Homeschooling

GottMitUns

Chicken
It really depends on how it's done. I was homeschooled K-12 and I have seen it all; the man-boy who never left his parents' home, the virginal bride, the 16 year old who got knocked up, the college carousel riders who rejected the way of their fathers, the crazy liberal feminists, the technological savants with no social skills, and the nerd that went to a military academy. It's true that there's a lot more room for parental influence, but I would argue that the most successful examples of it that I've seen either did public high school or put their kids into unsupervised/lightly supervised situations with their peers. Of the ones that succeeded without either of the aforementioned challenges, the vast majority joined the military and got their lives sorted out that way.
The parents are another thing. I was homeschooled because the school system in my area was complete trash, but a lot of the families I saw were more about the control over their kids. Some did alright and allowed their kids to grow, others smothered them and it showed. Like most things, it really depends on the motivations involved.
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
The North Carolina government websites crashed when it became overloaded with submissions related to Homeschooling.



edchoice-share-2020.png


If our K–12 education system is innovating and finding ways to better serve students and their families, then—as years pass—we would expect the numbers below to begin looking more and more like the chart above.

On a national level:
0.9 percent of students are utilizing an educational choice program
7.6 percent attend private school by other means
83.6 percent attend a public district school
5.3 percent attend a charter school, and
2.6 percent are homeschooled.

 

kel

Ostrich
Can anyone comment on what some of these "notices of intent to establish a home school" involve in different states? How much run around is there in, say, Texas versus New York?
 

kel

Ostrich
North Carolina reports twice the percentage of home school share as the number two. A difference that huge makes me think there must be some difference in accounting, but still, that's another plus for North Carolina as far as my work figuring out where to move and establish my farmstead.
 
What Matianus said.

Homeschooling has merit but its not cost effective. Its popular because a lot of women want to stay home rather than return to work. That sounds like the right thing to do, but private school tuition is about 12,000 for the early years and 25,000 for the later years. Anyone with a heartbeat could earn more than that at a job. Women have been pushing homeschooling so they don't have to work in the real world.

Anyone with a heartbeat could earn more than that at a job? And still have much money left after taxes and other living expenses? Um, I'd like to know which job that is and how easy it is to get. Homeschooling sounds way cheaper than a private school, especially if you have multiple kids.
 

Hypno

Crow
I didn't say someone could do this as a single parent, there are almost no single parent homeschoolers. I said its not cost effective relative to the alternatives.

The best private school in Atlanta charges $30K for the upper grades, less for elementary school. If you live in a smaller city, its likely less.

You would probably need 40K in earnings to have 30K for tuition. 40K is 800 a week, or 20 an hour if you only work 40 hours.

There are people who cut lawns and wait on tables who make that. A teenage babysitter in Atlanta makes about $15 an hour, and adult nanny more like $25 an hour.

So if you are are someones' wife, you could be a nanny and make 50K+ under the table and put your kid in private school at 30K, and come out 20K ahead. If you have a college degreee or some initiative, you would be even further ahead.

Also, homeschooling is not free. There are conferences, field trips, books and curricula, sports leagues, etc. Those expenses are included in the $30K private school tuition.
 
Can anyone comment on what some of these "notices of intent to establish a home school" involve in different states? How much run around is there in, say, Texas versus New York?

Can not speak for New York, but in Texas if kids are already enrolled then you send a letter saying that you are withdrawing the kids. Not asking, but informing them of the fact. If you move in from out of state, then you just start home schooling.


Suggestions for anyone thinking about it:
  • Use a formal curriculum. We use Seton (Catholic). Not expensive, but they grade some tests and essays and keep things honest. They do give diplomas from their private school in Virginia, if that matters. It is a challenging curriculum: diagram sentences, learn real history (none of this PC crap), learn the Bible, read good literature, write essays and reports, learn foreign languages, write in cursive, and do real math. The biology book my daughter is using is more advanced then what I had in advanced biology in public school.
  • Stay away from anything Common Core--trying to teach math that way is child abuse. This was one of our biggest reasons for home schooling. I do some math in my profession and I absolutely hate Common Core math. For up to Algebra I, the Saxon series is OK. For Algebra I on go with something else.
  • We put our last kid in a private school for pre-K and Kindergarten and do not regret it. At that age, is it is fine to have the experience of the first day of school, playing in groups, etc.
  • Get them into 4-H or some other sort of association where kids can find things they are interested in doing as a group. It is not just about raising rabbits anymore, they have groups that compete in robotics, do team cooking competitions, marksmanship, etc. They work with, and get to know, other kids in this way.
People have brought up socialization. Our kids have good friends, have sleep overs, play sports, go to dances, etc.

