Impact on the Russian Orthodox Church in Western nations

Belgrano

Ostrich
Gold Member
Not a Western nation, but Ukraine itself. Still relevant I think:

In the town of Gorodok in the Lviv region, the activities of the UOC were banned

On February 28, 2022, the head of the Gorodok City Council in the Lviv region, Vladimir Remenyak, published an official order on the Facebook page "Banning the activities of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate."

In it, priests and parishioners of the UOC are accused of anti-state and anti-Ukrainian activities, of creating "artificial confrontation between certain groups of the Ukrainian people" and of "splitting Ukrainian society on a religious basis." Therefore, Vladimir Remenyak, by his decree, banned the activities of the UOC as "posing a danger to the national security of Ukraine."

The text says that the decision to ban the UOC was made by the authorities after the appeal of representatives of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church of the village of Rechichany.

Keep in mind that with the beginning of the war in Ukraine, a lot of fake news appeared on the networks that the UOC allegedly hides weapons in churches. All these denunciations are consistently checked and refuted by the SBU.

As the SPJ wrote, the Uniates seized the UOC church near Ivano-Frankivsk.

Apparently there are other incidents as well:

OCU adherents beat a UOC priest and ruin a prayer house in Novozhyvotiv

In Novozhyvotiv, Vinnytsia region, Orthodox Church of Ukraine members beat a priest and smashed the prayer room of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate community.

A group of supporters of the OCU in the village of Novozhivotov, Vinnytsia region, beat an Orthodox priest and smashed the prayer room of the community of the Holy Intercession church of the UOC. This is reported by 1Kozak on its Facebook page.

The channel was informed from the scene that on February 25, around 11:00, “the rector of the church, Archpriest Peter Monastyrsky, was warned that adherents of the OCU were gathering near the church.”

When the priest arrived at the place, he saw that the prayer room had been destroyed along with all the churchware and icons.

“For a long time, the community has been forced to fight for its shrine and pray in a small hut near the church,” the journalists say. “But what they had done didn’t seem enough to the barbarians. The defilers of the church rushed at the clergyman, knocked him down and continued to kick him.”

Police were called to the scene, but they did absolutely nothing. The police said that the prayer room is not a registered building, and the believers should now simply remove it. At the same time, the police refused to accept a statement from Archpriest Peter Monastyrsky.

“Law enforcement officers told the priest that no one would start any action until he had his battery-induced injuries verified. The nearest place where it can be done is Haisyn town, which is located 70 km from Novozhyvotiv. Naturally, it was impossible to get to Haisyn given the priest's poor physical state,” say the 1Kozak journalists.

Mariupol: Unidentified men in uniform rob cathedral and beat up UOC priest

Unidentified men in balaclavas have made an armed attack on the St. Nicholas Cathedral of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Mariupol.

A group of people in military uniforms and balaclavas have carried out an armed attack on the St. Nicholas Cathedral of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Mariupol, reports the official website of the Donetsk Eparchy "Donbass Orthodox".

Armed looters broke into the church during the performance of the sacrament of Baptism by the priest.

"The armed men beat an employee, a security guard and a priest, took money from the church safe, food and household items, and also stole two cars of the clergy from the church grounds," says the message on the eparchy’s website.

The cathedral staff could not identify the group as belonging to a particular type of armed formation as they were in a "state of shock".

 

infowarrior1

Crow
Protestant
Agreed. Sadly I feel like protestant congregations might look at it as being a "foreign religion" and therefore no impact to them or a "gee I'm glad that's not happening to us" mindset. It probably wouldn't even be mentioned during the service. They would also be witnessing the media stigmatizing Orthodoxy as a baaaad Russian religion tisk tisk.

Perhaps I'm being too harsh and/or cynical but I just don't have a lot of hope in Western churches rallying around persecuted Orthodox. I hope I'm wrong though and even more pray that it won't come to that point.

No matter what they decide and probably most of the Leadership will decide. Many Protestants will be behind the persecuted Orthodox. And also I suspect many of the saved Protestants(The so called Russian Trolls) outside this forum will be behind them too.

For the Holy Spirit will move those who are Christ's to Pray and do what they can for his Body.
 

Poche

 
Banned
Catholic
I think it should be noted that the Ukrainian Orthodox church of the Moscow patriarchal has condemned the Russian invasion.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
It is to be expected that (Orthodox) Christians are to be persecuted. I'm surprised it hasn't openly happened in the last years.

