How to Answer “Why Are You Applying for This Position?”

Rockym

Pigeon
I am applying for manual labour jobs , house keeper jobs , front desk jobs and during interview they ask questions like , why are you applying for this position ?

You are over qualified .
You are 40 years old .
You were earning much higher salary , you should try for similar jobs .

How to answer these interview questions ?
I can't tell them that I am not interested in white collar jobs anymore .

Thanks
 
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jarlo

Robin
They are concerned that you will leave the job once you find a higher paying office position, and then they'll have to search for someone once again.

It's not clear from your post why you're excluding all white collar work, but one option for you is just to lie about your experience on your resume and put a friend as a contact for your false previous blue collar job. Or, you can just say that you had your own business, but you had to shut down due to the pandemic.
 

Rockym

Pigeon
My question is , If they are concerned that I will leave once I find a higher paying office position . Why do they call me for an interview for these blue collar jobs?
 

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
I can't tell them that I am not interested in white collar jobs anymore.

Why not? Actually they may respect someone who isn't afraid to get their hands dirty but also knows enough about 'white collar' to make themselves useful here and there, e.g. fill out a spreadsheet about guest visits, or track inventory.

Whatever you come up with, sound convincing. If necessary make something up. People just want justification for having hired someone over qualified as they may have to report to higher ups.
 

Gradient

Kingfisher
Why not? Actually they may respect someone who isn't afraid to get their hands dirty but also knows enough about 'white collar' to make themselves useful here and there, e.g. fill out a spreadsheet about guest visits, or track inventory.

Exactly.

This also gives you the option of potentially moving back into a white collar position if you find that the blue collar stuff doesn't suit you after a while. I think it is perfectly viable to let them know that you want a broad range of work experience and that right now, this type of work is where you are focusing your efforts.
 

Callixtus

Robin
I just did something similar. I told them that the industry I was in was already somewhat volatile and has essentially been choked in this region due to China virus (which it has) and that I had already been considering a career/lifestyle change over the last year anyway (which I had been.)

I'm three months in, already advanced to a higher position, and with the overtime I'm making as much or more as I used to.
 

kosko

Peacock
Gold Member
I am applying for manual labour jobs, housekeeper jobs, front desk jobs, and asking questions like , why are you applying for this position ?

You are over qualified .
You are 40 years old .
You were earning much higher salary , you should try for similar jobs .

How to answer these interview questions ?
I can't tell them that I am not interested in white collar jobs anymore .

Thanks

If you are applying for basic type jobs, you need to dumb down your resume. When I was in a bind and needed A JOB, I created an alternate bare-bones resume that excluded my professional roles. Many basic jobs don't have robust HR and are not going to fine-tooth your resume. These types of jobs screen to make sure you are not:

A Criminal
Having Anger/Attitude Issues
Won't quit on them in 5 weeks
Competent
Reliable

If the owner/GM is interviewing you and is a guy, it's best to be straight up with him. Tell him you need a change, you're in a bind, need a job, and want to be in an environment where you can do honest, simple and fulfilling work. More often than not, these guys will hire you based on your honesty and the fact you are a good guy. It has worked for me in the past (honest about your situation - your past professional earnings and experience isn't relevant - don't bring it up).

It also helps to narrow your focus on a few industries/job types and doesn't just spray your resume all-over to see what sticks. You narrow it down and just aggressively apply to EACH position that comes up daily.* You'll never get hired as a housekeeper over a militant Filipino or El Savodrean lady who can run laps around you in cleaning a room. You'll never beat those types of candidates that dominate those industries, so be smart about it and don't waste your time on jobs you will never be a fit for.**


If all that does not work, then look for a sales job. Sales are the one industry where you will have people working young and old.

*One tip I can share is that once you narrow down your jobs and industry search, wake-up early each day and fire off resumes to each new posting for that day that appears - you will show up early and at the top of the inbox. I would wake up at 5 am and filter the most recent postings and fire my resume away—no cover letter - ever. Just resume, and I made sure to include my number in the email. I could usually find something in 2-3 weeks doing this aggressively each day.

**Don't apply to jobs where "speed" is required. You will walk into the interview as a 40-year-old they automatically won't consider you as they will think you'll be slow. Lots of these basic jobs grind staff into working "fast" to complete more in less time, and they just rely on youth or dumb dues full energy as a staff base.
 
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Athanasius

Pelican
I'd say something like: "I've tried my hand at white collar work and decided sitting in an office isn't for me, and I want to try something different (or maybe "more hands on") and I'm willing to take a step back to do so. If your father was a blue collar worker then you can tie it to that as well.
 

Caractacus Potts

Woodpecker
Gold Member
I sat on panel interviews all day last week and dealt with a few people with situations similar to yours. The one that stood out to me most was a young man who left a position with IBM to take a much lower paying position in a field that is related to mine. When asked why he left he explained that he was bored at work and hated the whole office routine. He said he would surf the web looking for jobs that people enjoyed and found satisfying- my profession was one that kept coming up. This young guy gave up probably at least 75K per year to work for an outfit that probably pays $18/hour but now loves what he is doing. I scored him highly and he will be invited back for a second round of interviews.

Side anecdote: One of the interviewers on the panel is female. When he left she said he gave her "that douchey, frat-boy vibe." I asked her how much experience she had with douchey frat-boys and she turned red. The other guys on the panel with me laughed.

Second side anecdote: She commented on how hot one of the candidates was and she didn't care if he was as dumb as a box of rocks we should hire him! lol Just imagine if I or one of the other two men on my panel said that.
 
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