International travel in light of the coronavirus

aynrus

 
Banned
I believe that air travel for the middle class (and lower) has its days numbered. In the next world, in the new world order, oligarchs will no longer allow commoners to travel by plane.
They will create so many restrictions that it will become increasingly impossible to travel through airports.

Well that's exactly what Russian government spokeswoman Maria Zakharova publicly said back during the first weeks of fake virus scamdemic.
She said, basically, that dirty plebs started to travel way too much and only well-to-do people should be able to fly overseas.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm curious, how do you guys view traveling in light of the cojonavirus especially in relation to your turning to Christ (or you as a Christian if you've been on that journey longer)? Personally I feel like I'm not even interested to step on an airplane anymore. First of all, the cojona clown world measures everywhere, face masks etc, sometimes on the street also like Latin-America. Add to that the test requirement to even go there and probably the walls you'll hit without the vaxx/regular testing on the ground, although in more informal economies this might not be too much enforced, same as for example restaurant entry in Europe right now, and the impending lockdowns and intensification of measures that can happen any time. Second, I've been thinking about the necessity of travel. I've traveled a lot and am very grateful for that, Rome/Istanbul places like that were fantastic, but often it were just hedonistic journeys. I thought about Christian people some centuries ago, were they traveling? They were almost always at home, in their domain, with their family, maybe eating at family/friends every now and then or getting them as guests, and once or twice going to a restaurant/theater or something like that, which would've been a big event for a normal Christian family. What then are we looking for in travel? Is it in general not a waste of time, ''getting away from it all'', running away to ''find yourself'' or ''find meaning in another place'' where ''the grass is greener''. Getting experience, things like that. I really feel that it's a secular habit to gain as much pleasure and ''experience'' out of the world as this is all we have. Without that unnecessary travel, with a focus on our local community and enjoying a day out in our local nature, a local beach, a local park, wouldn't life be much more peaceful? I certainly think it will, hence the fact that traveling is and most likely will remain very unpleasant, especially as the vax passes gain momentum and the cojona measures are kept in place or strengthened, may not be too bad for our overal journey as people towards a peaceful life.
 
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Padouk

 
Banned
Non-Christian
I'm curious, how do you guys view traveling in light of the cojonavirus especially in relation to your turning to Christ (or you as a Christian if you've been on that journey longer)? Personally I feel like I'm not even interested to step on an airplane anymore. First of all, the cojona clown world measures everywhere, face masks etc, sometimes on the street also like Latin-America. Add to that the test requirement to even go there and probably the walls you'll hit without the vaxx/regular testing on the ground, although in more informal economies this might not be too much enforced, same as for example restaurant entry in Europe right now. Second, I've been thinking about the necessity of travel. I've traveled a lot and am very grateful for that, Rome/Istanbul places like that were fantastic, but often it were just hedonistic journeys. I thought about Christian people some centuries ago, were they traveling? They were almost always at home, in their domain, with their family, maybe eating at family/friends every now and then or getting them as guests, and once or twice going to a restaurant/theater or something like that, which would've been a big event for a normal Christian family. What then are we looking for in travel? Is it in general not a waste of time, ''getting away from it all'', running away to ''find yourself'' or ''find meaning in another place'' where ''the grass is greener''. Getting experience, things like that. I really feel that it's a secular habit to gain as much pleasure and ''experience'' out of the world as this is all we have. Without that unnecessary travel, with a focus on our local community and enjoying a day out in our local nature, a local beach, a local park, wouldn't life be much more peaceful? I certainly think it will, hence the fact that traveling is and most likely will remain very unpleasant, especially as the vax passes gain momentum and the cojona measures are kept in place or strengthened, may not be too bad for our overal journey as people towards a peaceful life.

Travelling is a roller-coaster experience as it's stimulates certain hormones and hence why we experience the post-travel mini-depression. It is why it's also addictive. All the youtube travel bloggers look very infantile to me.