If you were of the world, the world would love you as its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you. Remember the word that I said to you: ‘A servant is not greater than his master.’ If they persecuted me, they will also persecute you. If they keep my word, they will also keep yours.
 

nagareboshi

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I've been at the receiving end of various ugly rants and diatribes from a Ukrainian uniate friend (under Pope Francis) for these past few months, but the final straw was a highly personal, thoughtfully-written attack on my own individual character for joining the Orthodox Church, which included several private details. I decided to cut this person off, but I am also guilty of reacting in anger.

I guess in the long run it's to be expected. Your prayers would be appreciated so that I can overcome the passion of anger, and I am sure my uniate ex-friend would appreciate our prayers as well.
 

Poche

 
Banned
Catholic
I've been at the receiving end of various ugly rants and diatribes from a Ukrainian uniate friend (under Pope Francis) for these past few months, but the final straw was a highly personal, thoughtfully-written attack on my own individual character for joining the Orthodox Church, which included several private details. I decided to cut this person off, but I am also guilty of reacting in anger.

I guess in the long run it's to be expected. Your prayers would be appreciated so that I can overcome the passion of anger, and I am sure my uniate ex-friend would appreciate our prayers as well.
Follow your conscience - Pope Francis.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Ostrich
Orthodox
This is one of Canada's popular Catholic priests. He writes for major newspapers. He also makes ridiculous statements about the Russian Church and Ukraine.


I've bolded some of the outlandish claims.

HOW SHOULD POPE FRANCIS AND THE HOLY SEE DEAL WITH THE HEAD OF THE RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH?​

Vatican diplomacy in regards to Russia’s war against Ukraine is operating at three levels, said Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin: religious, humanitarian and diplomatic.

The Church sends up “insistent prayer” to God, coordinates relief through her charitable agencies, and offers her diplomatic offices. Cardinal Parolin himself spoke with the Russian foreign minister, offering the good offices of the Holy See to broker an end to the invasion.

One level was left out of Cardinal Parolin’s list: the ecclesial or ecumenical level. In times of such conflict, one Christian response is to pray together as a Church, including with those Christians with whom we share imperfect communion. That is impossible at the moment.

Call it the Kirill Question. How should Pope Francis and the Holy See deal with Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and head of the Russian Orthodox Church?

Joint prayer with him is impossible for two reasons: First, he would likely be praying for the success of the Russian invasion, not its end, as he is staunchly allied with Vladimir Putin and Russian state power.

Second, Kirill himself has broken off communion with Bartholomew, the Ecumenical Patriarch in Constantinople, because Bartholomew recognized an autonomous Orthodox Church in Ukraine. Some Russian Orthodox bishops in Ukraine have refused to mention Kirill’s name in the liturgy given his support for Putin’s invasion. Kirill has declared them to be in schism.

Patriarch Kirill is a figure of division in the Orthodox Church today, not a source of unity; a figure of war, not of peace.


It is an immense scandal, but not a surprise.

Under Lenin and Stalin, the Russian Orthodox Church was almost entirely liquidated, suffering an immense martyrdom measured in hundreds of thousands. By 1941, only a few Russian Orthodox bishops remained; the Church was nearly extinct in terms of its hierarchy.

Then Hitler invaded Russia, and Stalin needed to rally all of Mother Russia for a fight to the death with Nazi Germany. Stalin called it the Great Patriotic War, and needed the Russian Orthodox Church to do its part. So he revived the Church to rally Russian society, but the reconstitution of the Church was done on Soviet state terms. It became a de facto part of the regime.

The Russian Orthodox Church was reborn in the context of state power and war aims. Over subsequent generations, the Church was never able to free itself entirely from the clutches of the state. Under Putin, Russian state patronage has meant the increasing subjugation of the Church for national — and now military — purposes.

The architecturally magnificent Cathedral of the Russian Armed Forces demonstrates how far this alliance has gone; portraits of both Stalin and Putin were contemplated, but later abandoned.

For generations, it was not possible for Russian Orthodox clergy to go for advanced studies, get routine bureaucratic permissions or advance in the hierarchy without cooperation with the officially atheist Soviet regime. Hence many senior Orthodox bishops were collaborators, including Kirill himself, who was a former KGB asset.

