International travel in light of the coronavirus

Blade Runner

Woodpecker
I had hinted at a dedicated thread as an offshoot from Coronavirus Economic, Cultural, Political Ramifications to specifically discuss the ability to travel, what may be newly required by countries of origin or destination, the economic costs and degree to which travel volume changes, and the ultimate effect on particular countries or regions.

As a point of departure, here are several questions that come to mind:

  • Will an additional "passport" be required, related to current or past medical history?
  • Has the economics already changed that suggests an even smaller number of carriers will provide passage to destination X? Will increased costs, monetary and otherwise, decrease travel to destination Y? Will this result in a re-balancing of traffic to various locations so as to have an effect of reversing recent cultural changes owing to increased attention and tourist money/spending?
  • Is nationalism accelerated by this phenomenon, from a protective point and/or a hunkering down due to the world economic decline?
  • Is recency bias accounting for current and future fears, and nothing will end up really changing?
 

Hindu Man

Sparrow
Southern Europe (Spain, Italy and Greece) is so desperate for tourist money, they have opened up to international travelers beginning next month and July. I don't know about you but I would not go on a trip to Greece and put myself at risk--just to help their economy.


 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
I'm planning on heading over to Europe in June, or July at the latest.

Lockdown is useless. What good is it when there are probably 50 million people who have had it.

People are meeting all over the place.


My guess is lockdown will largely serve to delay the spread.
 
Good topic. Currently I can't even leave Australia because they banned leaving. Even getting domestic flights are very hard now with barely any flights happening.

I honestly thought they wouldn't be able to keep this going for more than 3 months but it looks like they want to keep it going.

I think all nations are waiting for someone else to open their borders first. Nobody wants to be first, especially Australia. I was watching YouTube and this ex hedgefund guy was saying another 3 more months of banned air travel will bankrupt many countries so it would make sense if they caved and opened up their borders soon. I certainly don't want to be stuck here.
 

Mercury

Newbie
You are seeing the massive decline of globalism and with it international travel is about to become a lot more difficult. Just look at the consolidation in the airline industry- less players and especially with low cost carriers getting out of the way after the current lull prices will skyrocket.
 

Blade Runner

Woodpecker
You are seeing the massive decline of globalism and with it international travel is about to become a lot more difficult. Just look at the consolidation in the airline industry- less players and especially with low cost carriers getting out of the way after the current lull prices will skyrocket.
I would have guessed this sentiment might arise. It was, in fact, my default assumption when I created the thread.

Will this result in a re-balancing of traffic to various locations so as to have an effect of reversing recent cultural changes owing to increased attention and tourist money/spending?
Perhaps this might be the most important question of all, for those who are interested in traveling and were increasingly turned off by the globalism that had set in. Will there be a reversal?
 
I'm in Sydney, Australia and the general vibe from the media is that international travel won't come back for years...
I heard the prime minister saying he can't see any international travel until middle of 2021 but, of course, he has to say that. There was some talk about opening travel between AUS and NZ before international travel but I never want to go there.

source: https://www.sbs.com.au/language/eng...ytime-soon-says-prime-minister-scott-morrison

What's upsetting is while Australians cannot travel anywhere the priority is to let international student to travel into Australia toward the end of July. All this talk about safety and this is what they actually plan on doing, what a joke.

source 1 : https://thepienews.com/news/australia-to-consider-july-entry-for-international-students/

source 2: https://www.sbs.com.au/news/scott-m...en-australia-by-july-after-coronavirus-crisis
 

Hindu Man

Sparrow
I do think so... "international travel won't come back for years..." #coronavirus #COVID-19
On a positive note, it may decrease the usage of pretentious users on Instagram who post about their exciting lives, while "traveling around the world". Same thing with YouTubers. Speaking of YouTubers, everyone has a YouTube channel now, huh?
 

CynicalContrarian

Peacock
Gold Member
I'm in Sydney, Australia and the general vibe from the media is that international travel won't come back for years...
I heard the prime minister saying he can't see any international travel until middle of 2021 but, of course, he has to say that. There was some talk about opening travel between AUS and NZ before international travel but I never want to go there.
...

Heard it said, the Aus. Border Force crowd have 2023 in mind.
Yet NZ aside, some time in 2021 is probably the more reasonable bet.

Until the hotspots like Brazil & Russia die down, there'll always be some place they can point to & say - "Not safe!"
 

hedonist

Woodpecker
On a positive note, it may decrease the usage of pretentious users on Instagram who post about their exciting lives, while "traveling around the world". Same thing with YouTubers. Speaking of YouTubers, everyone has a YouTube channel now, huh?

Actually no....the cunts are recycling their pictures to the max to pretend they are still living the lifestyle. I know one girl who turned a 2 week vacation into 3 years...she must have had 6 suitcases for all the outfits...
 

budoslavic

Peacock
Gold Member
This is truly frightening. I don't want to imagine the world 5 years from now.
It gets worse, Roosh. Check out this tweet from last June.


That Travel/CovidPass video is part of the Great Reset agenda.

There are many reasons to pursue a Great Reset, but the most urgent is COVID-19. Having already led to hundreds of thousands of deaths, the pandemic represents one of the worst public-health crises in recent history. And, with casualties still mounting in many parts of the world, it is far from over.
The Great Reset agenda would have three main components. The first would steer the market toward fairer outcomes. To this end, governments should improve coordination (for example, in tax, regulatory, and fiscal policy), upgrade trade arrangements, and create the conditions for a “stakeholder economy.” At a time of diminishing tax bases and soaring public debt, governments have a powerful incentive to pursue such action.

Moreover, governments should implement long-overdue reforms that promote more equitable outcomes. Depending on the country, these may include changes to wealth taxes, the withdrawal of fossil-fuel subsidies, and new rules governing intellectual property, trade, and competition.

The second component of a Great Reset agenda would ensure that investments advance shared goals, such as equality and sustainability. Here, the large-scale spending programs that many governments are implementing represent a major opportunity for progress. The European Commission, for one, has unveiled plans for a €750 billion ($826 billion) recovery fund. The US, China, and Japan also have ambitious economic-stimulus plans.

Rather than using these funds, as well as investments from private entities and pension funds, to fill cracks in the old system, we should use them to create a new one that is more resilient, equitable, and sustainable in the long run. This means, for example, building “green” urban infrastructure and creating incentives for industries to improve their track record on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) metrics.

The third and final priority of a Great Reset agenda is to harness the innovations of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to support the public good, especially by addressing health and social challenges. During the COVID-19 crisis, companies, universities, and others have joined forces to develop diagnostics, therapeutics, and possible vaccines; establish testing centers; create mechanisms for tracing infections; and deliver telemedicine. Imagine what could be possible if similar concerted efforts were made in every sector.
 
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