Is Autism real or fake?

Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
Is it possible that many whom are labeled as high-functioning autistic, are actually just peculiar, and that this form of peculiarity is one whom does not want to mimic the status quo, being a more genuine, honest to (perhaps) a fault person? I have met people who are high-functioning, and they seem healthy, just with a uniqueness of tendencies. Mainstream pressure seems to produce unrealistic criteria, for what they deem acceptable behaviour, yet rewards perversion. Who decides the criteria?
I heard an explanation once that I wish I could quote precisely; it went something like this: It's not the peculiar traits in and of themselves that determine autism, but rather whether the traits affect the person's life to an extreme (and usually negative) degree. For example, one of my traits is that I detest people touching me, unless they are my significant other or a very small child. I am not simply a "non-hugger". The discomfort it brings me is so intense that I once asked my mom if I could possibly have been sexually assaulted in my early years.

My social isolation is another example. I'm far beyond your typical introvert. You know how people facetiously look forward to death so they won't need to work or deal with aching joints, or mundane nonsense anymore? I'm like "I won't have to be around people anymore." It's very extreme.

So. Your experience with people who are high-functioning but seem healthy? If they are truly healthy as you say, then, yes, it could be possible that they are simply peculiar, but still neurotypical. The tricky part is whether they are doing a really good job of ACTING healthy. I can act "just peculiar" to a relatively high degree.
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
I heard an explanation once that I wish I could quote precisely; it went something like this: It's not the peculiar traits in and of themselves that determine autism, but rather whether the traits affect the person's life to an extreme (and usually negative) degree. For example, one of my traits is that I detest people touching me, unless they are my significant other or a very small child. I am not simply a "non-hugger". The discomfort it brings me is so intense that I once asked my mom if I could possibly have been sexually assaulted in my early years.

My social isolation is another example. I'm far beyond your typical introvert. You know how people facetiously look forward to death so they won't need to work or deal with aching joints, or mundane nonsense anymore? I'm like "I won't have to be around people anymore." It's very extreme.

So. Your experience with people who are high-functioning but seem healthy? If they are truly healthy as you say, then, yes, it could be possible that they are simply peculiar, but still neurotypical. The tricky part is whether they are doing a really good job of ACTING healthy. I can act "just peculiar" to a relatively high degree.
Respectfully and kindly, I'm unconvinced. You may very well have a correct diagnosis, but I have met plenty of folk throughout the years, and everyone has their idiosyncrasies, etc. I actually enjoy those more genuine types of people more. Temple Grandin is an example of someone who doesn't fit in socially, but then who decides the criteria? I judge the fruits of character, not how fashionable someone is.
 

Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
Respectfully and kindly, I'm unconvinced. You may very well have a correct diagnosis, but I have met plenty of folk throughout the years, and everyone has their idiosyncrasies, etc. I actually enjoy those more genuine types of people more. Temple Grandin is an example of someone who doesn't fit in socially, but then who decides the criteria? I judge the fruits of character, not how fashionable someone is.
No offense taken, and I do hear what you're saying about "who decides the criteria". I totally feel that. I even think that way about the whole hugging situation. I was certainly not there at whatever figurative roundtable meeting occurred when they decided that "humans hug", and if you don't let someone come up to your own body and squish it against theirs and entrap you with their arms... well... you're the weirdo, not them.
 

FrancisK

Woodpecker
Gold Member
No offense taken, and I do hear what you're saying about "who decides the criteria". I totally feel that. I even think that way about the whole hugging situation. I was certainly not there at whatever figurative roundtable meeting occurred when they decided that "humans hug", and if you don't let someone come up to your own body and squish it against theirs and entrap you with their arms... well... you're the weirdo, not them.


It's not for me to tell you how to feel about your own life but I think maybe you've assigned this stigma to yourself and it's turned into an automatic explanation/excuse for everything and almost a constant ball and chain dragging you down, perhaps even a type of hypochondria. I'm really not writing this to just be a jerk and disagree for the sake of disagreeing and putting someone down but it legitimately bothers me as a person that you are at this state of existence and I wish better for you, a lot of things that you're saying are wrong with you because of autism in my opinion are not things that are wrong at all. There is nothing wrong with being different it doesn't mean you have a condition, I would hope that you look at things through that lens before just saying "there is something wrong with me, it's because of autism".....
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
No offense taken, and I do hear what you're saying about "who decides the criteria". I totally feel that. I even think that way about the whole hugging situation. I was certainly not there at whatever figurative roundtable meeting occurred when they decided that "humans hug", and if you don't let someone come up to your own body and squish it against theirs and entrap you with their arms... well... you're the weirdo, not them.
Rebuilding manners and etiquette in the future will restore social boundaries, so that we will all know what to expect, once again. Hugging is very personal, so I know what you mean.
 
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