The Russian invasion has not only isolated Russia diplomatically and economically, but has also isolated Kirill.
 

nagareboshi

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Typical boomer tier State Department nonsense from the Franko-Latin NGO. Where’s ROCOR in Mr. Desouza’s Soviet history lesson, a “small” organization whose story of courage and repentance put all of the modern western churches to shame? Who “really” was responsible for the new schismatic church in Ukraine? Funny how the Russian Church is always labeled as a “state actor” whenever it acts against western interests, but the Franko-Latin church, which has been a slave of secular powers since the 9th century, is somehow totally independent.
 
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sarmaticus

Robin
Orthodox
I go to a Greek Orthodox parish (GOARCH) but I'm also worried for the safety of ROCOR parishioners and all Orthodox Christians in America. This Russophobia could very well turn into an open hatred of all Orthodox Christians in the US.
Ukrainians are also Orthodox so hopefully remains a moot point for now and satan has to work a bit more on this one to succeed. But nothing surprises me anymore with these legions of brainwashed seculars and atheists in the 'vest'.
 

Samseau

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
Bartholomew is a traitor to the church and deserves to be defrocked and anathema'd. He had no right or jurisdiction to declare Ukrainian churches independent from Russian ones, that was a major decision that should have involved a majority agreement of the world's major patriarchs.

He directly influenced and helped foster the current war in Ukraine by creating strong divisions within the Church there. He is an agent of Satan and must be publicly shamed at every chance.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Ostrich
Orthodox
Bartholomew is a traitor to the church and deserves to be defrocked and anathema'd. He had no right or jurisdiction to declare Ukrainian churches independent from Russian ones, that was a major decision that should have involved a majority agreement of the world's major patriarchs.

He directly influenced and helped foster the current war in Ukraine by creating strong divisions within the Church there. He is an agent of Satan and must be publicly shamed at every chance.

All we can do is to pray for him.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Ostrich
Orthodox
Typical boomer tier State Department nonsense from the Franko-Latin NGO. Where’s ROCOR in Mr. Desouza’s Soviet history lesson, a “small” organization whose story of courage and repentance put all of the modern western churches to shame? Who “really” was responsible for the new schismatic church in Ukraine? Funny how the Russian Church is always labeled as a “state actor” whenever it acts against western interests, but the Franko-Latin church, which has been a slave of secular powers since the 9th century, is somehow totally independent.

Leaving aside the fact that Fr. DeSouza claims that the Orthodox can do 'joint prayer' with non-Orthodox Christians, which should NEVER happen!

I also see no evidence that Patriarch Kirill is praying for Russian victory.
 

Samseau

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
All we can do is to pray for him.

We can do a lot more than that; in addition, we can pray for his removal, and speak publicly against him inside of your parishes. His behavior is an abomination to God and if we do not humiliate and shame him out of the church, God may forsake us. Turning a blind eye to this kind of evil when the house of God is supposed to be there for the salvation of man is not an option, lest we risk being forsaken like so many other Churches are.
 

Laus Deo

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Further to @Samseau's posts above

Russian Orthodox church in Amsterdam announces split with Moscow​

Clergy takes ‘difficult decision’ to cut ties with the Moscow patriarchate over the invasion of Ukraine
A Russian Orthodox church in Amsterdam in 2020.

A Russian Orthodox church in Amsterdam in 2020. More than 280 Russian Orthodox priests and church officials from around the world have signed an open letter expressing their opposition to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Photograph: Koen van Weel/ANP/AFP/Getty Images

Pjotr Sauer
Mon 14 Mar 2022 05.03 AEDT


A Russian Orthodox church in Amsterdam has announced it is to split with the Moscow patriarchate, in the first known instance of a western-based church cutting ties over the invasion of Ukraine.
“The clergy unanimously announced that it is no longer possible for them to function within the Moscow patriarchate and provide a spiritually safe environment for our faithful,” the clergy said in a statement posted on its website. “This decision is extremely painful and difficult for all concerned.”

