How to get a job as a python (or any other language) developer

Never seen it in Germany. It is forbidden, but I do not know how it would be handled in reality. My employer recently changed the job offers that where listed as "young professional" because it is discriminating against old people. Everybody thought ist was stupid, but it was still changed just to be save.
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Maurice Ravel said:
Do you guys who work in the field have seen this? Or is it blown out of proportion?

Yes. It's the worst.

I've seen it firsthand, having worked in various sectors across the white collar world, including tech. Unfortunately, many tech jobs have these "requirements", even for the higher-skilled jobs. As if having extra pigment or a vagina somehow makes you extra qualified to code. Basically what these ads are saying in simple English is: "If you're a white or asian male, we'll only consider you after we've leafed through every female/minority application." So yes, it's that bad.

It's discrimination in a very clear sense: Asian and Caucasian males are being discriminated against by many tech employers. If this continues past a certain point, I'll look into taking some legal action against these companies. Meritocracy is the only way forward.
 

Pyramid

Chicken
I am currently reading this thread which is, indeed, a goldmine. Thanks everyone.

I have no prior experience nor knowledge in the field but I am a quick learner considering to make the move to spend the next 6 months or so to learn on my own and then start applying (Like many of you guys did).

My question however is related to this COVID/chinese virus situation.
How do you guys see the developer job market for the next couple years? Is everything going to remain the same, or let’s say pretty much the same? or do you think the quantity of interesting developer job offers will tremendously decrease, as well as the salaries?
Do you think some languages will be less affected by the crisis than others? What would you do if you had to start all over again today, under those circumstances?


Also, my goal is to be location independent. By that I mean working for US/European market (in my case Europe) and live in South-East Asia or South America.
Some of you guys have achieved that? What would be the better and quicker way to do it? Going freelance?
I’ve read on this topic people saying: be a great employee then negotiate with the company to be able to work from home. But I don’t see a European company agreeing to have his employee living in a different contient. I have no idea how this works honestly.

Alternative would be to get a local job, which won’t pay as good as US/Europe would, obviously, but after some research at first sight it doesn’t look that terrible in the countries I’m targeting.
Though the problem remains the same because those jobs are based mostly in the capital/big cities whereas I’d prefer to live in a place more quiet. Which means negotiating anyway to do home office. Even though in the same country so probably easier to sell to the company than moving to a different continent.

Anyway, just trying to test the water if this plan of mine of working as a developer (under current/future circumstances) + being able to be location independent is realistic and how hard would that be.
Thanks
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
Pyramid said:
I am currently reading this thread which is, indeed, a goldmine. Thanks everyone.

I have no prior experience nor knowledge in the field but I am a quick learner considering to make the move to spend the next 6 months or so to learn on my own and then start applying (Like many of you guys did).

My question however is related to this COVID/chinese virus situation.
How do you guys see the developer job market for the next couple years? Is everything going to remain the same, or let’s say pretty much the same? or do you think the quantity of interesting developer job offers will tremendously decrease, as well as the salaries?
Do you think some languages will be less affected by the crisis than others? What would you do if you had to start all over again today, under those circumstances?


Also, my goal is to be location independent. By that I mean working for US/European market (in my case Europe) and live in South-East Asia or South America.
Some of you guys have achieved that? What would be the better and quicker way to do it? Going freelance?
I’ve read on this topic people saying: be a great employee then negotiate with the company to be able to work from home. But I don’t see a European company agreeing to have his employee living in a different contient. I have no idea how this works honestly.

Alternative would be to get a local job, which won’t pay as good as US/Europe would, obviously, but after some research at first sight it doesn’t look that terrible in the countries I’m targeting.
Though the problem remains the same because those jobs are based mostly in the capital/big cities whereas I’d prefer to live in a place more quiet. Which means negotiating anyway to do home office. Even though in the same country so probably easier to sell to the company than moving to a different continent.

