Homeschooling

Roosh

Cardinal
It looks like homeschooling will rapidly increase in popularity, but the state is hesitant to give up control:
Public schools across the United States are making it harder for parents to withdraw their children from those schools amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA).

As HSLDA’s Thomas J. Schmidt, a lawyer, told Fox News, many parents are “shocked” to find they cannot simply take their children out of public schools.

“The most egregious situations I’ve had have been in Florida,” Schmidt said. “But I’ve had numerous parents in a couple of different counties told, ‘we’re not allowed to withdraw students right now’ … They’re trying to hold onto these students.”

“We see this across the country,” the lawyer added. “I’ve had school officials attempt to prevent or dissuade parents from pulling their kids out.”
 

Sombro

Ostrich
Most troubling, though, is the apparent desire of the anti-alternative education faction to shove all children in America into a monolithic system of public schooling, or at the very least, to force those who teach them to adopt a monolithic public school model for education. That model would be replete with whatever pedagogic fads—“everyday” math, “whole word” reading—may be responsible for American children’s generally poor academic performance these days. Worse, it would include a range of secular ideologies to which children are required to be “exposed” that claim to be “mainstream” but are often as insular, as hostile to opposing viewpoints, and as “totalizing” (to use one of Reich’s words) as those of the most fanatical Christians. “I’m not particularly religious, but the anti-religious bias is so thick you can cut it with a knife,” said New York University law professor Richard A. Epstein, an outspoken critic of the “positive rights” jurisprudence that marked both Bartholet’s article and the Gary B. decision. “What they want to do is give the state complete monopoly powers over education.”
https://quillette.com/2020/05/23/the-fight-over-alternative-education/
 

Matianus

Sparrow
School districts are paid by the state depending on the attendance and enrollment of students. Less students = less money for the school districts. These school districts (especially in large cities) are top heavy with administrators and paper pushers. They are also backed by powerful unions and lobbyist groups. Likely, they see home schooling as an existential threat to their careers and livelihood. I wouldn't be surprised if one of these cases from the article ends up in the US Supreme Court. As long as a parent can demonstrate that their child is being educated, they should be able to homeschool them. Any argument otherwise appears unconstitutional.
 

Hypno

Hummingbird
What Matianus said.

Homeschooling has merit but its not cost effective. Its popular because a lot of women want to stay home rather than return to work. That sounds like the right thing to do, but private school tuition is about 12,000 for the early years and 25,000 for the later years. Anyone with a heartbeat could earn more than that at a job. Women have been pushing homeschooling so they don't have to work in the real world.
 

kel

Pelican
To me the ideal "homeschool" is a few women in a community teaching all the kids in that community. Basically the "one room schoolhouse" model. It becomes a lot more financially efficient that way, though looking at this as a purely financial transaction is kinda vulgar, and in a just world the homeschoolers would be able to get the money (or at least some fraction of it) that institutional schools get on a per-student basis.
 

acco

Woodpecker
Homeschooling is allowed in Austria, but not in Germany.

A family with young children (before the age of 6) should consider to move to Austria, since socialism is an intrinsic part of eduacation (kintergarten and schhol) as well as politics and media.
 

Hypno

Hummingbird
To me the ideal "homeschool" is a few women in a community teaching all the kids in that community. Basically the "one room schoolhouse" model. It becomes a lot more financially efficient that way, though looking at this as a purely financial transaction is kinda vulgar, and in a just world the homeschoolers would be able to get the money (or at least some fraction of it) that institutional schools get on a per-student basis.
Yes the realities of homeschooling are vulgar and do not match your utopian vision.

There are some positives about homeschooling including opportunities for working fathers. I helped to found a home school only Cub Scout troop, and then a Trail Life troop. I also coached home schoolers in sports.

There is a spectrum of educational opportunities here from public school, private schools, parochial schools, hybrid schools, home schools, and unschooling. I have experience with all of them except for your imaginary government funded one room school house. You can get something like that experience via Montessori.
 
I was homeschooled K-12, as were my numerous siblings. If I have ever have children, I would definitely prefer to homeschool them. A few advantages:
- You can tailor the curriculum to match the student, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.
- It's much more time efficient, since the student can work at their own pace rather than the pace of the weakest link in the chain.
- It is easier to teach your children a good worldview when there's no SJW education major chick shoving trans activism and anti-religious propoganda down their throats for 40 hours a week.

