How to be exempted from mandatory vaccinations

Papist

Robin
The problem I see, is you can have this carefully crafted lawyer-speak letter that you 'require' your employer to sign, and they will laugh and just fire you. You try to take it to court and the jews there will side with employer. Not trying to see dont try again, but I dont see it being a clear cut victory.
Well, if you are adamant you will not take the vaccine, what have you got to lose? At least make it hard for them.


Scotland today confirmed the introduction of Vaccine Passports. They will begin on 1st October. I am already scheduled to attend a big football (soccer to the Americans) match in October, and I'm guttered. Aye, I know how some of you feel about 'sportsball', but it was something I was looking forward to, and there's not a lot nowadays.

Anyway, I'm considering how I will circumvent the passport.
 

HighTower

Robin
Orthodox
Just to let you all know, my workplace has implemented mandatory jabs.

Also, they have denied all religious/creed exemptions, and most medical exemptions as well.

Ontario's medical regulator, the CPSO, has said that medical exemptions can only be provided for the following reasons:




In other words, in Canada you can only get a medical exemption if you've had a severe reaction to a prior COVID-19 jab.

My friend's workplace makes him sign a long form if he wants a religious exemption -- and then denied him the religious exemption anyway. I looked at the form, and I'm surprised he signed it at all; the form says that the local Public Health department can impose additional restrictions on the unvaccinated in the case of an outbreak.
You have what is call "the right of contract" meaning you do not ever have to sign an opt-out agreement and usually has other binding wording. Your opting out is not signing anything and the opt-out contract is a legal trick.

All you have to do is declare a religious exemption not apply for one so send an email to HR stating:

I, Pro Choice employee, have a deep personal religious belief against the use of vaccinations or other medical devices in my body or the body of my children and will require religious exemption.

Thank you in advance,

Mr. Pro Choice

Do not state what religion or any details or dangers with regards to the vaccine because they can use it against you. Then, hold the line...
 
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darebear

Chicken
A success story. I work for a small corporate employer in the United States. They do not have a mandatory vaccine policy or testing policy just yet, but they do have a mandatory mask policy. You can only remove your mask inside your office or cubicle. Most people comply but I do not believe it is strongly enforced. Regardless, after careful consideration and prayer, I decided to state my position via the religious exemption/accommodation route.

As you have seen throughout this thread, there are various strategies to go about this. One that I like is the "conditional acceptance" where you accept to take a vaccine product if the employer accepts the liability and set a fee schedule for any reactions experienced. Most employers would not sign such a thing and give you the exemption. Since my employer is "at-will" and my employment is not based on a contract, this was not the best route for me. If I presented them with a conditional acceptance, they would probably tell me to pound sand. Plus, this is only a mask mandate. I believe there are risks associated to wearing a mask long term, but based on the stated policy you only have to wear one walking around the office. It's actually pretty low risk.

So I presented them with a request for religious accommodation. This way, if they fired me, I can claim unlawful termination, even in an at-will state with an at-will employer. You can't fire someone for an unlawful reason and I set the table to be able to make that claim.

My initial request was short, simple and cordial. Start small and more information later if you have too. Don't share any more information than you are required too.

Their initial response acknowledged that they assumed the sincerity of my religious belief, but that based on public health data, they could not make any exceptions and would like to schedule a meeting to discuss. The communication was very bad and they left it ambiguous enough to be construed as intimidation and it escalated the situation.

I responded with a stronger letter pointing out the relevant law (including issues of retaliation and intimidation) and that public health recommendations to not supersede the law.

Their next response was substantially the same, but a better communication. It should have been their first response. They still wanted to discuss other accommodation over a video meeting. I accepted to hear what they had to say, but I also said I would only answer questions in writing.

The meeting went well. They recognized that their first communication was less than ideal and wanted to make clear that they did not mean it as intimidation. They offered an accommodation that, to me, seamed reasonable and isn't a discriminatory practice.

I accepted the accommodation in an email after the meeting.

Key takeaways:
  • Only pursue a religious accommodation if you are truly sincere. It is important to remain in truth, even with yourself. This was a great opportunity to grow in resolve in my faith and to God. Make sure you are not pursuing this course of action out of pride and personal preference.
  • Whatever strategy you take, be willing to go the distance. I was willing to lose my job over this. I was willing to report my employer to various enforcement agencies and even file a claim in court. These are not easy things to do as you are risking personal relationships, your livelihood, and your time. You must be resolved not only in your faith, but in the trials you are willing to face. Some people on this thread have mentioned that their employer denied religious accommodations. This is their way of "calling your bluff", if that's what they believe. If you are resolved, then the dispute will get resolved in higher jurisdictions.
  • Most employers don't want to get sued. It seemed to me that I was in the higher position the entire time. Employers are facing pressure from regulatory agencies perhaps. If you do not resist and stand up for your rights, your silence is consent, and they will run roughshod over the rights God gave you. Men and women need to apply pressure back by introducing the possibility of lawsuits. I feel for employers because they are being put in a precarious position. If they do not abuse their employees, they may face fines. If they do impose these draconian measures they could face a lawsuit. At least this way, my possibility of a lawsuit has become real for my employer and they are going to have to craft their policies more carefully.
  • I restate: Your silence is consent.
 

