Is Autism real or fake?

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
My very simplified take on this is that autism is very real - but like other conditions that are not well understood (by the masses, anyway), it is often capitalized on (directly or indirectly) or used as a "device" for directing social change, and often according to an (((agenda))). Lots of mis-diagnosis, over-diagnosis, etc. I mean... it's not the most sensitive thing to say, but there are a lot of kids these days branded as "autistic" who would have, once upon a time, been accurately labeled as retarded. Words and definitions are shifty things, even and especially medical ones.

I could absolutely see the "rise in autism" being largely due to the adoption of the label as a catch-all by grifters, AND/OR being a convenient cover story for a truth that would result in powerful people, government, etc. being held criminally liable if exposed (known environmental toxins, water/food contamination, etc.)

At any rate, I don't believe the "rise in autism" is (just) due to women having children in their 40's, as that has always been pretty normal. Granted, a 40 year old woman a few generations ago would more likely be on her fifth or sixth baby than her first - before birth control came around and became commonplace, plenty of women were still having children by 35-40, even 45-50 wasn't super rare (though perhaps notable), even if they got started much younger.

I've had lots of people tell me I'm probably autistic, or straight up call me autistic (but in an affectionate way), and I've gotta admit they could be right! I know I have at least one genetic condition (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome), which I've kind of suspected for a while and is now more recently, apparently, known to be associated with an increased prevalence of autism, and it would explain a LOT. But I'm not interested in being evaluated or anything like that. If I am autistic, then I'm high-functioning enough to shamelessly upgrade to "eccentric" instead.

My gut tells me it's something like: genetic factors render individual sensitive or hypersensitive to certain common elements/substances, to the extent that if exposed during critical stage of development, permanent damage occurs and causes abnormal neurological development. Having learned what I've learned about my own condition and just how much variation is possible in terms of the most basic building blocks of EVERYTHING, I find this idea pretty compelling. I don't suspect we will ever pin down one "source" of autism, because I suspect it is more or less the fallout of a particular kind of damage which could be caused by any number of different things in different people (with the primary factor being that the damage occurs very early in development - possibly even during gestation for some children).

I'm not a doctor though; I've never even stayed at a Holiday Inn Express.
 
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Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
@SchoolApple - you say autism seems fake, and I can actually really relate to that feeling.

I notice also that you've replied to a lot of threads all in a flurry yesterday, with a lot of concise and relevant information!

Are you sure you yourself are not autistic?

I'm torn and can't decide between "maybe autist?" and "definitely bot."

Like this post if you are a bot. :blush:;):sneaky: lol
 

SchoolApple

Sparrow
Woman
@SchoolApple - you say autism seems fake, and I can actually really relate to that feeling.

I notice also that you've replied to a lot of threads all in a flurry yesterday, with a lot of concise and relevant information!

Are you sure you yourself are not autistic?

I'm torn and can't decide between "maybe autist?" and "definitely bot."

Like this post if you are a bot. :blush:;):sneaky: lol
Are you attacking me ?
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
Are you attacking me ?
No. Questioning the purpose and intention of your engagement here based on a very odd pattern and overall composition of posting, yes.

I've already given you a very thoughtful and personal response in good faith, even though you brought nothing to the table in the original post.

You've contributed "Sorry for angering people. I have no opinions about autism except that it seems made up." - which you pretty much have to be an autist to not understand is the most inflammatory and inept way to approach the subject.


What are you ANGLING FOR here?
 

SchoolApple

Sparrow
Woman
No. Questioning the purpose and intention of your engagement here based on a very odd pattern and overall composition of posting, yes.

I've already given you a very thoughtful and personal response in good faith, even though you brought nothing to the table in the original post.

You've contributed "Sorry for angering people. I have no opinions about autism except that it seems made up." - which you pretty much have to be an autist to not understand is the most inflammatory and inept way to approach the subject.


What are you ANGLING FOR here?
I posted a question. It had zero emotionalism for me. Personally, I was hoping for a real discussion without two women already attacking me in a supposedly Christian forum. I personally think that the autism thing is a way to excuse bad behaviour, and could even be completely made up. I have zero interest in offending, high interest in reading informed opinions. I have zero interest in emotional pissing contests. In other words, I am bored and overly censored and looking for a decent place on the internet to rest my head. Nothing more. Do you think I posted my question so that I could get into an ego battle with you and your buddy? How many others have been scared off? This forum has six active users, were the others scared off by easily offended people incapable of discussion? I'm not here to make enemies, that's why I hit ignore on your friend and why I will hit ignore on you too. I'm here to discuss issues when I have leisure time.
 
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Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
What exactly seems fake to you? And also, are you referring to high-functioning autism aka Asperger's? Or are you referring to stereotypical autism (like the movie Rain Man)?