Potential challenges:
- The main reason I've heard people say they wouldn't homeschool is socialization. If you're in a major city, there's probably a homeschool group you can join for fieldtrips and sports, etc. If that's not an option, there are still other ways for you child to make friends besides 40 hours a week at a government indoctrination center.
- Sports. Depending on where you live, there might be homeschool sports teams, or you kids might be allowed to play on public school teams. Same goes for band. Also, I know it's 2020 now and this is heresy, but I think organized sports are a nice option rather than an absolute necessity.
- If you suck at teaching, it might not work. But teaching is not as difficult as some people imagine it to be. By the time my siblings and I got to middle school, my mom basically handed us the textbooks and graded our work when we were finished. It's not like she had to be an expert on every subject we were learning.
- Highschool diploma. Colleges take homeschooled students, and so does the US military. You just have to take the time to figure out the process. Also, correspondence school is an option if you want your kids to have official diplomas.

Homeschooling worked out very well for my siblings. They got full academic scholarships to college and earned their bachelor's and master's degrees in useful fields. I'm the black sheep of the family.
 

kamoz

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Find a good decent priced online homeschool course and you're good. I initially thought this would be a good opportunity to get into the business and develop courseware but there's a ton already out there. I guess what I'd be curious about is how does a parent go about using an online course as part of homeschooling "officially?"
 

jakester318

Sparrow
It looks like homeschooling will rapidly increase in popularity, but the state is hesitant to give up control:

It looks like it's time for Americans to start making some difficult decisions. I think for many leftists, they are finally seeing how the Democratic approach to Corona—lock yourself in at all costs—is destroying the economic vitality of their communities. And I think for some of them, they may finally have had enough. Here in Texas, businesses have gone back to work and things have started moving forward. But back in the Northeast, they are still locked down for another month.

My feeling is you are going to start seeing major shifts in population for many states. I know if I were living in a hard-left state right now, plans would already be underway to get the hell out. Glad I left Connecticut a few years ago.
 
What Matianus said.

Homeschooling has merit but its not cost effective. Its popular because a lot of women want to stay home rather than return to work. That sounds like the right thing to do, but private school tuition is about 12,000 for the early years and 25,000 for the later years. Anyone with a heartbeat could earn more than that at a job. Women have been pushing homeschooling so they don't have to work in the real world.
THIS!!!!!!!

If you don't want to send your kid to public school, find a private school with a decent amount of students and something approaching a normal school experience. Homeschooling can be done right I suppose, but the fact is that most Christian parents who do it are overprotective and damage their kids.

I give part of my tithe to the high school football program at the ecumenical Christian school in my town. If you don't have kids, I'd suggest people here look into helping fund these types of schools.

Potential challenges:
- The main reason I've heard people say they wouldn't homeschool is socialization. If you're in a major city, there's probably a homeschool group you can join for fieldtrips and sports, etc. If that's not an option, there are still other ways for you child to make friends besides 40 hours a week at a government indoctrination center.
Organized activities supervised by neurotic home school moms do not replace the experience of an organic playground hierarchy in elementary and middle school. If someone is going to home school their kids, I suggest they embrace free range parenting regarding the kids social development.
 
Homeschooling can be done right I suppose, but the fact is that most Christian parents who do it are overprotective and damage their kids.
Out of all the homeschooled kids I know -and by the time I graduated highschool there were several hundred families in our homeschool group - only a handful were super sheltered. I think the sheltered homeschooled kid stereotype exists for the same reason people who grew up athiest imagine that Christians are all angry people who shout on street corners that everyone is going to hell - you judge the group by the members who stand out.
But my data set is limited to about five hundred families in a single city, so if you have more experience you might know better.

Organized activities supervised by neurotic home school moms do not replace the experience of an organic playground hierarchy in elementary and middle school.
Correct. Also, organized activities supervised by neurotic school teachers do not replace the experience of an organic playground hierarchy in elementary and middle school. The organic playground hierarchy happens anytime kids play together with limited interference from adults, whether they homeschool or go away to school.

My experience being homeschooled would've been a lot worse without the group. We had park days every Friday afternoon where the parents pretty much left us to our own devices, and more organized field trips to the fire station or civil war battlefields. Then in highschool, there were dances, canoe trips, all that stuff. Most of what we did was pretty free range; a bunch of Christian parents with 5-15 kids can't realistically keep a close eye on all of them.
 
Out of all the homeschooled kids I know -and by the time I graduated highschool there were several hundred families in our homeschool group - only a handful were super sheltered. I think the sheltered homeschooled kid stereotype exists for the same reason people who grew up athiest imagine that Christians are all angry people who shout on street corners that everyone is going to hell - you judge the group by the members who stand out.
But my data set is limited to about five hundred families in a single city, so if you have more experience you might know better.
My experience is more based on small towns in middle America, so there wouldn't have been massive homeschooling groups. My dad is a preacher and there were multiple families in every church he has had who homeschooled. It did not seem like a good experience for the kids compared to public school in small town America.
 

