Homeschooling

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
I spoke with my mechanic yesterday. He's got 10 kids, all homeschooled.

He mentioned the keys were :
(1) Starting them early (They get them into alphabet at 3, reading at 4)
(2) Teaching them to follow directions for assignments on their own. He said that children in the system can't just read directions and begin working on anything. The reason this is key is when you have kids going on different assignments based on their age, you can only help one at a time.

Good guy.
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I should probably caveat this post with a disclaimer: I work for an educational publisher.

I was there when common core was developed, especially the math. I tried to learn it and honestly fell in love with it. Why? Because I'm quite literally a math retard and this style of mathematical education is tailored for retards like me.

CC math is designed to teach the short cuts that naturally gifted math teachers and students already intuitively pick up. I never picked this up and math was always a rote exercise and something that would have required 3x the amount of time in school for me to master. Since it all builds on one another, I basically have a giant pyramid of swiss cheese for higher level mathematics. I had multitudes of personal tutoring and I sadly never "got it". I did get really good at frustrating my tutors and teachers by asking them how they derived answers when they would skip stuff in an effort to speed up the calculations. Nope, I want everything listed out. Don't ASSume anything.

I muddled through all of my math classes barely ekking out high C's and low B's. A shame because I really enjoyed my science and computer science classes which all require high level mathematics.

The problem with CC math is shite teachers who miss the point and then try and attack it like old school math instructions. The naturally gifted mathematics kids then get confused, go to their parents who are also confused, and hate that their kids get downgraded for the, "right answer" when they're getting graded on the process.

It's a sort of sad irony that math retards like myself get a boost at the expense of the naturally gifted.

The goal was to put kids in the west on the same footing as kids in Asia by teaching them how to be mental math calculators.

Unfortunately, as TPTB on curriculum development have finally admitted: teachers and the one size fits all educational process are to blame for the disaster that is western education.

There's been a large push from above to develop curriculum that's entirely home based and either taught by a remote teacher or a parent. Every stage and every assignment is considered important. If you don't understand something , you cannot progress until you master it.

Understandably, I like this. It prevents students from, "waiting out" something's that confuses them. Something that is deadly in math education.

Regardless, I will be homeschooling eventually send my kids to a proper high school once they pass through their formative years.
 

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
My 3 yr old is in a private, Christian pre-K but I'm already seeing some of the potential issues.

One one hand, I do think the socialization has helped him. He's a delayed talker and has issues with pronunciation but he's become incredibly more verbal since Sept.

However, despite being behind in some areas, analytically he's far ahead of his peers in others.

He knows three alphabets, English, Bulgarian and Russian. My wife and I don't even know how he knows the Russian alphabet. He can write the English alphabet backwards in two mins. I can't do that. He literally can write it backwards at the same pace he writes it forwards. He knows all 50 states on the map. He can mostly arrange the states for the country like a puzzle without reference. While his class in on letter G of the alphabet, doing one letter per week, he's writing words. He's beginning to understand addition. 2+5. 4+4. 6+3. He draws pictures of family, houses, nature, etc, while his peers still can't really formulate anything. At the playground while all other kids are just running around goofing off, he takes his chalk and writes out 1-100 on the ground.

He knows stuff his 6/7 yr old cousins don't. I'm not exaggerating when I say his 7 yr old cousin can't point out Florida on a map and my 3 yr old can arrange the entire eastern sea border plus point to Brazil, Russia, India, China, etc.

So I'm not sure where we go. It's either private schools or homeschooling. What complicates the latter is my wife is completely unfamiliar with what is taught in the US and spent much of her youth in a communist sports academy.

But I struggled mightily in the American school system and see a lot of myself in my son.

I find it concerning from the school's perspective that my son is already doing stuff they won't cover until 2-3 years from now. By then he'll be writing full sentences. Actually he's already stringing together multiple written words so it might be a matter of months from now.

The gay stuff is a concern down the road but I'm beginning to think my son may have a gift and the American school structure won't be the best for him. And I'm not exactly sure how to handle it.
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
Went to the Divine Liturgy today and met a very nice man that attends a different parish but loves the priest at my parish, so he comes occasionally.

