Heph's daily journey away from 30-something NEETdom

Hephaestus

Sparrow
Well, I guess time for another update.

I managed to find real estate work in January, which fell apart as soon as the border was closed.

I wasted so much time this year, neetbux were doubled this year, and combined with stress, I wasted so much time online and gaming. (This is just one game)
4AJoIc8.jpg

Didn't do much learning either. Wasted wasted wasted. Finding work is hard, but that was no excuse to not study.

I met a cute girl the other month. Went out a few times, but she lost all interest in me when I said I was between jobs.
It's hard to find something real, when you have no apparent future.

Last week, I enrolled in an IT course at a local university. The government is subsidising it, but I find it hard to stay focused.
I'm really not interested in it; Project Management/Databases(SQL etc)/Information Systems/Software Engineering.

It's hard to stay engaged in abstract online material delivered in an order you aren't interested, especially when you have a problem with internet addiction. Taking four courses all at once is a bit much as I tire easily, but the government subsidy may only last until the end of the year.
If the time restriction wasn't an issue, I'd probably drop everything except Software engineering, and pursue my own things with the rest of my time next year when I'll do the remaining 3 modules once I'm in a better headspace.

I could learn this stuff equally as well on my own. COULD, but I've had well over 34 years to learn this stuff and I haven't. The reason I signed up for this course despite its lack of programming is the university's brand name would show my aptitude enough to get them to look at my github. That and I was hoping the girl would give me another chance. (She didn't but I'm meeting someone else tomorrow, so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ )

I'm not sure anyone would want to employ me anyway. Distractable, easy-to-tire, old, privileged and not very well connected.

In any case, I'll work my hardest this next week, then speak with the university's disablity support to see how best to move forward.
 

Hephaestus

Sparrow
I ended up dropping all but one module due to my PC dying on me and losing all my work.

Bad news, but the silver lining is I cannot play any games on my laptop.

I have a external monitor, and I suppose I can salvage the stuff I haven't backed up when I put together a new computer. Shame about my Chinese flashcards though.
 

Hephaestus

Sparrow
I managed to fix, then mess up my computer again, basically it is net negative on my life, as games can be pretty distracting.

I've improved my habits
  • I get up before the dawn, due to removing my curtains.
  • I do at least some exercise every day.
  • I have a sustained spoken conversation with someone at least once a day.
  • I've long given up porn.(again curtains)
  • I try to go out socially at least once a week. (Australia is pretty much virus free)

I cannot find any real estate work, it's a dead industry for new entrants, I have a big plan of my own, which I'm gradually learning how to implement. I have a friend in another nearby city who's holding me to task about it, so hopefully I won't backslide. I don't think there's much hope for a conventional career for someone of my age, education and background, so I must make my own.

I'm going to study hard for at least three of the next five days, and report on in here.
 

yarqur

Sparrow
no offense but: no clue what NEET is... will not look up.
Thank you for your input?


I was curious so I looked it up:
NEET, an acronym for "Not in Education, Employment, or Training", refers to a person who is unemployed and not receiving an education or vocational training. The classification originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1990s, and its use has spread, in varying degrees, to other countries and regions, including Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, Canada and the United States. The NEET category includes the unemployed (individuals without a job and seeking one), as well as individuals outside the labour force (without a job and not seeking one).
 

Mr Gibbs

Woodpecker
Dude if i was you and your still feeling disillusioned about college, IT and real estate I would highly, highly recommend looking into a skilled trade.

Sheet metal, pipe fitter, carpenter, electrician, millwright there’s a lot out there.

I mean you’ll learn an interesting skill get payed for it and set your retirement up all while having a feeling of accomplishment at the end of the day or project. It can be tough, grueling and annoying at times, but rewarding and easy going at others.

Although I’m not sure how it is in Australia, but I imagine I can’t be too different from the US.

Food for thought.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Dude if i was you and your still feeling disillusioned about college, IT and real estate I would highly, highly recommend looking into a skilled trade.

Sheet metal, pipe fitter, carpenter, electrician, millwright there’s a lot out there.

I mean you’ll learn an interesting skill get payed for it and set your retirement up all while having a feeling of accomplishment at the end of the day or project. It can be tough, grueling and annoying at times, but rewarding and easy going at others.

Although I’m not sure how it is in Australia, but I imagine I can’t be too different from the US.

Food for thought.
I've heard that it's almost impossible to find a plumber under the age of 50 in the US. Probably in Australia too, as you note. You can make great money as a plumber too, if you have a lot of experience and only moreso as time passes and there are fewer and fewer competent plumbers around. It's the kind of job that can't be shipped overseas to India too. I have a decent career, but if I were a young man starting out now, I think I'd be a plumber.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I've heard that it's almost impossible to find a plumber under the age of 50 in the US. Probably in Australia too, as you note. You can make great money as a plumber too, if you have a lot of experience and only moreso as time passes and there are fewer and fewer competent plumbers around. It's the kind of job that can't be shipped overseas to India too. I have a decent career, but if I were a young man starting out now, I think I'd be a plumber.
I'm in a similar position. But, if I was 22 and looking for something to do, I'd...
1. Pick a trade (plumber, locksmith, mechanic) and become an expert at said trade
2. Save up a boatload of cash
3. Open a business for said trade

This is a great website that details how to do step 3:
 

Mr Gibbs

Woodpecker
I've heard that it's almost impossible to find a plumber under the age of 50 in the US. Probably in Australia too, as you note. You can make great money as a plumber too, if you have a lot of experience and only moreso as time passes and there are fewer and fewer competent plumbers around. It's the kind of job that can't be shipped overseas to India too. I have a decent career, but if I were a young man starting out now, I think I'd be a plumber.
Exactly and something people may not think about is that firstly you won’t have to hire a plumber to work on your house. When you become a journeyman you ought to have the skills necessary.