Bouncing off Kitty's comment that kids back in the day simply would have been called "retarded", (a la Rain Man), high-functioning kids were often simply called "gifted"... particularly girls. This was my experience.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I posted a question. It had zero emotionalism for me. Personally, I was hoping for a real discussion without two women already attacking me in a supposedly Christian forum. I personally think that the autism thing is a way to excuse bad behaviour, and could even be completely made up. I have zero interest in offending, high interest in reading informed opinions. I have zero interest in emotional pissing contests. In other words, I am bored and overly censored and looking for a decent place on the internet to rest my head. Nothing more. Do you think I posted my question so that I could get into an ego battle with you and your buddy? How many others have been scared off? This forum has six active users, were the others scared off by easily offended people incapable of discussion? I'm not here to make enemies, that's why I hit ignore on your friend and why I will hit ignore on you too. I'm here to discuss issues when I have leisure time.
I apologize if you feel attacked. “Autism is made up” is a strong position to take without anything but your opinion to back up your reasoning. People will react to that stance. Challenging your reasoning and opinion and not agreeing with you is not attacking. Trying to engage in a deeper discussion beyond “autism is fake why don’t you all agree with me” is not attacking.
 

FrancisK

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Autism as in someone has a brain disorder.....yes that's real it's just a different labeling for a type of mental retardation.


Autism as in your child needs special coddling because they have no social skills, no discipline and can't function socially in anything past a video game chat? No I don't believe in that, it may sound crude but I think it's used a lot as a crutch.

I think it's an excuse for parents that simply raised bad kids. But my experience with autism is limited, mainly parents with terribly behaving kids who don't want to believe they simply raised bad kids and want to blame it on "autism". Although I do know parents who have kids labeled with "autism" and they are not bad kids at all, those ones I do believe simply have a disorder.

My last experience was a single mom with a teenage son stealing money from her, starting fights with kids for no reason, constantly lying, sending girls dirty pics and not doing anything at all at school.....I pleaded with the mom to actually discipline him but instead she wanted to do all kinds of weird therapy garbage and kept making the excuse he was autistic because he was so good at other things. Which yes he was, he was good at getting what he wants without consequence. I found it pretty silly and it wasn't my first experience with a mom like that, wasn't all her fault though the dad was just a complete deadbeat and as a woman she can only do so much to try and raise a man.....but that's a whole other topic. I could only think back to my childhood where I was too afraid to screw up because of my father, I was afraid of my mother too but that was different I was more afraid of disappointing her rather than actual discipline from her.....but my pops yea I was terrified of him as any young man should be!
 

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Autism as in your child needs special coddling because they have no social skills, no discipline and can't function socially in anything past a video game chat? No I don't believe in that, it may sound crude but I think it's used a lot as a crutch.
I once worked for a family who had a young son like this. The parents were upset that the school suggested their son might have autism. Of course he didn't, but it looked like it because they hadn't put any effort into raising him.
In the same family they had an older son who was 100% autistic. I think autism is real because i have a degree related to it and direct experience working with those who have it. It is a spectrum and it is different than simply being retarded. But I also agree with others that it is overly-diagnosed. I also suspect it is related to genetics and vaccines (although I've been attacked on other platforms for this belief). Just because one study lied doesn't mean that other studies that showed the same results are wrong too.
 

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
Not sure I understand the purpose of this thread discussion. Regarding the thread's question, yes - it is real.

As someone who was briefly around other special needs children with various disabilities one summer (1970's - good times!), I vividly remember an autistic child in my group who wore a protective helmet all the time. He was constantly banging his head.

From my understanding at that time - I was a child with various disabilities too - whenever he banged his head, it was due to sensory overload. Banging his head was sort of like a way to self-regulate when it got too much for him to handle in an unfamiliar environment (i.e., noises, bright lights, etc.).

Most importantly, banging his head was also his way of communicating with others (he couldn't speak) - i.e., whenever he got frustrated or had some kind of anxiety, he would just bang his head to let them know about something that bothered him (i.e., lights too bright).

Some say head banging is "self-abuse", which I thought too at that time. It depends on how severe a child's autism is.

Meanwhile...

1zlplk.jpg
 
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Camellia

Pigeon
Woman
My humble and very unscientific opinion is that some people seem to have a genetic predisposition to autism that is then triggered by neuro toxins, which are abundant in our modern world. I'm highly suspicious of vaccines.

I also see that a lot of permissive parents use autism as an excuse for not disciplining their kids. A mom in our neighborhood has two unruly kids and she always said "my sons are just neuro atypical". She spent thousands of dollars trying to find out what their problem was, but doctors never gave her a diagnosis. I thought to myself: your kids don't have any problem, the problem is your parenting style.
 

Artemis Seven

Chicken
Woman
This seems to be a bit in my lane. This past August, I, well into adulthood, was diagnosed with high-functioning autism. I had been telling my family that something was off about me for decades and after my sister suggested it as a possibility, I went for a series of tests to confirm it. The reason I suspected is at 40, I had never had a boyfriend. I didn't have any close friends, even at college. Unless I was related to either the bride or groom or they went to my parents' church, I never got invited to wedding. I used to go to a largish young adult Bible Study for years and didn't get invited to a single wedding.

