Impact on the Russian Orthodox Church in Western nations

Pavel

Robin
Orthodox
Hello,

There is a bit tension I could feel among parishioners. Today, our priest sent an email regarding the war and sort of explained his stand. I would like to share it here and know your opinion:

Dear Friends,

I have wanted to write to you for some time about the tragic situation in Ukraine and how it affects our church community. Many if not all of us are deeply shocked that a full-scale war is once again unfolding in Europe. Sadly there are, as ever, many conflicts going on in the world today, but inevitably we feel it more when it is so close to us, and especially when many of us have family and friends in the affected areas.

It is not my intention to discuss here the complex historical and political background to this war. Suffice it to say that it did not begin on February 24th of this year and that many people and countries have contributed to the present dramatic escalation of the conflict. What must be said clearly, however, is that war is a great sin, perhaps the greatest sin in so far as it leads us to reduce our fellow human beings, made in the image and likeness of God, to the abstract category of 'the enemy'. Particularly horrific is war between peoples who are related by ties of kinship, history and faith. In such cases the sin of Cain is exemplified all too clearly.

Sin cannot and must not be justified on any pretext whatsoever. We know this from our experience of struggling with and confessing our own sin, but it applies equally to the collective sin of war. In particular, it is unacceptable to use quasi-religious language for this purpose. Christian values cannot be defended by bombs and bullets. The attempt to do so is literally scandalous and can only bring our holy Orthodox Faith into disrepute.

Together with many other clergy and lay people, I am deeply disappointed by the explicit or tacit support for the invasion of Ukraine voiced by certain representatives of the Russian Orthodox Church, and the silence of others. Thank God, some have spoken out calmly but clearly, first among them His Eminence Metropolitan Onuphry of Kiev, a man of undeniable integrity and piety. His Eminence Metropolitan Jean of Dubna, head of the Archdiocese of Parishes of Russian Tradition in Western Europe, has also courageously requested His Holiness Patriarch Kirill to use whatever influence he may have to stop the bloodshed. Other hierarchs have also signalled their opposition to the war, as have many priests, lay people and theologians in various petitions and open letters. In no way can it be said that the Russian Orthodox Church as a whole supports the war.

Some of you have raised concerns to the effect that the commemoration of the Patriarch and the hierarchy at the services indicates our tacit support for the invasion of Ukraine. I wish to say very clearly that this is absolutely not true. The traditional liturgical commemoration of the church hierarchy is a statement of fact about how our local Eucharisitc community is connected to the wider Church. If you like, it is our ecclesiastical address: Diocese of Sourozh, Patriarchate of Moscow. Whilst it is indeed an important reminder that we are not Orthodox congregationalists and that our priest exercises his ministry only by the blessing and delegated authority of his bishop, who is a successor of the Apostles, in no way does it imply agreement with any position that the hierarchy might take in matters not directly connected with our salvation.

Dear brothers and sisters, in these difficult and tragic days, let us all strive to 'maintain the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace' (Eph 4:3). Let not our souls, darkened by passions, become 'the possession and food of the enemy' (Great Canon of St Andrew of Crete). We have work to do: to pray constantly for peace; to do what lies within our power to offer help and support to the refugees who are coming our way, and to build up our community so that it can be a place of sanctuary for all who are seeking the light of Christ in the darkness of the present age.

May the blessing of the Lord be upon all of us!

With love in Christ,
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
Hello,

There is a bit tension I could feel among parishioners. Today, our priest sent an email regarding the war and sort of explained his stand. I would like to share it here and know your opinion:

Dear Friends,

I have wanted to write to you for some time about the tragic situation in Ukraine and how it affects our church community. Many if not all of us are deeply shocked that a full-scale war is once again unfolding in Europe. Sadly there are, as ever, many conflicts going on in the world today, but inevitably we feel it more when it is so close to us, and especially when many of us have family and friends in the affected areas.

It is not my intention to discuss here the complex historical and political background to this war. Suffice it to say that it did not begin on February 24th of this year and that many people and countries have contributed to the present dramatic escalation of the conflict. What must be said clearly, however, is that war is a great sin, perhaps the greatest sin in so far as it leads us to reduce our fellow human beings, made in the image and likeness of God, to the abstract category of 'the enemy'. Particularly horrific is war between peoples who are related by ties of kinship, history and faith. In such cases the sin of Cain is exemplified all too clearly.

Sin cannot and must not be justified on any pretext whatsoever. We know this from our experience of struggling with and confessing our own sin, but it applies equally to the collective sin of war. In particular, it is unacceptable to use quasi-religious language for this purpose. Christian values cannot be defended by bombs and bullets. The attempt to do so is literally scandalous and can only bring our holy Orthodox Faith into disrepute.

Together with many other clergy and lay people, I am deeply disappointed by the explicit or tacit support for the invasion of Ukraine voiced by certain representatives of the Russian Orthodox Church, and the silence of others. Thank God, some have spoken out calmly but clearly, first among them His Eminence Metropolitan Onuphry of Kiev, a man of undeniable integrity and piety. His Eminence Metropolitan Jean of Dubna, head of the Archdiocese of Parishes of Russian Tradition in Western Europe, has also courageously requested His Holiness Patriarch Kirill to use whatever influence he may have to stop the bloodshed. Other hierarchs have also signalled their opposition to the war, as have many priests, lay people and theologians in various petitions and open letters. In no way can it be said that the Russian Orthodox Church as a whole supports the war.