Almost every child at his parish is homeschooled and they work as a group to teach the children. There is an Orthodox school in my city where the kids attend a couple of days per week, so they can strengthen their faith and social skills. He mentioned so many families that have moved to our city from the Chicago area due to the public schools being lost. And these are families from the affluent suburbs of Chitown.

I was all in after hearing about this opportunity for my son, even though he's only 10 months old.

There is a highly reputable mma gym very near me that has classes for boys beginning at 3 years old.

He'll get plenty of social interactions.

Homeschooling is the ONLY option.
 
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Graft

Kingfisher
Protestant
Gold Member
I think homeschooling is the dumbest thing a parent can do.

I believe that these "liberal public schools are brainwashing my kids" crowds are grossly overestimating the effect that some teacher has on a young child's mind. Most grade schoolers are worried about spitballs and passing "I like you, like you" notes. By time middle school and high school comes around, people care about being popular, playing sports, prom dates, etc.

When you homeschool your child, you rob them of irreplaceable life experiences: HS sports, theatre clubs, proms, parties, lifelong friends. All for what. Fear that your 15 year old actually takes their teacher's worldview seriously?

I hardly remember my teachers 15 years later. I certainly never cared about or analyzed their worldview. But I was incredibly bitter that I didn't have a normal school experience.
 

Parmesan

Kingfisher
Other Christian
A story a friend told me.

When he was 15 years old, he used to play on a Soccer team that was about 50% Jewish kids and had a Jewish Soccer coach. The coach would drive them all around in the stereotypical Toyota Tarago mini-van. One day, on the way home from practice, coach had to drop by something off at the local Jewish private school, which was running some kind of summer school program (additional schooling over and above the government curriculum).

As my friend waited, he read a noticeboard at the school. It had a list of the subjects that these 16 and 17 year olds were learning (Years 11 and 12 here in Australia, the last 2 years of high school before University (College)). The subjects were Business Law, Accounting, Financial Reporting, Presentation Skills, those types of things. So while most kids are learning useless Quadratic Equations in Year 11 Maths, these kids were learning actually useful stuff for the business world. Good on them, makes so much sense. This is what my kids will be learning too. How to start a business, things like that.
I think kids would honestly be better served by not going to high school at all. Let them get a job and start figuring out the world. If they truly want to learn they don’t need the school anyway. That’s 4 years of life experience and 4 years you could be directing yourself to be some sort of subject matter expert or a tradesman. By 18 you will be alot better positioned than someone that’s just been babied by their parents and sitting bored at a desk for 4 years.
 

lonetraveler

Pigeon
Other Christian
I think homeschooling is the dumbest thing a parent can do.

I believe that these "liberal public schools are brainwashing my kids" crowds are grossly overestimating the effect that some teacher has on a young child's mind. Most grade schoolers are worried about spitballs and passing "I like you, like you" notes. By time middle school and high school comes around, people care about being popular, playing sports, prom dates, etc.

When you homeschool your child, you rob them of irreplaceable life experiences: HS sports, theatre clubs, proms, parties, lifelong friends. All for what. Fear that your 15 year old actually takes their teacher's worldview seriously?

I hardly remember my teachers 15 years later. I certainly never cared about or analyzed their worldview. But I was incredibly bitter that I didn't have a normal school experience.
Yeah, I bet none of these people were actually homeschooled which is why they naively think it's so great. Also making them work instead of going to high school and spending time with friends is just going to make them resent you someday. As a parent what you think is a "benefit" of homeschooling does not have an ounce of value to a kid/teen. I get it though, I'd probably be saying the same stuff if I never had experienced this stuff.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Pelican
Catholic
Gold Member
I think homeschooling is the dumbest thing a parent can do.

I believe that these "liberal public schools are brainwashing my kids" crowds are grossly overestimating the effect that some teacher has on a young child's mind. Most grade schoolers are worried about spitballs and passing "I like you, like you" notes. By time middle school and high school comes around, people care about being popular, playing sports, prom dates, etc.

When you homeschool your child, you rob them of irreplaceable life experiences: HS sports, theatre clubs, proms, parties, lifelong friends. All for what. Fear that your 15 year old actually takes their teacher's worldview seriously?

