Is Boeing losing the ability to make airplanes?

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
They're having a problem with a new jetliner. So much for "technological advancement".
Boeing shares tumble after new reports indicate quality control issues plague its flagship 787 Dreamliner.

According to the WSJ report, the wide-body jet airliner has "certain titanium parts" that "are weaker than they should be" that could lead to "premature fatigue."

The new problem continues to tarnish Boeing's reputation for building quality jets a little more than three years after two 737 Max jets crashed due to issues with flight control systems.

The new set of problems for the 787 come as the FAA continues to investigate alleged quality-control slips across Boeing's commercial airplane unit, according to an agency letter from Aug. 18. The heart of the problem is that Boeing allowed unqualified workers to examine and sign off on quality checks.

The Boeing spokesman said the new issue was discovered by employees conducting an in-house audit on quality-management systems.

WSJ said sources familiar with the titanium parts don't believe it poses an immediate risk to 787s already operating in the field. The parts seem repairable as two undelivered aircraft had titanium components swapped out for new ones that met quality control standards.

The discovery is among other 787 snafus Boeing has been trying to resolve for over a year since gaps between sections of the aircraft were found that could result in premature airframe fatigue.

The FAA hasn't approved Boeing's plan to inspect new 787s before delivery. In late 2019, the agency denied Boeing to perform safety checks before delivering MAX jets. An agency spokesman said regulators will retain the authority "until it is satisfied."
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
Flying is nowhere near as safe as a few years ago. They have already been getting worse, and worse, with affirmative action from airplane design engineers, to mechanics and even pilots.

Now they may fire unvaccinated pilots and mechanics. The latter being what should really worry you. Mechanics are a demographic more likely to resist vaccination, so where an airline might say 90% of their workforce has been vaccinated, that may only mean 70% or less of their mechanics. You can't just replace years of that knowledge overnight. I for one don't want to fly on a plane when the person doing the pre-flight checks is a new diversity hire there to fill a vacancy caused from an unvaccinated mechanic being forced out.

There will be more and more inexplicable mistakes. Fatigued, worn, and even missing parts will be ignored to an even greater extent. Planes will collide on the tarmac, if not in the air, and delays and cancellations will skyrocket permanently. An engine going out during a flight will be a regular occurrence.

The scary part is that it STILL may be safer than driving. All of what I said applies to drivers on the road as well. It's all part of the greater collapse going on.
 

GuitarVH

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
They're having a problem with a new jetliner. So much for "technological advancement"

From the article: The FAA hasn't approved Boeing's plan to inspect new 787s before delivery. In late 2019, the agency denied Boeing to perform safety checks before delivering MAX jets. An agency spokesman said regulators will retain the authority "until it is satisfied."


So let me get this straight - a regulatory, safety agency won't allow the manufacturer to inspect and perform safety checks on its own product? A product which is one of the most complex pieces of machinery ever made that tens of millions of people will depend on for their continued survival. On the surface, this is confusing.
 
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Mountaineer

Ostrich
Gold Member
Now they may fire unvaccinated pilots and mechanics. The latter being what should really worry you. Mechanics are a demographic more likely to resist vaccination, so where an airline might say 90% of their workforce has been vaccinated, that may only mean 70% or less of their mechanics. You can't just replace years of that knowledge overnight.
This. A really good mechanic is someone with decades of experience and such a man is very valuable. There is an element of lost art in this craft these days. The younger guys simply don't have the same knowledge. And what do we expect anyways if 'going fast' and having big, powerful engines is not promoted any more. This really died with the Concorde. One of the saddest days in history.
 

STG

Woodpecker
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soli.deo.gloria

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
They're having a problem with a new jetliner. So much for "technological advancement".
Pretty much. Boeing management made a strategic decision many years ago to prioritize profits over everything else and they are now paying the price. Many of their most brilliant and hard working people were pushed out when they objected to the changes. People who were not qualified were put in positions of power. They are not the company they once were. In so many ways it mirrors what has been happening with western civilization for the past 60 years.

