Is a University Degree worth it?

This question is for all men with all different ages, education and outlooks.

Is a University Degree worth the 4+ years of:

Cons:
-Increasingly online instruction(except labs/practical)
-Being on a Liberal Campus with low critical thinking and low tolerance for challenging ideas.
-The potential student debt (50k+ easily and more)

Pros:
-Letters behind your name
-White collar, better treatment than blue collar workers
-Higher avg. wages than with no degree

There are of course many variables here, feel free to list more pros and cons.
 

Amwolf

Sparrow
I believe that there's no simple answer to this question as there are too many of variables. If you're going to enroll in STEM, then studying in the United States is worth it. But remember that whites are being shunned for many of these jobs in favor for those with H-1B1s. However, there are still many of good opportunities out there for those with a background in STEM -- especially from a Tier 1 university. For anything else, including business, social sciences, etc., I'd recommend looking to study in Russia or Asia. There are several reputable universities in Russia that offer world-class business and IT programs that cost a fraction of schools in the West -- especially the United States.

Also, the trades look very promising and there's a shortage of qualified workers. While lacking in "prestige", at least you'll have a good career that's always going to be in demand as you provide an essential service.
 

DanielH

Woodpecker
Unless you're getting a full ride or close to it and it's in STEM, don't do it. With that in mind, DO NOT do ROTC, you may want to start a family or at least find a decent woman before you're 26.

And if you do go, remember to continue going to church. It is a spiritual war as much as an academic struggle.
 
I did it and I don't regret it.. but I went to cheap schools and graduated with less than $20k in debt (I did work some while studying) with a worthwhile degree. I enjoyed school more than working, but now I have a better job than I would otherwise have.

I personally don't like online classes, but if I could do it again I probably would have used it as an opportunity to travel more and do my classes from elsewhere.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
This question is for all men with all different ages, education and outlooks.

Is a University Degree worth the 4+ years of:

Cons:
-Increasingly online instruction(except labs/practical)
-Being on a Liberal Campus with low critical thinking and low tolerance for challenging ideas.
-The potential student debt (50k+ easily and more)

Pros:
-Letters behind your name
-White collar, better treatment than blue collar workers
-Higher avg. wages than with no degree

There are of course many variables here, feel free to list more pros and cons.
You don't need a degree if you're smart.
 

Blade Runner

Kingfisher
Suggest reading "Worthless" by Aaron Cleary.
He had that figured out nicely
What's funny is that I've met and spoken at length with Aaron; nice guy. Maybe funnier is that I did youtube search (your posting of his name rang a bell) and found that he recently did a video with Rollo Tomassi, lol, that guy looks OLD in his podcast/video with Aaron talking about the economics of the "Sexual Marketplace". It's interesting because this idea they treat there is a very good one not often developed ... Aaron speaks on the "Simp Economy" ruining the natural sexual marketplace.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
This isn't a yes or no answer.

Only in certain fields - Medicine, Law, Engineering, etc.

You need to tie the degree directly to a well paid, in demand job at the end of it. Consider starting salary as well as career peak. Figure that part out. Also, try to align it with something you have an interest in / natural flair for. If yes, then it's worth it.

The rest (50%+) are a mostly a waste of time and money. It's just a party to avoid the real world for a few years or to enjoy the satisfaction of learning something.

Extreme example - 7+ years of studying to become a Psychologist to earn $45k when you just be a counsellor (or life coach) if it really was your life dream to help people in this way.

You can do an IT degree in 3 years and earn that day 1 after graduation (or even a few recognised and sought after certifications + industry experience), and then get to six figures within 5-7 years.
 
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paninaro

Kingfisher
It depends a lot on what you study. A degree in "gender studies" is useless even if tuition was free.

One thing to consider is the value of the network you make. At the right school, you're going to be surround by smart people and real go-getters. These people are going to be successful, and it helps to have those kind of friends. It's nice to be able to show up in a city, look up an old college buddy and go out for a drink, and find out he's now CEO or VP of some successful company.
 
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints/Mormons, have an online educational program open to both members and non-members, where you can get an accredited and *extremely* affordable university bachelor's degree. Majors are limited in number, but range from business, liberal arts, to even technology. The price depends on where you live, to make it affordable for almost everyone. I'm very proud of the Mormon Church for creating this program that can change lives...

Certificates and degrees available...


Tuition by nation...


Tell me what you think...
 
Start at your Target and work backwards to find your answer:

As an Example:
-Target: I want respect, to start a family, contribute to society in a positive way, and be financially stable.
-Options: Businessman, Doctor, Bestselling Author, Bridge-Builder etc...
-Selection: I choose Doctor (due to my interest in X and Y and my natural work ethic, desire to help others etc)
-Do I need a degree?: Yes, to attend medical school, I need a Bachelor's Degree/enough credits and score high on the MCAT.
-What kind of degree is best?: Biology, Chemistry, Biomed Etc...
-What school?: I want a largely Conservative School with a good pre-med program (Southern US)
-Where?: Auburn University, Alabama.
-Am I competitive/can I afford it?: Yes, if no, find ways to become competitive/afford it.
-Am I willing to get into debt/dedicate a lot of time and energy into this and see it through: Yes
-Answer: The 4-year university degree is worth it, in this case.

Work Target-Back to solve most of life's problems.
 