Anyway, just trying to test the water if this plan of mine of working as a developer (under current/future circumstances) + being able to be location independent is realistic and how hard would that be.
Thanks

It's not a good time to enter the field, but yeah try to study and learn as much as you can. A lot of engineers are getting laid off. It really depends on the industry you're in though. The long-term future is great. Short term, there are engineers flooding the market. Here in Texas, a lot of the Airlines based here have cut their engineering staff. Engineers are the most expensive employees on staff in most industries so we're often the first to get cut.

Living on one side of the globe and working on the other is a rare occurrence unless you're working with an offshore team in a place like India. You will have a huge timezone difference, which makes setting up meetings and communicating very challenging... I don't think it's feasible. Usually they will want you to live and work within one or two timezones of the home base. And as I've said before, 100% remote is a 2nd or 3rd year dev goal not an entry level goal.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
JiggyLordJr said:
Maurice Ravel said:
Do you guys who work in the field have seen this? Or is it blown out of proportion?

Yes. It's the worst.

I've seen it firsthand, having worked in various sectors across the white collar world, including tech. Unfortunately, many tech jobs have these "requirements", even for the higher-skilled jobs. As if having extra pigment or a vagina somehow makes you extra qualified to code. Basically what these ads are saying in simple English is: "If you're a white or asian male, we'll only consider you after we've leafed through every female/minority application." So yes, it's that bad.

It's discrimination in a very clear sense: Asian and Caucasian males are being discriminated against by many tech employers. If this continues past a certain point, I'll look into taking some legal action against these companies. Meritocracy is the only way forward.

There is no mass discrimination against whites and Asians in software engineering (given I'm white and work mostly with whites and Asians, I can attest). Maybe at Google, but that's Google, the majority of companies hiring engineers are not in a position where they are highly choosy for candidates. This isn't marketing or sales, this is engineering, where there a lack of qualified candidates.

A company like Google doesn't reflect the larger world of tech.
 
Would anyone recommend a simple, no BS programming bootcamp that's also accredited and respected (as in FAANG has been proven to hire some of their grads)?

It seems most of these bootcamp outlets want you to jump through their hoops and complete a bunch of exercises and challenges, then do a live interview with more surprise challenges before they ultimately accept you, which I know is their way of screening out the retards but it gets annoying when you need to complete it all as a fresh-faced newbie and by a certain deadline otherwise you don't get in. And they only have so many cohorts and classes per year.

I'm looking for something you can just pay money for and start immediately.
 

tech_support

Chicken
Any one that wants to learn programming I would advise them to go through the SICP book. It was used for the CS 101 course in MIT back in the good old days before they switched to python, but I would say that it's more valuable than any 'how to learn coding' book. One week of using scheme and going through the SICP book is worth more than a lifetime as a java code monkey. It's also free.
 

bali

Sparrow
Can anyone tell me how difficult it is for an American to get a Tech job
in countries in southeast asia - Singapore, Thailand, or Bali?

Are the Tech salaries in Bali and Thailand really low?

Is Singapore really strict for foreign job applicants, but I assume their
salaries are much higher than elsewhere?
 

kel

Ostrich
I had friends working in Singapore, though not in tech. If you have a skill they need, and/or the company is willing to go to bat for you, working in Singapore is relatively easy. And salaries are appropriate.

Getting hired in Bali or Thailand I'd think would mean you get paid as a local. If you wanna live there and work in tech, your best bet is to find remote work in whatever country you're from and do it from Thailand.
 

LostChapter

Kingfisher
Gold Member
IMHO, if anyone on here is a younger guy, the resilient play is to build a skillset that’s business tech related such as being an expert in a widely used ERP (SAP, Oracle), Machine Learning, or such with a basic understanding of business problems (a level equivalent to an undergraduate minor so you can at least read accounting journals or understand supply chain terminology) and locate yourself in a major non-Anglo international trade hub like Singapore or Dubai.

