Idea: buying a one way flight abroad and not looking back

booshala said:
@Westcoast: You make great points about slogging it out in your 20's to handle your sit in your 30's onward... I agree in principle, but only a select few have the ability to be high earners in Finance or if you're really lucky and work in a startup that gets bought out when they are that young. The majority of guys in their 20's are going to be making $35k-$100k annually in those 8 years if they graduate from university. Even if they bank a significant amount of their after-tax income, that's only going to be low-mid 6 figures. You can definitely live on that for the foreseeable future in SE Asia, but you're not going to be balling on that.
It's not about getting lucky.

It's about going out there and taking responsibility for your own wealth.

Whether that means starting your own business or learning a skill set and working in a high paying job.

There are always opportunities for those that look... and want.

Even if you fail at starting a biz or finding a good job, you're going to be hugely richer than your peers because of the experience you got. You learn from failures and even if it takes you another 5 years (up to 35...), you can still earn the wedge to live life on your own terms.
 

ASOT

Sparrow
Gold Member
Man this thread is a fucking gold mine of advise. It's filled to the brim with experience from doers. Thanks to everyone who shared their experience.

I think the general consensus is that you have three options.

1-hunker down, build something over the long term, reap the rewards later (WestCoast & Lavidaloca).
2-hunker down, rapidly build some skills and 'location independent' income, then travel and never stop building on this (Tigre, Beyond Borders, worldwidetraveler, travolta)
3-hunker down, work your ass off in the freezing oil sands, work your way up the pay ranks and travel in the down season (Vacancier Permanent & rudebwoy)

And that regardless of what you take a small trip as a diversion won't hurt.

Interestingly nobody who went down the route of option 2 built their lifestyle whilst traveling, they all put the foundation in place beforehand. Reality is travel is for enjoyment, if you try and build an income whilst traveling you'll fail on that front and fail to enjoy that travel. That's my view and as I too seek to go down the route of option 2 I'm keeping the two separate.

Key take away is that none of the options allow you to escape hunkering down. Nothing worth it comes easy. True freedom in whatever form requires you to work, simply clicking a few buttons for a one way flight doesn't require work. Thanks to all those who shared.
 

ASOT

Sparrow
Gold Member
lavidaloca said:
The problem is your definition of what you think would be a great retirement income will likely increase when your salary increases and it makes an almost never ending desire / requirement for more.

Personally, 3 years ago a million would've been fine to retire in my books. Last year I was thinking well with 2 million I could probably live pretty damn well abroad on 80k per year or so. Now I think 5 million is what I'd need because I mean who doesn't want to ball out in their 40s. It makes it really difficult mentally to step aside and say enough is enough. With 1 million now not a chance I'd retire or leave work.
Hey mate. First, I loved reading your Cuba advise.

Now regarding this post. I'm presuming you've already hit the $2m mark in somewhat of a liquid position. No doubt you've also built a nice lifestyle level that requires a certain amount, and as you get older naturally that level increases. Not to mention any responsibilities you have towards parents & potential children that will cost. In your position taking a downgrade is really out of the option.

But if $5m is the new benchmark, then what about when you hit that level? Will you not be happy until you have $15m? How old will you be then? Will you be too old to enjoy?

Some of the older guys I know who live the best lifestyles have a no more than $2 million net worth, this includes their house, and leaves a sum that allows a modest investment income (4-5%). But at their own choosing they'll consult for $100+ hourly figures which funds the new cars, nice lifestyle, holidays etc. Some do it year round. Others do it contract by contract and travel in between. Another has a business that he leaves for 3-4 month periods and has his son in charge. A phone call per week to get some updates is all he does. When he comes back the business is still earning the same if not more, and there's a fat sum of retained earnings to boot. Unless you're beginning to earn money in a parabolic rate through whatever you're doing, maybe you need to try a different approach? If you are going parabolic, well then ride that wave haha. Cheers.
 
I'm doing this right now. Living with parents and building an online business. This year is insane as things picked up and I'm making like $5,000/month.

My expenses? Hmm, barely none. (except for the car)

My target is to have a good apartment somewhere in the country ($120K value), plus $50K invested in stable index funds, and some liquid cash ($20-30k). I already have a nice new car (bought last year)

My (updated) goal this year, is to be making $15K/month by the end of the year.

It's pretty amazing since only 3 years later I was the definition of the word "broke" and borrowed $150 from my sister to buy a laptop.
 

lavidaloca

Pelican
Gold Member
ASOT said:
lavidaloca said:
The problem is your definition of what you think would be a great retirement income will likely increase when your salary increases and it makes an almost never ending desire / requirement for more.