Having said that I would love to be an old-fashion nomad looking for greener pastures and living in a tent with minimum stuff.
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member



Does it apply to the migrants in Del Rio? :boring:

E_p59c5XMAYZaWP
 

rockoman

Woodpecker
I'm curious, how do you guys view traveling in light of the cojonavirus especially in relation to your turning to Christ (or you as a Christian if you've been on that journey longer)? Personally I feel like I'm not even interested to step on an airplane anymore. First of all, the cojona clown world measures everywhere, face masks etc, sometimes on the street also like Latin-America. Add to that the test requirement to even go there and probably the walls you'll hit without the vaxx/regular testing on the ground, although in more informal economies this might not be too much enforced, same as for example restaurant entry in Europe right now, and the impending lockdowns and intensification of measures that can happen any time. Second, I've been thinking about the necessity of travel. I've traveled a lot and am very grateful for that, Rome/Istanbul places like that were fantastic, but often it were just hedonistic journeys. I thought about Christian people some centuries ago, were they traveling? They were almost always at home, in their domain, with their family, maybe eating at family/friends every now and then or getting them as guests, and once or twice going to a restaurant/theater or something like that, which would've been a big event for a normal Christian family. What then are we looking for in travel? Is it in general not a waste of time, ''getting away from it all'', running away to ''find yourself'' or ''find meaning in another place'' where ''the grass is greener''. Getting experience, things like that. I really feel that it's a secular habit to gain as much pleasure and ''experience'' out of the world as this is all we have. Without that unnecessary travel, with a focus on our local community and enjoying a day out in our local nature, a local beach, a local park, wouldn't life be much more peaceful? I certainly think it will, hence the fact that traveling is and most likely will remain very unpleasant, especially as the vax passes gain momentum and the cojona measures are kept in place or strengthened, may not be too bad for our overal journey as people towards a peaceful life.
Pilgrimages have always been a feature of Christian practice.
 

brimby

Sparrow
Orthodox
I see Vietnam has opened up. Anyone on the ground can give any update on the situation in country? any vax pass, mask enforcement etc?
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
Have had a mixed experience in the Caribbean - one island was fantastic, mostly untouched by the measures, another at times depressing - only locals around very few tourists.

The point about the latter, and to some extent even both of them is that the unvaccinated are fully permitted to travel to them, but tourism is enormously reduced.

Normies are simply detered from travelling even if they are allowed to! It's sad because it means that the destinations even when they are fully open can be lacking in vibrancy. Very thin on the ground, hit and miss.

They have just scared people, and the continuing message is "stay home, stay safe", I really wish there was more of a counter-message of "see the world, travel, get out of your house".

I spent around €170 for two nose-poking tests on this trip - one before leaving Europe for one of the islands, then when going between them. That may deter some people but I believe the #1 travel fear of the normie is that they may be "detained" by unexpected rule changes or accidental non-compliance, perhaps with their children. Locked somewhere in a hotel room for quaranting, or prevented for an undetermined time period from returning. People are just not the same anymore, like confort and security, uninterested in freedom and adventure.
 

JohnQThomas

Woodpecker
Other Christian
Have had a mixed experience in the Caribbean - one island was fantastic, mostly untouched by the measures, another at times depressing - only locals around very few tourists.

The point about the latter, and to some extent even both of them is that the unvaccinated are fully permitted to travel to them, but tourism is enormously reduced.

Normies are simply detered from travelling even if they are allowed to! It's sad because it means that the destinations even when they are fully open can be lacking in vibrancy. Very thin on the ground, hit and miss.
Mostly locals, very few other tourists? People are “thin on the ground”?

Sounds like a great time to travel and avoid the usual crowds—if you’re so inclined, and have the time and money. Maybe take the kids to see parts of the world that are different from their hometown, before every place becomes like every other place.
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
Mostly locals, very few other tourists? People are “thin on the ground”?

Sounds like a great time to travel and avoid the usual crowds—if you’re so inclined, and have the time and money. Maybe take the kids to see parts of the world that are different from their hometown, before every place becomes like every other place.
Some people are doing just that, there are families out and about. To be fair, this trip has been more "hit" than "miss" despite my complaining. Just remembering a few nights ago, a river-side venue was packed with people, karaoke being belted out accross the water :)

It must be on the mend, even the media in the Caribbean is sending a message of opening up and normality, just that you can't realistically expect it to go from fear-mongering globalist madness to pre-pandemic normality overnight.