The head of the Russian Orthodox church, Patriarch Kirill, a trusted ally of Vladimir Putin, has declined to condemn the Kremlin’s decision to invade its neighbour, referring to Russia’s opponents in Ukraine as “evil forces”. In a Sunday sermon last week he also said gay pride parades organised in the west were part of the reason for the war in Ukraine.
The statement said the Russian Orthodox parish of Saint Nicholas of Myra had asked the Russian archbishop of the diocese of the Netherlands, who is based in The Hague, to grant the church “canonical dismissal”.
The clergy of the parish said they had requested to join the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the Istanbul-based Orthodox branch, seen as a rival to the Russian Orthodox church.
Kirill’s position on the war has led to unease among some Russian Orthodox priests who object to the invasion of a country often referred to as a “brotherly nation” in religious circles.
More than 280 Russian Orthodox priests and church officials from around the world signed an open letter expressing their opposition to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. It said “eternal torment” awaited those who gave “murderous orders”.
The Russian Orthodox church in Amsterdam, which consists of four priests and a deacon – one of the biggest Russian Orthodox congregations in the Netherlands – has been critical of Russia’s role in the war since the start of the invasion on 24 February.
It said last week it would no longer mention the name of Patriarch Kirill in its liturgy because of his backing for the invasion of Ukraine. “We as the clergy of St Nicholas parish in Amsterdam have expressed our shock at the invasion of Ukraine by the armed forces of the Russian Federation … We distance ourselves from Patriarch Kirill’s narrative,” it wrote on its Facebook page.
The statement went against the official policy of the Russian Orthodox church not to use the word “war” and “invasion” to describe Russia’s actions in Ukraine.
The Russian priests in Amsterdam told the Dutch outlet ND that Archbishop Elisey of the Netherlands visited their church afterwards, warning that “Moscow was watching their actions closely”.
The Amsterdam church held a closed session on Sunday in which the head of the parish reiterated the decision to break with Moscow. “We asked our former Patriarch Kirill to stop the war. Unfortunately, this did not happen,” he said in a video address posted on the church’s YouTube page.
A Russian member of the church’s choir who was standing outside the church told the Guardian she supported the decision to separate from Moscow. “Once the war started, there was only one way out of this,” she said, asking not to give her name.
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has also been criticised by other Christian religious leaders, including the head of Patriarchate of Constantinople, Bartholomew I of Constantinople, and Pope Francis, who on Sunday issued his toughest condemnation yet of the invasion, saying the “unacceptable armed aggression” must stop.
Bartholomew, considered to be the spiritual leader of the world’s Eastern Orthodox Christians, earlier said Putin had committed “a great injustice” by going to war against his “coreligionists” and had “earned the hatred of the whole world”.
In 2018 the Russian Orthodox church cut ties with the Patriarchate of Constantinople, seen as the spiritual authority of the world’s Orthodox Christians, after Bartholomew granted independence to the Ukrainian Orthodox church, which was previously under Moscow’s control.
Link
 

Samseau

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has also been criticised by other Christian religious leaders, including the head of Patriarchate of Constantinople, Bartholomew I of Constantinople, and Pope Francis, who on Sunday issued his toughest condemnation yet of the invasion, saying the “unacceptable armed aggression” must stop.
Bartholomew, considered to be the spiritual leader of the world’s Eastern Orthodox Christians, earlier said Putin had committed “a great injustice” by going to war against his “coreligionists” and had “earned the hatred of the whole world”.
In 2018 the Russian Orthodox church cut ties with the Patriarchate of Constantinople, seen as the spiritual authority of the world’s Orthodox Christians, after Bartholomew granted independence to the Ukrainian Orthodox church, which was previously under Moscow’s control.

Look at all the glowing praise the chews heap onto Black Bart, in the trash rag the guardian, what further proof do you need this man has sold his soul to Satan? They call him the spiritual leader, but to whom does he lead? Constantinople only has a single parish under it's control. They try to equate him to the Pope, when of course every Patriarch is equal to one another and there aren't any Popes within the Orthodox Church.

If Black Bart, and the people he represents inside of the Orthodox Church, are not stopped, then we will see rainbow flag outside of Orthodox churches someday. The same for Catholics with their antichrist Pope. If he's been chosen by the chews, then he has the potential to kill the oldest church.

God's church will live on, however, no matter what, even if he forsakes some members of his church, and some parts of the church die off, as Jesus prophesized the gates of hell would not overcome God's church. As a believer, I have come to terms that my church may die.

That said, I will not watch silently as much Church is destroyed from within, on the contrary, I will speak like Jesus did against his religious "authorities" and denounce them as hypocrites and vipers if need be.

My plan is to be polite when bringing this subject up, but ask the difficult questions,

"Did not Bartholomew cause a schism? By whose authority could he defy another patriarch? This schism preceded a real war, and divided orthodox people against each other to the point of bloodshed. How then, is Bartholomew not responsible for causing a war through this schism?"

If I do not see honest responses, then my poor church does not have a chance, sadly. That said, I've known too many good souls inside my church - there is an extremely strong chance to reverse this decline before it is too late. Pray.
 
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