Some of you have raised concerns to the effect that the commemoration of the Patriarch and the hierarchy at the services indicates our tacit support for the invasion of Ukraine. I wish to say very clearly that this is absolutely not true. The traditional liturgical commemoration of the church hierarchy is a statement of fact about how our local Eucharisitc community is connected to the wider Church. If you like, it is our ecclesiastical address: Diocese of Sourozh, Patriarchate of Moscow. Whilst it is indeed an important reminder that we are not Orthodox congregationalists and that our priest exercises his ministry only by the blessing and delegated authority of his bishop, who is a successor of the Apostles, in no way does it imply agreement with any position that the hierarchy might take in matters not directly connected with our salvation.

Dear brothers and sisters, in these difficult and tragic days, let us all strive to 'maintain the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace' (Eph 4:3). Let not our souls, darkened by passions, become 'the possession and food of the enemy' (Great Canon of St Andrew of Crete). We have work to do: to pray constantly for peace; to do what lies within our power to offer help and support to the refugees who are coming our way, and to build up our community so that it can be a place of sanctuary for all who are seeking the light of Christ in the darkness of the present age.

May the blessing of the Lord be upon all of us!

With love in Christ,
I understand this letter but I'd really like to hear a priest address the broader spiritual state of Ukraine leading up to the war. State sponsored homosexuality, Jewish and foreign leadership (in short I explained elsewhere that we Orthodox canonically cannot marry Jews, cannot eat their bread, and cannot receive medicine from them, but we can elect them our leaders without repercussion???), yoking themselves with the West and all its baggage, and perhaps most importantly the spiritual fratricide between the so-called Orthodox Churches in Ukraine, namely the UOC and the OCU where congregations have literally gone to war with each other.
 

Samseau

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
Sin cannot and must not be justified on any pretext whatsoever. We know this from our experience of struggling with and confessing our own sin, but it applies equally to the collective sin of war. In particular, it is unacceptable to use quasi-religious language for this purpose. Christian values cannot be defended by bombs and bullets. The attempt to do so is literally scandalous and can only bring our holy Orthodox Faith into disrepute.

This directly contradicts Christ. Matthew 10...

"34 Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. 35 For I have come to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. 36 And a person's enemies will be those of his own household."

Pacifism in all it's forms are heretical to the church. Violence is of course never wanted, and to be avoided at all costs, but ultimately cannot be avoided because Satan will bring the fight to you, even in your own house! And of course Christ became violent with the money-changers. Whether that violence is with a sword, whip, gun, or any other weapon is irrelevant, violence is violence.

Therefore condemning this war is always a matter of claiming to know who was acting in self-defense or not, which is quite difficult to do unless you have all the facts or are God. The proper thing this priest should have done was refrain from judging.

That said, I completely agree with praying for peace and an end to violence. War is to be avoided at all costs. But I cannot forget easily how badly the "Western free world" fanned the flames of war in Ukraine, nor can I forget the schism caused by Bartholomew, whom I've yet seen anyone yet dare to criticize at this point.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
nor can I forget the schism caused by Bartholomew, whom I've yet seen anyone yet dare to criticize at this point.
This is the elephant in the room right now like you said not being addressed by anyone. Could there possibly have been a more suspect timing of his recognition of the schismatics? I actually explained this situation to a mostly secular guy who doesn't go to church yet is redpilled and he couldn't believe the Ukrainian Church situation and the EP's ties to the state department are not being discussed in dissident circles or normie media.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Further to @Samseau's posts above

Link
I'm inquiring at this church. Went there a few weeks ago for a Divine Liturgy and it was a very good experience. It's too bad they feel they have to take these steps now. They were in a media hype as well the last days, being covered in major MSN outlets, in what I gathered a sort of a witch hunt as you can imagine from the secular media. The step to inquire with Barthelomew appears to be a big one as I read he's not a popular figure in conservative Orthodox circles, to say the least. I will see how the situation develops but it's sad to see Orthodox churches go through this.
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member

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YouTube blocks Russian Orthodox channel Spas​

One of the most popular Russian Orthodox channels has been blocked by YouTube.

Spas, the premier Orthodox TV station in Russia, had more than a million subscribers to its YouTube channel when it was blocked by the video hosting site earlier this week.

The station is instead developing its channel on the domestic site Rutube. In addition to adding new videos, they are working on uploading all archival videos.

Spas also has a presence on a number of social media platforms.

Russia’s Federal Service for Supervision of Communications, Information Technology and Mass Media (Roskomnadzor) is demanding that Google LLC remove the restrictions imposed on Spas as soon as possible and explain the reasons for the ban in the first place.

“The agency considers unacceptable any restrictions on any Russian media, and especially those that contribute to the formation of a worldview based on Orthodox values, the development and strengthening of the spiritual and moral foundations of the Russian state,” Roskomnadzor said in a statement.
 

Stoyan

Pelican
Orthodox
Look at all the glowing praise the chews heap onto Black Bart, in the trash rag the guardian, what further proof do you need this man has sold his soul to Satan? They call him the spiritual leader, but to whom does he lead? Constantinople only has a single parish under it's control. They try to equate him to the Pope, when of course every Patriarch is equal to one another and there aren't any Popes within the Orthodox Church.

If Black Bart, and the people he represents inside of the Orthodox Church, are not stopped, then we will see rainbow flag outside of Orthodox churches someday. The same for Catholics with their antichrist Pope. If he's been chosen by the chews, then he has the potential to kill the oldest church.

"Did not Bartholomew cause a schism? By whose authority could he defy another patriarch? This schism preceded a real war, and divided orthodox people against each other to the point of bloodshed. How then, is Bartholomew not responsible for causing a war through this schism?"
This is interesting. Can you please give more information about "Black Bart", who is he and what does he do, what is he known for?
 
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