Personally, 3 years ago a million would've been fine to retire in my books. Last year I was thinking well with 2 million I could probably live pretty damn well abroad on 80k per year or so. Now I think 5 million is what I'd need because I mean who doesn't want to ball out in their 40s. It makes it really difficult mentally to step aside and say enough is enough. With 1 million now not a chance I'd retire or leave work.
Hey mate. First, I loved reading your Cuba advise.

Now regarding this post. I'm presuming you've already hit the $2m mark in somewhat of a liquid position. No doubt you've also built a nice lifestyle level that requires a certain amount, and as you get older naturally that level increases. Not to mention any responsibilities you have towards parents & potential children that will cost. In your position taking a downgrade is really out of the option.

But if $5m is the new benchmark, then what about when you hit that level? Will you not be happy until you have $15m? How old will you be then? Will you be too old to enjoy?

Some of the older guys I know who live the best lifestyles have a no more than $2 million net worth, this includes their house, and leaves a sum that allows a modest investment income (4-5%). But at their own choosing they'll consult for $100+ hourly figures which funds the new cars, nice lifestyle, holidays etc. Some do it year round. Others do it contract by contract and travel in between. Another has a business that he leaves for 3-4 month periods and has his son in charge. A phone call per week to get some updates is all he does. When he comes back the business is still earning the same if not more, and there's a fat sum of retained earnings to boot. Unless you're beginning to earn money in a parabolic rate through whatever you're doing, maybe you need to try a different approach? If you are going parabolic, well then ride that wave haha. Cheers.
I haven't reached 2 million, I should get there in 6 to 8 years. It's not practical for me to have saved that amount as I'm in my mid 20's. I need more compounding periods to take advantage of. But everyone wants the level that seems out of reach to themselves. It's like a guy in the NBA getting paid 2 million a year. He probably thinks, I ought to make 10 million a year in order to have sufficient money. It's a never ending progression.

When I started going to Cuba several years ago, during my first few week solo trip I thought I was a baller with $50 Canadian a day. Every year my burn rate in Cuba has increased. I can't even imagine trying to do it on that type of money anymore. At $100 a day there I still feel pretty confined. At $150 I'm comfortable but not balling either. I'm sure that number will continually rise upwards.

Part of my reasoning as to why I feel I'll need more and more net worth is simple. Inflation is going to add up over an entire lifetime. $1 or $2 million in 40 years won't have anywhere near the same value it does now. When someone retires at 70 they have a lot less to worry about in terms of inflation than someone who is retiring at 40.

Some people have careers where they can simply leave and go back to work after taking a decade or 2 off (generally manual labour). Hence, even if their investments under perform over a long period of time they can go back to work. I don't have that type of career.

It's a general principle. Mentally, everything begins scaling up and up in your mind.
 

Biz

Kingfisher
This concept is something I've been thinking about on a daily basis for over 5 years.

Great input so far on this thread.
 
I flew into London on Aug 6 this year on a one way ticket, alone, didn't really do much for planning and I've been kinda taking it as it comes. I don't work, nor do I intend to. If I wanted to work, I could have stayed home for that.

That said, there's a lot of romance in the whole one way ticket, backpacking lifestyle, but there's a lot of bullshit too. For one, it's mentally exhausting. I gotta think about today, but also tomorrow, but also a few days down the road but that never stops. It's a constant shuffle. Tomorrow becomes today, and a couple days from now becomes today. I gotta be careful too. Nobody is here to watch my back. I don't think I look like a victim, but I'm not trying to get pickpocketed due to negligence either. My clothes? Almost always in varying stages of dirty, unless I want to pay 10 euro for somebody to wash them. That pisses me off btw. I've been doing my own laundry since I could spin the knobs, which for me was pretty young. I don't mind going to a laundromat, but paying somebody 10 euro to do it for me with no other real options kills the shit outta me. Dinner is sometimes a block of Tesco cheese you eat in the rain while you're walking back to your hostel. The hours can be hard to fill like you're not a layabout and you're not trying to spend a lot of cash. Working sucks, but it's something to do anyway. I also do feel like an island onto myself sometimes. In Japan, I knew I was foreign, so did everybody else. Here it's so close, yet so far, culturally, linguistically, etc.

That said, I've generally had a good time. Saw some cool stuff, met some cool people, but I'm also working my way back west from Prague now. I'm pretty physically and mentally tired, I picked up a cough I can't shake, and late October is generally a nice time in my home area of the Midwest. I'm planning on resting up for a couple weeks and doing a little road trip.

Could I live in Europe? Sure, but in a small town. But that's the case for in the states too. Which is better? Neither. They do stuff that works for them, we do stuff that works for us.
 

aeroektar

Pelican
I've lived a vagabond lifestyle for the last year, going from place to place, 6 countries, about a dozen cities, no job, no commitments, I just kinda do whatever I want and pack up and leave whenever I want. A truly hedonistic existence.