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homersheineken

Woodpecker
Start at your Target and work backwards to find your answer:

As an Example:
-Target: I want respect, to start a family, contribute to society in a positive way, and be financially stable.
-Options: Businessman, Doctor, Bestselling Author, Bridge-Builder etc...
-Selection: I choose Doctor (due to my interest in X and Y and my natural work ethic, desire to help others etc)
-Do I need a degree?: Yes, to attend medical school, I need a Bachelor's Degree/enough credits and score high on the MCAT.
-What kind of degree is best?: Biology, Chemistry, Biomed Etc...
-What school?: I want a largely Conservative School with a good pre-med program (Southern US)
-Where?: Auburn University, Alabama.
-Am I competitive/can I afford it?: Yes, if no, find ways to become competitive/afford it.
-Am I willing to get into debt/dedicate a lot of time and energy into this and see it through: Yes
-Answer: The 4-year university degree is worth it, in this case.

Work Target-Back to solve most of life's problems.
You capitalized Target so I as thinking Target as I read it.

Totally different meaning there :D
 

JiggyLordJr

Woodpecker
Yes, but only you study STEM or go to a top business school. I am currently in my last semester getting a degree from a third tier school in NYC.

The greatest value I gained from uni was the social aspects (meeting new friends), the women (only the international girls), and the sense of professionalism born from a series of white collar internships.

If I went to school online I would have reaped none of those benefits.

That said, If you do college right you can come out the other side making well into 6 figures.

A few tips:

- Know what program you want to pursue before you enroll. If it’s not profitable, don’t study it.
- Don’t enroll in some random uni in bumfuck nowhere. Most students in these places turn to drugs/alcohol within a year of enrollment. Great example would be a second tier city like Binghamton, NY. Avoid rural colleges at all cost.
- 3 years are spent on filler classes taught by tenured boomer professors, with 1 year max spent on major classes (the profitable stuff, remember?). Better solution: Transfer in credits from an cheap online uni like Excelsior to skip the bs and save some $.
- College has gotten worse than when I started 5 years ago. The school-wide newsletter that used to inform of things-a-happening on campus is now filled with links to anti-white, pro-BIPOC pieces by Marxist Professors/Admins. I’ve stopped reading the newsletter entirely.
- If you keep your head down and study hard, you’ll come out the other side very employable. It’s a simple equation, and most of the Chinese students follow this to a T. They also tend to get great jobs post graduation.

:hmm:

I’ll end with this... If possible, study in a high IQ country. The best experience I had was an exchange semester in Asia. The schoolwork was much, much harder than in the US and there was a significantly larger courseload, across all classes. That said, I learned a shitton that year, and it made me appreciate the diligent work ethic that many Asians subscribe to. Access to feminine women as a bonus.

Think long and hard, my friend.
 

Stats

Robin
There was a large study done a few years ago that showed that only STEM comes close to being profitable and then only if you go to MIT or caltec does the degree really pay off significantly over a lifetime.

Tho uni can be fun. kind of like summer camp.
 

FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
I'd argue that there isn't a single field that's worth going to a University. 4 years is a massive opportunity cost to put up with the social and political environment in the average University. If you don't have the chutzpah to learn things on your own, hustle, network, make friends outside of school, you're not going to make it in the 2020s - regardless of going to school. The world has changed, college is too expensive and too politicized. You've got to be creative, and the University is a bad deal -- especially if you're putting on debt to attend. Not to mention, the University changes you for the worst. Don't endorse it by attending. If you're insecure about having a degree, community college is a low risk choice.

I agree on STEM, but it isn't one thing, it's a number of career paths that require varying education levels.

Science: Scientific research is very low pay. This is H1B dominated. Medicine is very high debt for most fields except 2 year degree nursing assistants.
Technology: Meaning software engineering and allied IT fields, high pay. You don't need a degree for this. A bootcamp is probably good enough, or maybe a 2 year degree if its a decent program just to get your foot in somewhere. A lot of computer science grads complain their studies didn't match real world skills. Indeed, I work alongside these folks every day.
Engineering: Other engineering fields are a mixed bag. Civil engineering, nope. Electrical engineering, yes. Petrol engineering, yes. Aero engineer, yes. Chemical engineer, maybe -- but usually petrol is a better bet. Engineering in general (including software) is the only thing worth going to college for. But note, you'll be so busy with your college studies you probably won't enjoy it as much.
Math: Math majors are about as useful as philosophy majors, so unless you go out of your way to use it for something business-related, no.

If you get a full ride to Stanford, go. I don't think I'd judge someone who made that choice. That's not most of us though. 2nd or 3rd tier school? Waste of time. Even a top tier school, if you're really that smart you probably don't need to go.

Note that @JiggyLordJr's 100k salary out of college: Most people aren't making 100k out of college, even in STEM they're not making more than 70k in a median income city. 100k+ is more likely than not the salary they'd earn in SF or NYC in finance (Wall Street) or from a really good tech program. It's not that much money in those places, honestly. Even MDs coming into internships may make 60 or 70k in NYC, which is nothing considering their debt load.

Also wanted to say, making plans when you're 19 or 20 to do this or that career 5 years into the future. Bad call.
College is an overinvestment for that reason. You can't plan your adult life when you're 19, you don't know anything. No wisdom.
If late 30s me could go back to that moment I decided to go to college, I'd tell myself "nope, skip that shit".
 
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