 

Elipe

Pelican
So let me get this straight - a regulatory, safety agency won't allow the manufacturer to inspect and perform safety checks on its own product? A product which is one of the most complex pieces of machinery ever made that tens of millions of people will depend on for their continued survival. On the surface, this is confusing.
I wouldn't want a company inspecting its own product anyway, as a final metric for the product's safety. That's the watchman watching himself ("source: just trust me bro"). You want independent safety checks. I think that's what the story said in the last sentence about the agency wanting regulators to retain the authority.
 

GuitarVH

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I wouldn't want a company inspecting its own product anyway, as a final metric for the product's safety. That's the watchman watching himself ("source: just trust me bro"). You want independent safety checks. I think that's what the story said in the last sentence about the agency wanting regulators to retain the authority.

Independent safety checks are fine though they didn't actually mention that instead saying the FAA wanted to maintain authority until satisfied. The article says that Boeing can't do safety checks before delivery which seems ridiculous. If some agency wants to do additional safety checks after Boeing's, that would be a worthwhile redundancy.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Kingfisher
Gold Member
So let me get this straight - a regulatory, safety agency won't allow the manufacturer to inspect and perform safety checks on its own product? A product which is one of the most complex pieces of machinery ever made that tens of millions of people will depend on for their continued survival. On the surface, this is confusing.

I might be misreading this but I think what it's saying is that Boeing still needs to have the FAA inspect its planes prior to delivery to airlines (ie they can't just skip that step and perform the final inspections themselves), not that they can't perform preliminary inspections prior to the FAA doing so.
 

GuitarVH

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I might be misreading this but I think what it's saying is that Boeing still needs to have the FAA inspect its planes prior to delivery to airlines (ie they can't just skip that step and perform the final inspections themselves), not that they can't perform preliminary inspections prior to the FAA doing so.

OK, that might be right. It reads in a confusing kind of way. I might be stupid too. Probably all of the above.
 
I've already accepted the fact that I may never board a commercial aircraft ever again, what with mask and vaccine mandates. This only cements my resolve.

If not for God's love I'd be lamenting the fall of our once great empire, but more and more I look forward to the inevitable decline.

I flew to Northern Europe a few weeks ago for a pressing medical treatment. The ordeal I had to go through prior to traveling and at both airports cured me once and for all. And that's coming from a guy who used to work on his own pilot license - I love to fly. Never ever going to fly commercial again. The only exception would be chartered flights, which I can afford every once in a while but honestly I don't see the need. For the foreseeable future I'm hunkering down right here in Spain. Fully prepared and stocked up to the hilt. Let globohomo enjoy the coming winter - it's going to be interesting ;-)
 

Towgunner

Kingfisher
This doesn't surprise me. It's symptomatic of wokeness, which amazingly is infecting our corporations. Its obvious to me that equity is now more important than profitability for practically every company out there, at least in the US. When you see things like Coke saying you must be less white or Disney outright insulting their "fans" because they don't like the slop they created, you have to conclude the above. Moreover, what of the stringent "diversity" mandates now coming into existence. I know of one fortune 100 company that is now at a mandatory 50% "diversity" hiring, which is apparently going to 65% next year.

They speak of obtaining diversity milestones the same way GM used to talk about hitting a performance metric. Instead of obtaining a 15% operating margin, C suites celebrate equity initiatives. I recall Boeing boasted about their chief engineer being a female not too long ago. This happened right before the 737 recall event. Until recently, all I ever heard from the corporate side is how important it is to find and retain "talent". Even in a pre-woke period this always sounded bizarre to me, because, there was such an emphasis on only hiring and promoting women. But, woman policies aside, it was still more meritocratic. Today that's all but a memory. Certainly, the pro-discrimination woman-only hiring policies led to all of this, but, today these policies have manifested to such a degree that the very essence of a company has been altered.