I hardly remember my teachers 15 years later. I certainly never cared about or analyzed their worldview. But I was incredibly bitter that I didn't have a normal school experience.

...so were you homeschooled? The first 2 sentences of your final paragraph imply that you weren't, and the final one implies that you were.
 

Tradcatholic

Robin
Catholic
Homeschooling is allowed in Austria, but not in Germany.

A family with young children (before the age of 6) should consider to move to Austria, since socialism is an intrinsic part of eduacation (kintergarten and schhol) as well as politics and media.
The idea of moving to Austria has aged badly since May 2020 (no offense to poster!).
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
A surprising amount of people really think throwing your children to the coming wave of LGBT/BIPOC, atheist, zoomer/millennial schoolteachers is better than teaching them yourselves and instilling in them Godly virtues. This is even after schools across the country have been turned into concentration camps for kids complete with inhumane mask wearing and social isolation. I refuse to take the opinions of these people seriously; the judgment of these people is completely out of whack.
 

NotaBene

Pigeon
Protestant
Been homeschooling daughter 5-11. Going well. I'm the principal, wifey is the teacher. School takes less than four hours a day.

The main deficiency people *assume* homeschoolers have is socialization. To that I have a few points:

- Yes you have to try a bit harder, join a church with some kids and make friends, join a co-op in your area, start a "games group".
- Because of this YOU get to pick your kid's friends, especially when they are young. This is huge. Bad company corrupts good character. Get your kids together with friends YOU want them to be like. Easy to steer them.
- Public schools segregate by age. This can actually be detrimental. Sure, they see more kids their own age but have little experience with adults and kids of all ages. Homeschool can easily be better at socializing kids with other people of all ages, even old people.
- There are lots of lonely and unsocialized kids in the public schools no one cares about. I was one. Don't assume that because kids are in a place with other kids they are automatically "better socialized". In fact all the homeschool kids I've known are far more respectful, polite, and can actually hold a conversation with an adult.

That aside, homeschooling is a huge blessing because you, as the head of the household, get to choose what you think is important for your child to know. Don't assume that is the same curriculum as the public schools. My daughter will likely never get past algebra, because who cares? I never use above that in real life, so why the heck would she need to learn it?

The end result of homeschool is that the child becomes like his parents. I want my daughter to be just like her mother - able to manage a home well, a good wife, mother, and Christian. Therefore we direct all our teaching and curriculum choices to that end. My daughter learning things like how to cook for her family someday, how to be wise with money, to understand the Bible, to be a submissive wife - these are FAR more important than if she knows US history or the pythagorean theorem.

In our church community (it's mostly brazilians, a sort of cultural bubble) about 90% of families homeschool. Guess how much anxiety, depression, ADHD we have among children? Undisciplined, disrespectful kids? None of the above.
 
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Revolting Truth

 
Banned
Orthodox
Been homeschooling daughter 5-11. Going well. I'm the principal, wifey is the teacher. School takes less than four hours a day.

The main deficiency people *assume* homeschoolers have is socialization. To that I have a few points:

- Yes you have to try a bit harder, join a church with some kids and make friends, join a co-op in your area, start a "games group".
- Because of this YOU get to pick your kid's friends, especially when they are young. This is huge. Bad company corrupts good character. Get your kids together with friends YOU want them to be like. Easy to steer them.
- Public schools segregate by age. This can actually be detrimental. Sure, they see more kids their own age but have little experience with adults and kids of all ages. Homeschool can easily be better at socializing kids with other people of all ages, even old people.
- There are lots of lonely and unsocialized kids in the public schools no one cares about. I was one. Don't assume that because kids are in a place with other kids they are automatically "better socialized". In fact all the homeschool kids I've known are far more respectful, polite, and can actually hold a conversation with an adult.

That aside, homeschooling is a huge blessing because you, as the head of the household, get to choose what you think is important for your child to know. Don't assume that is the same curriculum as the public schools. My daughter will likely never get past algebra, because who cares? I never use above that in real life, so why the heck would she need to learn it?