I might as well mention a funny anecdote from a few weeks ago - I took the odd taxi on the other island. Late one night after a rock concert I wanted to go back home about 3.5km away. So flagged a cab van and asked him how much. He said US$20, which was about $5 too much but anyway I started to climb in. He said "Have you got a mask?" so I said "Forget it!". Was a black guy as all the cab drivers are there, with his girlfriend. He said "okay, you can go without a mask for $20". So I went to get in without a mask and he proceeded to attempt to try to spray me with antibac at which point I yelled again "Forget it!" and ran through the darkness in partial rain, past barking dogs.. Lots of fear and I think those two were actually scared of the virus, not just of the government.

Actually, once I got on one of the local buses and they were about to kick me off for not having a mask. I had forgotten it, usually carry one for the occasions that it comes to this. ..well, I know this is gross, but there was a clean looking mask which someone had forgotten on a seat. I am not a germ phobe, but none the less, the pseudo-pandemic leads some of us to take even more risks than usual - running through darkness in a foreign country, putting on masks and risking catching other people's diseases other than covid.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
Man I wish the US would follow and remove these insane requirements. I want to move to the US once the pandemic is over and visit my father in law.
If you are a US citizen or legal resident then you can travel to and stay the US now. If you are not then you cant and wont be able to regardless of Covid restrictions

How do plan to acquire residency in the US?
 

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
If you are a US citizen or legal resident then you can travel to and stay the US now. If you are not then you cant and wont be able to regardless of Covid restrictions

How do plan to acquire residency in the US?
Only after being swabbed and successfully passing a covid test with a high false positive rate. I'm not traveling as long as my country puts conditions on my re-entry to my own home. Also as posted above, visitors to the US also need proof of jabbing.

I'm hoping the restrictions are lifted in April, when they are currently set to expire.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
Only after being swabbed and successfully passing a covid test with a high false positive rate. I'm not traveling as long as my country puts conditions on my re-entry to my own home. Also as posted above, visitors to the US also need proof of jabbing.

I'm hoping the restrictions are lifted in April, when they are currently set to expire.
Ive exited and reentered the US several time during the scamdemic without having to actually do a test. Its the airlines check in agents that are the literal ”Covid gatekeepers “ (not any govt agency ie USCIS) and their level of bio security is lax to say the least. If youre a US citizen no one can prevent you from repatriation
 

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Glad to hear it, and probably the agents abroad are more normal people, but I have encountered too many Nazis working at domestic airports. Years ago I remember one yelling at me because I asked her where luggage lost and found was because luggage lockers had been removed because terist and I needed to leave my luggage for a few hours there.

So I'm not going to risk it. I agree it's black letter law citizens cannot be denied entry into their own country but the US is openly breaking this law (they have a weasel word explanation of it on the Dept of State website that explains what you said -- it's the airlines doing it). Which is just like the "we are not censoring you, it's a private company doing it" scheme.
 

Brebelle3

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I see Vietnam has opened up. Anyone on the ground can give any update on the situation in country? any vax pass, mask enforcement etc?
Negative test only brother. You can even do your test in Vietnam within 24 hours. Gotta download their tracing app for compliance.

Most indoor places will require a mask, but I politely tell them no thank you and they usually don't bother me.

My family is there now and I haven't been with them since June. I'm praying for discernment on whether to head back immediately, as I'm caring for my dad. Though the thought of kissing my boy is overwhelming.

Good luck

 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Negative test only brother. You can even do your test in Vietnam within 24 hours. Gotta download their tracing app for compliance.

Most indoor places will require a mask, but I politely tell them no thank you and they usually don't bother me.

My family is there now and I haven't been with them since June. I'm praying for discernment on whether to head back immediately, as I'm caring for my dad. Though the thought of kissing my boy is overwhelming.

Good luck

Good, I've got a month off in 2 months and Vietnam's on the list to go to, so I'll keep an eye on the situation. The link doesn't work, but can you confirm there is no vaccine requirements to enter venues/vaccine pass?
 
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