Reason why: a couple things aren’t changing regardless of what agenda is in play. A lot of non-US companies, especially the large banks, have a massive legacy tech burden and will be continuing incremental tech improvements for the next decade or more. Furthermore all of these projects have an international scope which means the day to day work will be happening in the only language all those teams have in common: English (I’m speaking from personal experience on an internship here).

The other option is being a doctor from a well known medical school which opens up a lot of residency options.

If you do that you’ll be have extremely good international Mobility and resilience against a lot of political disruptions.

This post by Easy_C spoke volumes to me, as of recently the sector I currently work in is taking a massive hit.

Before the situation we are all in occurred I had been investing a lot of my spare time into learning the webstack inspired by this thread.

What are peoples thoughts on programming being a possible way to somewhat 'future-proof' employment in the upcoming years?

How are current developers on the forum finding things on the ground?
 
This post by Easy_C spoke volumes to me, as of recently the sector I currently work in is taking a massive hit.

Before the situation we are all in occurred I had been investing a lot of my spare time into learning the webstack inspired by this thread.

What are peoples thoughts on programming being a possible way to somewhat 'future-proof' employment in the upcoming years?

How are current developers on the forum finding things on the ground?

Zed Shaw's Learn Python The Hard Way is a pretty good book. At the end of the book he mentions Python mixed with your profession can lead to breakthroughs in your career. There's plenty of developers but not too many lawyers or scientists that can code. Just my opinion I think the kids in high school are going to have to know how to program (i.e. use terminal) to be able to work in white collar jobs.

Any one that wants to learn programming I would advise them to go through the SICP book. It was used for the CS 101 course in MIT back in the good old days before they switched to python, but I would say that it's more valuable than any 'how to learn coding' book. One week of using scheme and going through the SICP book is worth more than a lifetime as a java code monkey. It's also free.
I'll look into that thanks.
 

vritik

Chicken
Learn Python Frameworks
Furthermore, you need to learn and get proficient with these Python web frameworks to take a step ahead towards your goal of getting a job as a Python fresher. There are various Python web frameworks out there such as Django, Flask, Web2Py.

and i would reccomend more languages you should learn if you to succed in programming..

according to me these are the top languages every programmer should learn in 2021 as it is 2021 are

Python.

Python is still at the top of the tree.

Python is a language that every programmer should have in their arsenal, even if you are just starting your career in 2021. Python features a simple and easy-to-understand syntax. As a result, it is an excellent place to start for a newbie.
Golang.
Golang, or simply "Go," is a Google-developed programming language. The rise of Golang to the top of the programming languages to learn league has been gradual.

C#.
C# is a Microsoft-developed programming language that has gained popularity in the online and game development areas. It's most commonly found in the Unity software, which is used to create 2D and 3D video games.

C / C ++.
C/ C++ is utilised in the majority of low-level systems, including operating systems, embedded systems, and kernel development, because to its speed and high levels of functionality.

Java.
Another top programming language for 2021 is Java. Despite being one of the oldest languages known, it is still in high demand.

JavaScript
Another top programming language for 2021 is Java. Despite being one of the oldest languages known, it is still in high demand.


read this it will also help other readers..
thanks for sharing your problems..
 
Just learning Python, or any other scripting language for that matter won't give you a job.

If you understand the fundamental concepts of programming i.e loops, conditionals, etc., learning a new language is just a matter of going through the documentation of that language. Cramming syntax isn't a very impressive skill to have, one can always Google that. What impresses people are your problem-solving skills.

Let's say you know Python, and you apply for a job at a company working in the field of data analysis. Your application would be judged mainly on the basis of your knowledge of Probability and Statistics, and other related fields.

Programming languages are just tools to solve complex problems.
Just having tools doesn't make a good craftsman.

Below are Python Job Profiles

1. Software Engineer
2. Research Analyst
3. Data Analyst
4. Data Scientist
5. Software Developer
 
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