is transformed by Christ, and because of this does great things for mankind, why would you not venerate them? Why wouldn't you read about how they lived and try to emulate it?

The reason we pray to the Theotokos and the Saints is quite simply because we understand that they are not dead, they are with Christ in heaven, and they can bring our prayers to Him. Mary in particular has a unique position in this regard because she has a unique connection with Christ, being His mother. The idea that you shouldn't pray for the dead, or ask the Saints or Mary to intercede for us is akin to denying the afterlife. As Christians we believe in the afterlife, why would we not pray for the dead, and ask the Saints for their intercessions?
 

ElChico

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
Hello, I read your post and found it relatable. I was also raised catholic, in a heavily catholic country (Mexico). I also was atheist for a couple years, then slowly I started to believe in spiritual things, agnostic, and finally came back to Christ. I understand how you feel about the Catholic church. I have felt it too. I find it hard to submit to it when I have learned all of its past and current wrongs. Specially after discovering the Orthodox church, which I have felt the most truth Ive heard about Christ has been from Orthodox teachings. They keep the main truth of our faith, unchanged, true to its fundamentals, unlike catholicism, which constantly updates, for the worse.

The problem for me, is, that there are almost no churches in my country, allegedly the 0.00012% of the population is Orthodox. The closest church is probably in the capital, which is too far to go in car. I honestly have no idea what God wants for me, to stay here, or eventually move.

I say, you could read from Orthodox saints, and go to the church to experience it. Its the one church I really have faith in.
 

Akinbo77

Chicken
Orthodox Inquirer
Thanks for your replies everyone, I think I have everything I wondered about answered. It is up to me now to go and experience this myself. I was supposed to travel to go to Divine Liturgy two weeks ago but I was unable to and there are probably more bullshit restrictions on the horizon...

I say, you could read from Orthodox saints, and go to the church to experience it. Its the one church I really have faith in.
This is the next step
 
Top