I've had so many extreme ups and downs this year, it feels like I've put my body and mind through a meatgrinder. I don't even know what to think about life anymore, but the whole experience has changed my perspective on everything so much. I've been in some really deep ruts over the last couple months, that drove me to go to church and pray daily.

The only thing I feel motivated to do is work out. Everything else feels like I'm cheating myself. I have goals and aspirations, but I see the world around me and how superficial it is and it shuts me down. I need to find a way to make money soon but it all feels pointless. The only thing I could see as fulfilling would be farming or producing something truly valuable, but that's not a possibility until I settle down, and I don't want to settle down yet, so I feel lost. I have lists of things to do to start making money, but I can't find the motivation to do them. I think I'm just being a cunt and I need someone to smack me, this is probably in part a result of being raised without a father. I've had this problem all my life, I'm stubborn about commiting to things, but once I do I become obsessed. At times I honestly think I need to knock up the next decent broad I find, that will motivate me.

I'd still rather be where I am right now then living in a small city outside Boston surrounded by junkies, fatties, feminists and old people, which felt like a hopeless situation, and the thought of having to return to that does motivate me.
 
That's the other thing, nobody tells you how you just get ground down. You can only fight it so long. Your don't sleep great in hostels. In my case, I'm walking 5-10 or more miles a day. Every country or area is different. Ireland, you buy a bus ticket from the driver. Slovakia, you buy it from a machine. Budapest, you buy it from a machine, but there's about six machines in the whole town it seems. Vienna, you buy it from a tobacco shop. Czech republic, you get it from a machine. Figuring that shit out every time is exhausting. Currency, sometimes it's euro, sometimes not. Gotta figure out that. You can't just apply knowledge, you gotta learn it new every time.

These people in youtube or Instagram, #alwaystraveling, I don't know how they do it. Even if everything was paid for, dealing with this is so overwhelming. I've been on the road six weeks and I think about my nice quiet basement bedroom a lot. Nice, quiet, nobody bothers you, nothing new to look it. It's great...
 

JiggyLordJr

Woodpecker
aeroektar said:
I've lived a vagabond lifestyle for the last year, going from place to place, 6 countries, about a dozen cities, no job, no commitments, I just kinda do whatever I want and pack up and leave whenever I want. A truly hedonistic existence.

I've had so many extreme ups and downs this year, it feels like I've put my body and mind through a meatgrinder. I don't even know what to think about life anymore, but the whole experience has changed my perspective on everything so much. I've been in some really deep ruts over the last couple months, that drove me to go to church and pray daily.

The only thing I feel motivated to do is work out. Everything else feels like I'm cheating myself. I have goals and aspirations, but I see the world around me and how superficial it is and it shuts me down. I need to find a way to make money soon but it all feels pointless. The only thing I could see as fulfilling would be farming or producing something truly valuable, but that's not a possibility until I settle down, and I don't want to settle down yet, so I feel lost. I have lists of things to do to start making money, but I can't find the motivation to do them. I think I'm just being a cunt and I need someone to smack me, this is probably in part a result of being raised without a father. I've had this problem all my life, I'm stubborn about commiting to things, but once I do I become obsessed. At times I honestly think I need to knock up the next decent broad I find, that will motivate me.

I'd still rather be where I am right now then living in a small city outside Boston surrounded by junkies, fatties, feminists and old people, which felt like a hopeless situation, and the thought of having to return to that does motivate me.
Sounds like we have similar situations. Allow me to chime in on this golden thread.

A few months ago I turned 22. Fed up with 9-5 internships and the pipe-dream that my uni had sold me, I dropped out, sold all my shit, and bought a one way ticket to Western Europe. No degree. No skills. Two Passports. One dream. I scrambled together just enough money to keep me afloat for the first two months. Could I have stayed stateside longer and stacked up more cash? Sure, but the spiritual poverty of the West was crushing me from within, and I knew with a deep conviction that I had to get out - and soon. So that I did.

Needless to say, these first three months have been nothing short of a mind twister. Living a comfortable life in a first tier city does not prepare you for the trials of living abroad. I've had the highs of furnishing a flat in a beautiful, medieval city, and the lows of going completely broke and turning to the dole for basic sustenance. My brain is so fried from the transition that many days I can only muster up the energy to go workout. Grinding away on eggs and creatine put me in the top 5% health-wise, yet I find myself lingering at the bottom 5% money-wise. You don't know irony til you're the shredded, brokest person in the room. Funny how that works.

A sensitive point you brought up deserves a paragraph of its own: Growing up without a father present stunts you in ways that you discover only when pushed off the deep end. Teaching yourself to be a man is hard when one has only grown up around women; with no masculine model to base yourself on, you grope blindly in the darkness for a figure of strength. To say that this missing piece hollows you out is an understatement. My heart goes out to all the guys who are also facing this unknowable chasm.