However, I was an incredible stickler for the rules while in K-12 and did well in classes, while I floundered in a far less structured college. Here are a few of my takes:

1) As difficult as autistic kids can be, I do think a lot of parents throw their hands up and give up. I read a story about a single mother that allows her 9 year old son to be "home schooled" by his 19 year old sister, even though he is one of the few students that is able to physically attend school. Because the child demanded it and the mother has no spine, he gets to stay home too, eventhough he needed in person learning. Cousin of a cousin of my mine has be diagnosed with autism and his parents leave him mostly to his own devices, with only some help from his school. So he calls everyone multiple times, turning him into a nuisance. I have suggested to get him in touch with a counselor to develop better coping skills and even sent a phone number. My mother was also pretty frustrated with me and had the added of responsibility of looking after her 4 youngest siblings, so she would handle it wrong when I had a meltdown. I don't know a ton about my dad's relationship with my grandfather, but it sounded like he was pretty strict, which is why he became so successful.

2) Lockdowns aren't helping. Turns out it is a pretty bad idea have kids stare at a screen for hours at a time. I go to a clinic of sorts that treats brain functions and memory, and because it is mostly computer games, the kids aren't returning because they can't take anymore screen time. If teachers aren't willing to teach the kids in person, they should have their salaries cut since they are no longer doing classroom management or they should be fired altogether.

3) Sounds like the schools weren't doing that great before lockdowns. I have been reading that recess are getting cut shorter. The one thing that can make a kid more manageable, is being pushed aside and looks like the schools are requiring a lot of woke bullshit in the curriculum. If the kids got funded instead the schools, maybe resource would be used to better help these kids cope.

4) I have told my sister this, but don't get lax with any standards. I am not saying don't help these kids reach deadlines and manage their time better, but never let ADHD and Autism be an excuse. However, do give them extra help to deal with the world. Rarely will they "figure it out," and if they are anything like me, they won't be able to create a support system outside of family. I didn't have any group friends in college, I barely had a single friend. So will everyone else had people to study and socialize with, I couldn't connect with anyone.
 

FrancisK

Woodpecker
Gold Member
This seems to be a bit in my lane. This past August, I, well into adulthood, was diagnosed with high-functioning autism. I had been telling my family that something was off about me for decades and after my sister suggested it as a possibility, I went for a series of tests to confirm it. The reason I suspected is at 40, I had never had a boyfriend. I didn't have any close friends, even at college. Unless I was related to either the bride or groom or they went to my parents' church, I never got invited to wedding. I used to go to a largish young adult Bible Study for years and didn't get invited to a single wedding.

However, I was an incredible stickler for the rules while in K-12 and did well in classes, while I floundered in a far less structured college. Here are a few of my takes:

1) As difficult as autistic kids can be, I do think a lot of parents throw their hands up and give up. I read a story about a single mother that allows her 9 year old son to be "home schooled" by his 19 year old sister, even though he is one of the few students that is able to physically attend school. Because the child demanded it and the mother has no spine, he gets to stay home too, eventhough he needed in person learning. Cousin of a cousin of my mine has be diagnosed with autism and his parents leave him mostly to his own devices, with only some help from his school. So he calls everyone multiple times, turning him into a nuisance. I have suggested to get him in touch with a counselor to develop better coping skills and even sent a phone number. My mother was also pretty frustrated with me and had the added of responsibility of looking after her 4 youngest siblings, so she would handle it wrong when I had a meltdown. I don't know a ton about my dad's relationship with my grandfather, but it sounded like he was pretty strict, which is why he became so successful.

2) Lockdowns aren't helping. Turns out it is a pretty bad idea have kids stare at a screen for hours at a time. I go to a clinic of sorts that treats brain functions and memory, and because it is mostly computer games, the kids aren't returning because they can't take anymore screen time. If teachers aren't willing to teach the kids in person, they should have their salaries cut since they are no longer doing classroom management or they should be fired altogether.

3) Sounds like the schools weren't doing that great before lockdowns. I have been reading that recess are getting cut shorter. The one thing that can make a kid more manageable, is being pushed aside and looks like the schools are requiring a lot of woke bullshit in the curriculum. If the kids got funded instead the schools, maybe resource would be used to better help these kids cope.

4) I have told my sister this, but don't get lax with any standards. I am not saying don't help these kids reach deadlines and manage their time better, but never let ADHD and Autism be an excuse. However, do give them extra help to deal with the world. Rarely will they "figure it out," and if they are anything like me, they won't be able to create a support system outside of family. I didn't have any group friends in college, I barely had a single friend. So will everyone else had people to study and socialize with, I couldn't connect with anyone.

If you don’t mind me asking, so what does this mean for you? What does it change now that you’ve been officially diagnosed?
 
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