soli.deo.gloria

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
So this is just my dumb personal opinion and I am obviously not a lawyer. I may consider going the religious exemption route as I do genuinely believe that it is immoral and against my religion to use aborted fetal tissue and I also genuinely believe that forces of evil are behind the current vaccine mandate efforts. However I kind of don't even want to do that and my current thinking is that I will politely thank them for their concern and state that my healthcare decisions are private and I am unable to discuss them (including vaccination status) one way or another, but I will not explicitly "refuse" to do anything and I will NOT confirm if I am unvaccinated.

I figure at the end of the day if they have decided to fire you they are going to do it regardless (or make you so miserable you quit) but I believe that puts them in a more difficult position as they basically have to argue against healthcare privacy law which as I understand it has somewhat decent legal protections and they have no explicit grounds for retaliation or termination (and provides you potential legal standing for damages). Although I have heard of a possible loophole where they don't ask you directly but instruct you to report to a doctor (who is allowed to know your details) and let them deal with it. However I think that is a bit more legally ambiguous and doesn't seem to be the direction they are currently going in and if you voluntarily tell them you aren't vaxxed and explicitly refuse that makes it so much easier for them, even if you object on religious grounds.

For example "he didn't explicitly refuse and we don't know for sure but we think he *might* be unvaccinated and he won't tell us about his private health information/status so we fired him" doesn't seem quite as plausible as "he was insubordinate and explicitly refused to follow company/govt policy and be vaccinated and therefore he put people in danger so we fired him". From what I've been seeing I just feel that the religious exemption standing may not be as strong as existing health privacy laws (even though it should be). If you have to you could probably still go the religious route when you talk to the doctor and they probably will accept that, and if not you can try it with your employer as a last resort. Although like I said if they want you gone you are gone, and (((they))) own the legal system the govt and most of the corporations anyway so it's probably just a matter of time no matter what you do. I guess what I am suggesting is just a short term survival strategy until you can fully decouple yourself from the modern world.
 
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Nordwand

Kingfisher
Well, if you are adamant you will not take the vaccine, what have you got to lose? At least make it hard for them.


Scotland today confirmed the introduction of Vaccine Passports. They will begin on 1st October. I am already scheduled to attend a big football (soccer to the Americans) match in October, and I'm guttered. Aye, I know how some of you feel about 'sportsball', but it was something I was looking forward to, and there's not a lot nowadays.

Anyway, I'm considering how I will circumvent the passport.
I have a rock concert to go to in the spring. Right now, I'm not sure which is most likely - me being unable to go because I'm not vaccinated, or the concert being postponed yet again. To be honest, I don't think we'll be getting any more postponements - next time it'll be outright cancellations, with bands going back into the studio to record the next album and start the cycle afresh.
 

darebear

Chicken
I did use this website as a resource: https://www.thehealthyamerican.org/religious-exemptions

I took the DIY route. You do pay to access their documents, but it is a minimal expense in my opinion considering what we are trying to do here, and it is also to support the people who are doing a bunch of legwork.

They establish a set of principles to follow, a step-by-step process to get an exemption, and provide sample documents you can tailor to your needs and circumstances.
 

Sword

Sparrow
I did use this website as a resource: https://www.thehealthyamerican.org/religious-exemptions

I took the DIY route. You do pay to access their documents, but it is a minimal expense in my opinion considering what we are trying to do here, and it is also to support the people who are doing a bunch of legwork.

They establish a set of principles to follow, a step-by-step process to get an exemption, and provide sample documents you can tailor to your needs and circumstances.
How much did it cost, and was there anything in there you cant find online for free?
 

darebear

Chicken
How much did it cost, and was there anything in there you cant find online for free?
The costs can be found using the link. The "DIY" is $59.00. You can find something for free elsewhere, but I felt called to support monetarily since these people are sacrificing a lot of their time to help people.

They provide a bunch of free material as well. I recommend exploring the website,
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
So this is just my dumb personal opinion and I am obviously not a lawyer. I may consider going the religious exemption route as I do genuinely believe that it is immoral and against my religion to use aborted fetal tissue and I also genuinely believe that forces of evil are behind the current vaccine mandate efforts. However I kind of don't even want to do that and my current thinking is that I will politely thank them for their concern and state that my healthcare decisions are private and I am unable to discuss them (including vaccination status) one way or another, but I will not explicitly "refuse" to do anything and I will NOT confirm if I am unvaccinated.