Hypno

Hummingbird
There are a lot of reasons to homeschool. When you join a group or go to a conference, you'll meet lots of people. Very few of them are homeschooling for the reason you are. There are a myriad of reasons why folks homeschool - you will be surprised. Its an easy mistake to assume that other folks have the same goals that you do, even in "Christian" homeschool groups. We met people who were homeschooling because the local public school had too many Mexicans, becuase they had 4 kids and couldn't afford private school, because their kid was "slow"/had a learning disability, etc.

Sociaability is the biggest canard. Invariably, every homeschoooler I have met was better prepared with talking with adults and others than their public school peers. There are a myriad of opportunities for socialization.

The key questions you should ask yourself are what are your goals, and is homeschooling the best way to accomplish them? Often times a good Christian school can accomplish your goals more efficiently.
 

Hell_Is_Like_Newark

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Dad here who kid is going to be home schooled for at least the first few years (to third grade). Reasons:

Both my wife and I had bad experiences in public school. I am apposed to "industrial schooling" which is pretty much public school at a young age. My experience was that if I was born a generation later, I would have been poisoned with ADD meds. Getting a young boy to sit at a desk all day is cruel and counterproductive.

The public schools around here (urban area) are not that good. They are safe, but being public, they have to cater to the lowest common denominator. This issue became more pronounced after the 'No Child Left Behind Act' and the adoption of 'Common Core' (Common Core in my opinion is an abomination). I lose tenants to the suburbs because their kids are ready for fractions, division, multiplication, but the class is still, "repeat after me.. 1+1=2, 2+2=4). My tenant's kids go mad with boredom.

We have charter school options, but you have to get in by lottery (a lottery weighted by race). One of the best schools typically has 1,000+ applicants for less than forty openings. This particular charter school is under assault because in the process of maintaining academic standards, the desired racial makeup wasn't achieved (kids would drop out). So the standards are now being changed as racial justice >> academic progress. The state of NJ has also blocked all new charter schools as the current administration received major support from the teacher's union.

With gentrification came a good number of private schools that were created to service the parents who desire a better education for their children and the means to pay for it. However, when you add up regular tuition, after school activities (both by wife and I wouldn't be available to pick up or kid well after 5 pm), early drop off (have to be at work well be before 9), and summer school (mom & dad don't get the summer off), you are talking $30k+ a year. My wife would be working solely to pay for school!

When my wife agreed to stay home and teach, it fixed that financial boat anchor that my salary alone would struggle to lift. We are investing a few grand in setting up a dedicated classroom (Montessori style), which is a hell of a lot less than paying for private tuition. We are planning on having at least one more kid. Paying for private school for multiple kids would eat up more than 1/2 my after-tax take home pay.

So far I have been very happy with my son's progress in developing, spatial, verbal, and basic math skills (he hasn't turned three yet). My wife is doing a yeoman's job of setting up his 'learning time'.

As for socialization... as another poster pointed out, it an anti-home school canard. My kid meets his 'gang' of friends almost daily (Exception: WuFlu park shutdown). Home schooling allows for more flexibility for him to meet friends and play. How much "socialization" is there when kids are glued to a desk?
 
Invariably, every homeschoooler I have met was better prepared with talking with adults and others than their public school peers. There are a myriad of opportunities for socialization.
Nerd alert!!!! :D

Do you really want to be the type of middle schooler that popular with 40 year olds? Sounds terrible. You are 100% right though. The kids I knew were more comfortable and popular with adults than with their peers.
 

Hypno

Hummingbird
Charter schools - a lot of these are no better than public schools, many are worse. They end up just being publicly funded schools under local control, and about half are managed worse than the public schools. Some are better, sure, but don't make the mistake of assuming they all are.

Homeschool/private school. One thing homeschooling did is it made us take responsibility for our child's education. We were no longer outsourcing it. As a result, everything became an educational opportunity. Going up the stairs was a lesson in counting or identifying colors. I can remember taking my son to Home Depot when he was 2 and I asked him to look for things that were the color orange - man, he was so happy that he found so many ;). (If you are not from the U.S., Home Depot is a store that uses the color orange liberally). Going to the supermarket was a lesson in math. Playing sports was an opportunity to serve, either by setting up the field before matches, helping to close down, or volunteering as a referee. Going on vacataion was a lesson in georgraphy, cultures, nutrition, map reading. Looking back, all of these things were very valuable to my son but the reality is that we could have done them as an adjunct to regular school. You don't need to abandon regular school to take responsibility for your childrens's education.
 
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