The end result of homeschool is that the child becomes like his parents. I want my daughter to be just like her mother - able to manage a home well, a good wife, mother, and Christian. Therefore we direct all our teaching and curriculum choices to that end. My daughter learning things like how to cook for her family someday, how to be wise with money, to understand the Bible, to be a submissive wife - these are FAR more important than if she knows US history or the pythagorean theorem.

In our church community (it's mostly brazilians, a sort of cultural bubble) about 90% of families homeschool. Guess how much anxiety, depression, ADHD we have among children? Undisciplined, disrespectful kids? None of the above.
"There are lots of lonely and unsocialized kids in the public schools no one cares about. I was one. Don't assume that because kids are in a place with other kids they are automatically "better socialized". In fact all the homeschool kids I've known are far more respectful, polite, and can actually hold a conversation with an adult."

100% true. Large percentage of children who end up in schools are traumatized...and end up struggling as adults with mental illness, substance abuse...and generally unhappy adult life.
While most kids who were home-schooled tend to be confident, happy and sane...and end up becoming healthy, sane and successful adults.
It is also a big misconception that children can only socialize in school. If you choose to homeschool your kids, you can choose who they would socialize with - you can do the vetting process and keep your children safe. It's a win-win for both your children and you as a parent.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Hummingbird
Orthodox Inquirer
Been homeschooling daughter 5-11. Going well. I'm the principal, wifey is the teacher. School takes less than four hours a day.

The main deficiency people *assume* homeschoolers have is socialization. To that I have a few points:

- Yes you have to try a bit harder, join a church with some kids and make friends, join a co-op in your area, start a "games group".
- Because of this YOU get to pick your kid's friends, especially when they are young. This is huge. Bad company corrupts good character. Get your kids together with friends YOU want them to be like. Easy to steer them.
- Public schools segregate by age. This can actually be detrimental. Sure, they see more kids their own age but have little experience with adults and kids of all ages. Homeschool can easily be better at socializing kids with other people of all ages, even old people.
- There are lots of lonely and unsocialized kids in the public schools no one cares about. I was one. Don't assume that because kids are in a place with other kids they are automatically "better socialized". In fact all the homeschool kids I've known are far more respectful, polite, and can actually hold a conversation with an adult.

That aside, homeschooling is a huge blessing because you, as the head of the household, get to choose what you think is important for your child to know. Don't assume that is the same curriculum as the public schools. My daughter will likely never get past algebra, because who cares? I never use above that in real life, so why the heck would she need to learn it?

The end result of homeschool is that the child becomes like his parents. I want my daughter to be just like her mother - able to manage a home well, a good wife, mother, and Christian. Therefore we direct all our teaching and curriculum choices to that end. My daughter learning things like how to cook for her family someday, how to be wise with money, to understand the Bible, to be a submissive wife - these are FAR more important than if she knows US history or the pythagorean theorem.

In our church community (it's mostly brazilians, a sort of cultural bubble) about 90% of families homeschool. Guess how much anxiety, depression, ADHD we have among children? Undisciplined, disrespectful kids? None of the above.
Interesting perspective, thanks for sharing. As I get older and understand the truth and reality better, it appears to me more and more that the more modern education you get the further you get away from truth and reality. It mainly is a lot of confusion, to get you focused on any nonsense possible except on Christ, tradition and values like marriage, family, doing good for others. If you see how much people invest in modern education and things like career and ''personal development'' it's crazy to see, if you realize in the end none of that will matter and they will have invested nothing the things that matter. That's a tragedy.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
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Survey from 2004-5. Imagine what the list would be now.
 

Parmesan

Kingfisher
Other Christian
Schools are a net negative, even many private schools. For one, the kids that excel in school and participate in extra activities are typically bright and/or have supportive families that would help them excel in any situation, traditional schooling or otherwise.

If you are low self esteem, socially awkward, etc. your problems and failures will likely only be made worse in school, it’s likely you will pick up negative experiences that will be detrimental to your growth and possibly make your issues worse. Kids with these type of issues should be on a different path entirely that addresses and fixes their weaknesses rather than exploits them, which the social atmosphere of school typically does.