I personally know one mom who started homeschooling her daughter last year after discovering that the daughter was contemplating suicide due to incessant bullying at school. She had lived there her whole life--she was not the new kid. And by the way, a girl at that same school did commit suicide due to bullying eight years before--hanged herself in a barn just before school was due to resume because she could not bear the thought of another year of socialization. That was in a town of 5,000.

Someone sees one awkward home schooled kid and question the whole concept. But when Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold, or Nikolas Cruz murder their class mates in cold blood, does anyone question what is going on in those centers of socialization to produce such a product? People call them factory schools, point taken, but that is not fair to factories. I have worked in several factories and if any one of them had such a high defect rate, a VP from the home office would have shown up, fired several people, and then given an ultimatum to those left to get their act straight or face a plant closure.
 

JohnQThomas

Woodpecker
To me the ideal "homeschool" is a few women in a community teaching all the kids in that community. Basically the "one room schoolhouse" model. It becomes a lot more financially efficient that way, though looking at this as a purely financial transaction is kinda vulgar, and in a just world the homeschoolers would be able to get the money (or at least some fraction of it) that institutional schools get on a per-student basis.
It would be great if some fathers taught too. Boys aren’t exposed to many male teachers.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I personally know one mom who started homeschooling her daughter last year after discovering that the daughter was contemplating suicide due to incessant bullying at school. She had lived there her whole life--she was not the new kid. And by the way, a girl at that same school did commit suicide due to bullying eight years before--hanged herself in a barn just before school was due to resume because she could not bear the thought of another year of socialization. That was in a town of 5,000.

Someone sees one awkward home schooled kid and question the whole concept. But when Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold, or Nikolas Cruz murder their class mates in cold blood, does anyone question what is going on in those centers of socialization to produce such a product? People call them factory schools, point taken, but that is not fair to factories. I have worked in several factories and if any one of them had such a high defect rate, a VP from the home office would have shown up, fired several people, and then given an ultimatum to those left to get their act straight or face a plant closure.
Fantastic point. I know a handful of parents who are pulling their kids from public school for the same reason. This might've been an issue 50-60 years ago, but there's no way it was as bad as it is now. I went to a very multi-cultural high school and it was a nightmare. So many different groups of people, forced into the same building everyday. Combine that with teenage angst and it's no wonder suicides are on the rise.
 
Not sure of your point, but children are a blessing and not something you can presume. Especially these days with women waiting to get married and start a family, infertility and still births are on the rise.

My point is homeschooling gets better(well, private schooling gets worse) the more children you have. Once you have three it becomes unquestionably cheaper than private schools.
 

bucky

Ostrich
So...their school basically taught them social justice and activism instead of history. What a great idea to turn them into useful idiots for protests and riots.


The fat one is probably a fake, paper American. Not knowing which year the Declaration of Independence was signed is typical of fake Americans, that is, people who have US citizenship and may have even been born here but have no connection to or interest in our history or culture. I remember reading something by a heritage American who teaches in San Antonio who said that it's true in a sense that his Hispanic students assimilate to the culture. It's just that they can, for example, tell you the origins of all the Marvel superheroes, whereas they have only the vaguest idea of who people like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin were.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Kingfisher
Gold Member
The fat one is probably a fake, paper American. Not knowing which year the Declaration of Independence was signed is typical of fake Americans, that is, people who have US citizenship and may have even been born here but have no connection to or interest in our history or culture. I remember reading something by a heritage American who teaches in San Antonio who said that it's true in a sense that his Hispanic students assimilate to the culture. It's just that they can, for example, tell you the origins of all the Marvel superheroes, whereas they have only the vaguest idea of who people like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin were.