Among many other things, these new changes include mandatory diversity hiring quotas. Whereas, this has been around for a while, its never been at the percentages today. And, of course, a very large demographic is deliberately left out, white men and increasingly white women too. Asians aren't too far behind also, as we see how they're discriminated against in academia.

So, what about recruiting and retaining "top talent"? How can that be possible if every position or 1 out of 2 positions requires an "equity justification"? Answer, it can't and quality must suffer. Ergo, companies are not optimizing their hiring procedures to get the very best person. This means lessor individuals get the job. Now, again, if this happens marginally, then the overall impact is insignificant. But, we're talking 50% and higher now. Already I've sensed this change. Products and services increasing su*k. This will only continue and the results will be crappier products and services.

Once upon a time, things like aerospace engineers, and for that matter, pilots and mechanics would have been immune from the woke, which is decidedly and openly against merit (ref: MIT denying a professor for speaking because he once said hire the best person for the job). But, the American Medical Association just embraced "equity". That means even doctors will be subjected to affirmative action. If they're willing to sacrifice quality among doctors they'll do it with airplanes.

This is happening very quickly. Unfortunately faster than a lot of people realize. Therefore, the impact is going to be a lot sooner than we expect. And from what I can tell you can expect things to simply not work all that well going forward. Corporations have basically become public utilities with make-work jobs. The trouble is in a competitive environment every little bit counts. That's why we used to hire athletic men. Even a small disadvantage can multiply quickly and turn into a disaster. These new policies are far and away more grandiose than we have ever seen. Therefore, these disadvantages will multiple and fast.
 

MKE-Ed

Woodpecker
Boeing is having some very serious quality control issues. They just moved most of their 787 Dreamliner production from Everett, Washington to South Carolina so they could reduce the production costs by hiring cheaper non-union and unskilled workers that are getting paid way less than the union workers in Washington state. It’s been reported by some YouTube aviation followers that Boeing has had to recruit workers from other states because the workers in South Carolina lack the required skills to build airplanes.

It’s also been alleged by some that the entire 737 Max issues that resulted in two of those planes crashing had all of their avionics software written by Indian software developers in India that had no experience writing aviation software. Boeing did this to save money. Sadly, Boeing has become the General Motors of the commercial aircraft world. They are losing a lot of business to Airbus.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
I flew to Northern Europe a few weeks ago for a pressing medical treatment. The ordeal I had to go through prior to traveling and at both airports cured me once and for all. And that's coming from a guy who used to work on his own pilot license - I love to fly. Never ever going to fly commercial again. The only exception would be chartered flights, which I can afford every once in a while but honestly I don't see the need. For the foreseeable future I'm hunkering down right here in Spain ;-)

That's what the Establishment want, though. To make international plane travel such a pain in the neck, that most men from the West, will stop travelling and stay put. And therefore, not see or experience freedom and warrior's s life, which nowadays only still exist outside of the gay Western world (except a few Bible-belt US States that still offer manly freedom). Hence the war on airplanes/carbon print.

Meanwhile, don't worry, all the 3d world hungry young men will travel by foot, boat or whatever, to invade and pillage resources and make cheap labor force, as mere inconveniences are nothing to them.

Personnally, Covid or not, I've been travelling quite extensively the world, unvaxed, generally dodging Pcrs, or if necessary, enduring a few PCRs. The Evil Establishment won't keep me "hunkered down", even though they might steal a few hours/quarantine days of my life, and occasionally probe, in vain, my well-cleaned nose.
 

The Penitent Man

Kingfisher
So let me get this straight - a regulatory, safety agency won't allow the manufacturer to inspect and perform safety checks on its own product? A product which is one of the most complex pieces of machinery ever made that tens of millions of people will depend on for their continued survival. On the surface, this is confusing.
I think this is just poor writing, the wording confused me too. Sounds like they were denying Boeing some kind of certification and not allowing those aircraft to fly. Maybe Boeing can find the WSJ journalist who wrote that a job as one of their inspectors.
 
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