If you are just an average or lower type of kid, the negative influences of the lowest common denominator will probably be a net negative. Your kids are exposed to all kinds of negative influences at school, especially these days, when not only will their peers be pushing the usual things like drugs, sex, alcohol, etc. but the faculty will be suspect themselves in terms of gay/trans/BLM propaganda and pedophilia. Not that kids won’t face these challenges elsewhere, but there are certainly better ways than the current. Low IQ and troublesome students should have tailored paths to address their shortcoming, probably a sctrict, militaristic type of system.
 

Helmsman

Sparrow
Protestant
I think homeschooling is the dumbest thing a parent can do.

I believe that these "liberal public schools are brainwashing my kids" crowds are grossly overestimating the effect that some teacher has on a young child's mind. Most grade schoolers are worried about spitballs and passing "I like you, like you" notes. By time middle school and high school comes around, people care about being popular, playing sports, prom dates, etc.

When you homeschool your child, you rob them of irreplaceable life experiences: HS sports, theatre clubs, proms, parties, lifelong friends. All for what. Fear that your 15 year old actually takes their teacher's worldview seriously?

I hardly remember my teachers 15 years later. I certainly never cared about or analyzed their worldview. But I was incredibly bitter that I didn't have a normal school experience.
I'm in my mid 20s, and was homeschooled K-12. At times I've been very angry with how my parents went about it in terms of socialization. There were a number of different factors, but the one that really ticked me off was being prohibited from dating. Had to "court" but never was around women to learn how to interact with them beyond normal conversation (game, for lack of a better word). It didn't help things that my Dad was incapable of staying at a church for more than 6 months before getting sideways with the pastor so we bounced around a lot and never became part of a church community. Plus my Mom tried to shelter me through HS due to some health problems that I was working through. Kind of a perfect storm. Been a learning curve over the past few years. Definitely saw things I will improve on.

But at this point in society public schooling is the absolute worst thing you could to your children. Maybe it was different in your day. But there is so much moral rot in the student body that parents never really see it's astounding. Even in small towns and with good teachers. Add in masks screwing with kids' psychology, vaccine mandates, CRT, and poor modern curriculums. It's insanity. Where I grew up we participated in a co-op where various mothers with degrees in applicable fields taught classes on English, foreign languages, and science. Like a fusion of homeschooling and private school. Met 2-3 times a week, lots of parental involvement, and a lot of homework. There were sports teams that competed against other religious schools. We even had a prom/formal (the elderly female chaperones were intense) and a graduation ceremony. If you live in an area with a lot of homeschoolers chances are good that there are plenty of ways to socialize your kids.

The key, I believe, is not to bar the door and shut your kids in. Kick em out and make em play sports, go hunting, hiking, and camping. Teach em to lift. Let them date/court whatever you want to call it with appropriate restrictions so mistakes aren't made and sins committed. Make good men and women of them. And also let them see the world in a controlled fashion so when they go out they know what to expect and why not to make those choices. It's a cliche in college to be exposed to a variety of new temptations and to fall into their trap since they're new and you don't know how to handle them. Be it drugs, sex, or Marxist philosophy. In public school, you cannot control your kids' exposure to the evils of the world, but in homeschooling, you can.
 
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NotaBene

Pigeon
Protestant
Had to "court" but never was around women to learn how to interact with them beyond normal conversation

At public school you "interact" with a lot of girls, but if you're that invisible 80% you don't really learn much beyond that. They will use you as a friend zone for "advice" and "emotional support" but that's it. Even if a girl had shown interest (and looking back several did), I was too ignorant to know what to do with that.

That said this is a continuum - you don't actually need much knowledge or experience to get married. I got married at 20 and had never seen a woman naked, had sex, or even dated seriously other than my wife. She was much the same, had never even kissed a guy. I have to tell you, it was the total ignorance of everything that was the greatest blessing to us. You cannot go back once you obtain all that knowledge. This is why marrying a virgin, and preferably a girl who has never even dated a guy, is the best thing.

That's why I'm a bit protective of my daughter, I want her to have that same experience of marrying young and knowing nothing about men other than what her duties are in marriage.

 
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