Secondly you can do side jobs and set how much you’d like to be payed, granted your skill level is up too snuff as in someone tells you the problem and you’re able to get in and do the work with little to no details.

Thirdly you can help your friends and family out when there are problems that arise or they have questions or need systems to be entirely redone.

Fourthly let’s say someone is building a house you can be part of that process and make some pretty solid financial returns.

Fifthly you can meet some solid guys, usually people are too tired or busy to worry about PC BS. Although it’s weaseling it’s way in but for the most part guys are pretty right wing despite unions historically being for the Democrats etc.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Exactly and something people may not think about is that firstly you won’t have to hire a plumber to work on your house. When you become a journeyman you ought to have the skills necessary.

Secondly you can do side jobs and set how much you’d like to be payed, granted your skill level is up too snuff as in someone tells you the problem and you’re able to get in and do the work with little to no details.

Thirdly you can help your friends and family out when there are problems that arise or they have questions or need systems to be entirely redone.

Fourthly let’s say someone is building a house you can be part of that process and make some pretty solid financial returns.

Fifthly you can meet some solid guys, usually people are too tired or busy to worry about PC BS. Although it’s weaseling it’s way in but for the most part guys are pretty right wing despite unions historically being for the Democrats etc.
Absolutely agree. I never owned a house until I was well into middle age, so I'm far behind on figuring out how to do home repairs and maintenance myself, although I'm slowly getting there. Through a friend I found a very competent handyman who's in his 60s and not certified in any of the work he does, which includes electrical, plumbing and almost anything else you can think of, so his rates are very low and he still knows it all. One thing I definitely envy is how he can do all the work he does on his own place himself.

I'm in a higher-end IT job, which people think of as more prestigious than being a plumber, electrician, etc. but I wouldn't be surprised if guys in those jobs with decades of experience make about as much as I do, and they'll likely surpass me in the future as the number of competent, experienced people in their field continues to dwindle.
 

Hephaestus

Sparrow
Another positive update.
For the last few weeks, I've had an IT graduate friend monitor my github, and chase me up if I haven't made any commits. I do the same for her and we both keep each other motivated. We've both been very productive.
Having a friend who I don't have to conceal my situation from is very liberating as once you start lying, it is is easy to manufacture excuses for laziness.

I'm in a higher-end IT job, which people think of as more prestigious than being a plumber, electrician, etc. but I wouldn't be surprised if guys in those jobs with decades of experience make about as much as I do, and they'll likely surpass me in the future as the number of competent, experienced people in their field continues to dwindle.
From what I understand, tradies start earning a decent wage as soon as they finish their cheap TAFE college course and apprenticeship. I have really considered it, and I'll be up for it at the start of next year, should everything else fail. The income does reach a ceiling unless you start your own firm.
Australia has been weened off its dependence on skilled immigration since the borders have closed, so it'll be less likely wages will be suppressed.

I used to dismiss it categorically, as I have bad coordination/balance, but these few months, I've been practicing yoga, and I've improved a lot

Dude if i was you and your still feeling disillusioned about college, IT and real estate I would highly, highly recommend looking into a skilled trade.

Sheet metal, pipe fitter, carpenter, electrician, millwright there’s a lot out there.

I mean you’ll learn an interesting skill get payed for it and set your retirement up all while having a feeling of accomplishment at the end of the day or project. It can be tough, grueling and annoying at times, but rewarding and easy going at others.
Yes, something that's got me down is the lack of things I've created. I did an engineering internship 14 years ago, and my little part of it still stands today. What you are saying is making a lot of sense.
 

Hephaestus

Sparrow
Starting to make things now, testing and planning is a third of the work, writing is another third, and finding bugs, the last.

The IT friend has found full time work, so has less time for me unfortunately, but still, she's holding me semiaccountable.

I might also have a girlfriend, but I'm taking it slow because of an age gap.

I'll write another update in a few more weeks.
 

The Penitent Man

Kingfisher
I've heard that it's almost impossible to find a plumber under the age of 50 in the US. Probably in Australia too, as you note. You can make great money as a plumber too, if you have a lot of experience and only moreso as time passes and there are fewer and fewer competent plumbers around. It's the kind of job that can't be shipped overseas to India too. I have a decent career, but if I were a young man starting out now, I think I'd be a plumber.

I second this. I have a buddy (30’s) who is a plumber and took over the family business. Does great work and makes a killing. Extremely valuable skill set and very respectable.
 

Hephaestus

Sparrow
Well... I'm back.

I've started streaming my coding/studying on Twitch, which has definitely been helping, especially when I use autohotkey to automatically start recording as soon as I start my PC.
I'm trying to use the principle between the panopticon to make me act like I'm being watched.

If you are curious, my account is my RVF username, + focus.
 
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