But despite the brain fog, loneliness, cultural barriers, and language difficulties, I find the willpower to push through all of the hard times. Nothing quite teaches you the ropes like being alone on a foreign continent, and a desire emerges to better yourself constantly. For example, I've developed a language learning system that improves retention, and I've also completely taken control of my time (data sheet coming soon.) Inspired by the self-employed thread - and now this one - I'm working hard to learn the basics and take an online biz off the ground. Things do get better, but there are many trials and tribulations that come with being an unmoored male. Some men get their shit together in a few months, while others take years just to clear out all of the skeletons. Human experience varies like that. To all of you out there pushing yourself in spite of the hand you were dealt, I applaud you, for you have laughed in the devil's face. Stay strong my brothers.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
JiggyLordJr said:
Growing up without a father present stunts you in ways that you discover when pushed off the deep end. Teaching yourself to be a man is hard when one has only grown up around women; with no masculine model to base yourself on, you grope blindly in the darkness for a figure of strength. To say that this missing piece hollows you out is an understatement. My heart goes out to all the other guys facing the unknowable chasm.

But despite the brain fog, loneliness, cultural barriers, and language difficulties, I find the willpower to push through all of the hard times. Nothing quite teaches you the ropes like being alone on a foreign continent... To all of you out there pushing yourself in spite of the hand you were dealt, I applaud you, for you have laughed in the devil's face. Stay strong brothers.
Man, at times you write like Kipling and Tennyson are discussing life. Much respect.
 

phluff127

Sparrow
Funny, I just went on a walk and was reminiscing about some of the times I had when I bought a one way ticket to London with absolutely no itinerary and traveled the world alone for seven months. My intention was to just play poker for money but I caught a cold stretch of cards. Stay strong fellas and keep pushing. These are the days you will always remember. Don’t forget the power of positive thinking and remember the reason you bought that ticket in the first place. Now go explore!
 

JiggyLordJr

Woodpecker
phluff127 said:
Funny, I just went on a walk and was reminiscing about some of the times I had when I bought a one way ticket to London with absolutely no itinerary and traveled the world alone for seven months. My intention was to just play poker for money but I caught a cold stretch of cards. Stay strong fellas and keep pushing. These are the days you will always remember. Don’t forget the power of positive thinking and remember the reason you bought that ticket in the first place. Now go explore!
Absolutely - keeping the original dream in mind is key. Traveling like this is really the spice of life, it's about as close to absolute freedom as you can get.
 
phluff127 said:
Funny, I just went on a walk and was reminiscing about some of the times I had when I bought a one way ticket to London with absolutely no itinerary and traveled the world alone for seven months. My intention was to just play poker for money but I caught a cold stretch of cards. Stay strong fellas and keep pushing. These are the days you will always remember. Don’t forget the power of positive thinking and remember the reason you bought that ticket in the first place. Now go explore!
Hey, you are not alone about getting a cold stretch of cards right after starting to travel! Just have to play through it, always fun to start a new month of poker and not knowing if you will make 3k or lose 3k :s
 

phluff127

Sparrow
Have you been playing poker in casinos abroad or online? My Only experience playing no limit hold em in a casino was in Medellin Colombia and it was wild! They were the loosest players I have ever played with, it was crazy. Like by American standards they were so loose they’d Just be considered bad players. I just couldn’t catch anything and busted in the tournament I played in. I could def see making some cash though playing there as there was a lot of action.

You’re right traveling like that really is the spice of life. I remember waking up in Rome and trying to decide to go that night to Egypt or India for a week. I went to Egypt and ended up staying over a month. Now that is true freedom. Just go for it!

My new thing is I found a job that pretty much is always looking for employees and pays decent so if I leave they will hire me whenever I return. I’m gonna work for six months and save cash and then hit the road. Check out Gabriel Traveler on YouTube, that dudes got it figured out.
 
I am in Australia got a one-way ticket here a month ago. When I want to live on the cheap I: rent a car, sleep in the car, eat peanut butter and jelly. Wash up in handicapped bathrooms at MacDonald's. Every now and then I do a little work online at MacDonald's, or I splurge on an Airbnb. I am not crazy about the hostel scene. I think my car is better than hostels. I never have trouble sleeping in my car, although I found hostels a drag. I can also tether my laptop to my phone if I am at a roadside rest stop and can't online at MacDonald's. When I get tired of the road life, I find a likely woman online (Facebook), some more attractive than others, usually can count on hot meal and shower a few nights a week. Now it is spring over here so not so warm. In summer I stay down south in Victoria where it is cooler (remember Man from Snowy River? Yeah in that area in the summer), and stay in hotels when it is too hot to comfortably sleep in my car, or if I get a larger job that pays well and requires more concentration. It is a blast. Total freedom.
 
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