I figure at the end of the day if they have decided to fire you they are going to do it regardless (or make you so miserable you quit) but I believe that puts them in a more difficult position as they basically have to argue against healthcare privacy law which as I understand it has somewhat decent legal protections and they have no explicit grounds for retaliation or termination (and provides you potential legal standing for damages). Although I have heard of a possible loophole where they don't ask you directly but instruct you to report to a doctor (who is allowed to know your details) and let them deal with it. However I think that is a bit more legally ambiguous and doesn't seem to be the direction they are currently going in and if you voluntarily tell them you aren't vaxxed and explicitly refuse that makes it so much easier for them, even if you object on religious grounds.

For example "he didn't explicitly refuse and we don't know for sure but we think he *might* be unvaccinated and he won't tell us about his private health information/status so we fired him" doesn't seem quite as plausible as "he was insubordinate and explicitly refused to follow company/govt policy and be vaccinated and therefore he put people in danger so we fired him". From what I've been seeing I just feel that the religious exemption standing may not be as strong as existing health privacy laws (even though it should be). If you have to you could probably still go the religious route when you talk to the doctor and they probably will accept that, and if not you can try it with your employer as a last resort. Although like I said if they want you gone you are gone, and (((they))) own the legal system the govt and most of the corporations anyway so it's probably just a matter of time no matter what you do. I guess what I am suggesting is just a short term survival strategy until you can fully decouple yourself from the modern world.
I agree with this. If you file for an exemption, you are implicitly agreeing with their mandatory vaccine policy.
 

Papist

Robin
I did use this website as a resource: https://www.thehealthyamerican.org/religious-exemptions

I took the DIY route. You do pay to access their documents, but it is a minimal expense in my opinion considering what we are trying to do here, and it is also to support the people who are doing a bunch of legwork.

They establish a set of principles to follow, a step-by-step process to get an exemption, and provide sample documents you can tailor to your needs and circumstances.
I'd happily contribute financially to someone who did that over here. From what I can understand, though, one should not be adversely discriminated against on the basis of protected characteristics, which includes disability and beliefs. That could be the key here.
 

N°6

Hummingbird
With the multicultural societies that the globalists are trying to create at great risk to populations, I’d be surprised if they strike out religious exemption laws designed to ensure tolerance between otherwise competing groups.
 

soli.deo.gloria

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
With the multicultural societies that the globalists are trying to create at great risk to populations, I’d be surprised if they strike out religious exemption laws designed to ensure tolerance between otherwise competing groups.
Maybe it can be used in our favor as a wedge issue.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
With the multicultural societies that the globalists are trying to create at great risk to populations, I’d be surprised if they strike out religious exemption laws designed to ensure tolerance between otherwise competing groups.
My instinct is that they may allow exemptions, but having an exemption still puts you below someone who has their QR code. According to their own morality, lockdowns are for our own good and safety, and are just. From their they might take steps to accomodate a person but I wouldn't expect full rights beyond the short term.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
My instinct is that they may allow exemptions, but having an exemption still puts you below someone who has their QR code. According to their own morality, lockdowns are for our own good and safety, and are just. From their they might take steps to accomodate a person but I wouldn't expect full rights beyond the short term.
This. Exemptions are at best a short term solution, and at worst they involve cooperation with evil.
 

JustinHS

Pigeon
Orthodox
I believe the idol is multi-faceted -- the notion that mankind determines its own destiny rather than God, the worship of self, of living eternally in this world by our own hands rather than living eternally in the next by God's. The vaccine is a ritual act of submission to this idol, a form of sacrament. As in war, some submit willingly, some are coerced.

I am not taking the vaccine, papers or not. I would rather die at a young age (covid or otherwise) or face ruin than lose my dignity, self-respect, or God's grace.

This is probably a better argument for religious exemption than the aborted fetus route. My supervisor knows about my religiosity and there is already Equal Employment Opportunity program in place in which religious discrimination and harassment is a no-go for them.

I sincerely believe that the jab is a false idol of the world whether or not the (bought and paid for) hierarchs claim otherwise.
 

02Hero

Sparrow
I have not tried/tested this but if the time comes and my employer wants me to explain why I do not have the vaccine I will tell him my doctor advised me to not take it because of previous bad experiences with vaccines.

If that is not enough then they can kick me out. I will survive one way or another.

I am not religious and thus I cannot use any religious reasons.
 

JustinHS

Pigeon
Orthodox
My instinct is that they may allow exemptions, but having an exemption still puts you below someone who has their QR code. According to their own morality, lockdowns are for our own good and safety, and are just. From their they might take steps to accomodate a person but I wouldn't expect full rights beyond the short term.

Disparate Treatment is also a no-go for any place with a robust EEO program. I suspect many HR departments will have to rewrite their policies to specifically exclude the jab from their EEO policies, at which point it will become glaringly obvious to many that there’s just something...devilish about the jab.
 
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