Dunno that they're much different from most of their white classmates in that regard.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
A story a friend told me.

When he was 15 years old, he used to play on a Soccer team that was about 50% Jewish kids and had a Jewish Soccer coach. The coach would drive them all around in the stereotypical Toyota Tarago mini-van. One day, on the way home from practice, coach had to drop by something off at the local Jewish private school, which was running some kind of summer school program (additional schooling over and above the government curriculum).

As my friend waited, he read a noticeboard at the school. It had a list of the subjects that these 16 and 17 year olds were learning (Years 11 and 12 here in Australia, the last 2 years of high school before University (College)). The subjects were Business Law, Accounting, Financial Reporting, Presentation Skills, those types of things. So while most kids are learning useless Quadratic Equations in Year 11 Maths, these kids were learning actually useful stuff for the business world. Good on them, makes so much sense. This is what my kids will be learning too. How to start a business, things like that.
 
Redbeard wrote:
"Fantastic point. I know a handful of parents who are pulling their kids from public school for the same reason. This might've been an issue 50-60 years ago, but there's no way it was as bad as it is now. I went to a very multi-cultural high school and it was a nightmare. So many different groups of people, forced into the same building everyday. Combine that with teenage angst and it's no wonder suicides are on the rise."

Years ago, I had a part time job I would do in the evening for a little extra coin, helping a buddy repair huge wide screen televisions. He sometimes needed an extra set of hands, and I discovered that the job was never the same, depending on where we went. The two of us repaired televisions in prisons, strip joints, multi-million dollar mansions, you name it! But the call we went on, that I recall the best, was to a local Jewish private elementary school. I could not get over how nice the facility was, the quality of the teachers and the sense of family/community. The place was not cheap, but they had a big poster about raising more funds, so a couple dozen poor Jewish kids could attend the school, despite their lack of parental funds. I looked over the bulletin board, which showed the many class trips taken, school parties enjoyed, and how active the parents were with their children's educations. The kids just seemed gentler and more civilized than what I am used to seeing at the public elementary school level. It was definitely stepping into another world.
 

JohnQThomas

Woodpecker
Redbeard wrote:
"Fantastic point. I know a handful of parents who are pulling their kids from public school for the same reason. This might've been an issue 50-60 years ago, but there's no way it was as bad as it is now. I went to a very multi-cultural high school and it was a nightmare. So many different groups of people, forced into the same building everyday. Combine that with teenage angst and it's no wonder suicides are on the rise."

Years ago, I had a part time job I would do in the evening for a little extra coin, helping a buddy repair huge wide screen televisions. He sometimes needed an extra set of hands, and I discovered that the job was never the same, depending on where we went. The two of us repaired televisions in prisons, strip joints, multi-million dollar mansions, you name it! But the call we went on, that I recall the best, was to a local Jewish private elementary school. I could not get over how nice the facility was, the quality of the teachers and the sense of family/community. The place was not cheap, but they had a big poster about raising more funds, so a couple dozen poor Jewish kids could attend the school, despite their lack of parental funds. I looked over the bulletin board, which showed the many class trips taken, school parties enjoyed, and how active the parents were with their children's educations. The kids just seemed gentler and more civilized than what I am used to seeing at the public elementary school level. It was definitely stepping into another world.
Jewish private schools for the win, then? What about Catholic schools?
 
Jewish private schools for the win, then? What about Catholic schools?

I will just say that to keep the Jewish private school running so well, it took the combination of a close-knit common culture, well paid teachers, parents who were very involved with their kids and responsibly pushed them, and lots of money to keep things chugging along. It could certainly be replicated by a Christian community, with similar characteristics and goals.
 

Hypno

Crow
Can anyone comment on what some of these "notices of intent to establish a home school" involve in different states? How much run around is there in, say, Texas versus New York?

In most states this is fairly perfunctory. Check out HSLDA - they might have some advice. Also, find a local homeschool support group in your area, someone there will know. In my state, it was a simple 1-page form that you had to file annually by a deadline, but other than that it was inconsequential.
 
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