It’s Time To Quit The Smartphone

andy dufresne

Kingfisher
There is an inverse correlation of how easy it is to communicate, and the frequency of quality communication. Pre-internet when long distance calls were expensive, people wrote letters. Letter writing was taught in schools. People used to look forward to personal letters from friends and relatives showing up in the mailbox. I still have letters that my grandparents and mother wrote me.

Back when long distance was expensive (you used to subscribe to plans where Sprint or MCI or whoever would let you call domestic for 60 minutes for $10 a month (or was it 20$? and that was on top of land line service) and then it cost maybe $0.05 a minute thereafter, so long as you called after 7:00PM. As expensive as it could be back then, people used up their minutes. People used to have long conversations on the phone.

Email came along and people thought great, we can communicate better. Well, in the beginning people did write good emails, then they got shorter, started being sent to groups instead of individuals, and then they sort of died off, other than a few lines on a rare occasion. People still re-read letters that men who did not pass the eighth grade wrote during the Civil War--could you pay anyone enough to read what few personal emails go around in 2021? Now email is mainly junk mail, and hardly anyone sends letters, postcards, or cards through the postal service.

Long distance became basically free about when text messaging came around. So those long conversations that one paid for every month, basically went away. Instead we have vapid, usually pointless text messages of a few words or abbreviations. One wonders if people could accidentally text each other for a few days before figuring it out, because they are probably sending the very same texts as everyone else.

Used to when people wanted to learn about something they got a book. Now they click here and there on YouTube and some stuff is OK there, but not nearly the depth that a good book would have on the subject. I like watching videos by South Main Auto on car repair, and they are good, but it occurred to me I could learn more in the same hours if I just read a used auto mechanics textbook. If a person was interested in current events or the latest developments of something they would subscribe to a print journal. There is simply no comparison to click-baity news stories that were typed in ten minutes before publishing, to a 10 page article that was worked on for a month then screened through editors.

When we got social media, we stopped being social. Belonging to a bowling league, the PTA, the local historical society, a small group at church, etc.--that was normal, practically universal behavior. Everyone knew their neighbors, and likely spent time with them. But it was traded for being able to type "LOL" on Facebook posts and fume at the political rants of someone barely remembered from high school. Used to, that circle of people would support themselves, not by clicking on sappy emojis, but by actually showing up in person and doing something.

Kids, instead of spending hours a day on electric devices, used to do things like read, bike around, even do things like set up and play elaborate role playing games with friends.

People have mentioned iPods and such, and sure, I have an MP3 player myself. But if a person has never listened to entire albums they are missing out. Try listening to entire albums, there are gems on the B side and used to some albums were crafted so one song would lead to another. Strange as it sounds, I still had all the old cassette tapes I had in the 1990's, mostly never played after I went to CDs in the late 1990's. Bought a used tape player to hook up to the stereo, and it has been great fun listening to those old tapes. There is something wrong about only listening to the "best of" everything. More depth to entire albums end to end.

I could go on, but all this smart technology is a curse on the human race. Everything it is supposed to do, it only casts a shadow of what it is supposed to do, while it really charges headlong towards the opposite of what it promised.
Well said. The most dangerous word in the English language is 'Convenience'.
 

westernman

Sparrow
With a smartphone, you're more alone than you realize.
I fully realize how alone I am. It's bad. Without a smartphone, it would be immediate family and 1-2 guys i work with. I think it's unwise to cut off all other social contact with people

We have fringe beliefs. We do not desire the same hedonistic entertainment that most of the population partakes in. I think is unwise to limit contact with likeminded people
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Dumb person, smart phone here. So, in order to fully minimize tracking I want something without internet access, right? And if I remove the SIM card from my iPhone I can still take pics but it won’t track me, right?

My iPhone is dying, so I’m in the market for a new phone. Even before the November fiasco I was considering getting a dumb phone.
 

Elmore

Kingfisher
There are definitely levels.

Socrates was against writing (and he had good arguments). Reading, itself, is always a solitary action - except when you are reading to other people, but it's clearly not meant for that, it is meant to be taken alone. So literacy will always create, to a certain extent, solipsism and isolation.

Neil Postman argues, very persuasively, that the printing press - by democratizing writing and reading - cannot be separated from the rise of individualism. And he also argued, again persuasively, that the telegraph was what effectively changed the communication environment in the same radical way as the printing press did before - and that put the process in motion to where it is now, with smartphones and these little disconnected thought-worlds we all live in.

His argument also tackles the 'newspaper question' by saying that newspapers before and after the telegraph are essentially two different mediums: before it they provided actionable and relevant information to the population of a certain place, which was always somewhat local, in this way they are part of the community environment; after the telegraph, they became able to give you news about things on the other side of the country, continent, globe - and therefore become useless collections of unactionable and irrelevant factoids. His book focuses, however, on television, which reinforces a lot of the bad things the telegraph created, and adding new, even worse, ones.

The smartphone, I think, is a collection of all these bad things put into one device. It's a shame Postman didn't live to write another book specifically on digital technology.

For those interested in diving deeper into his argument, here's the book (which is a classic for a reason): https://quote.ucsd.edu/childhood/files/2013/05/postman-amusing.pdf

The Druids wouldn't write anything down, it is why we know so little about the intricacies of their faith. They believed that in writing their doctrines down, it could be stolen and corrupted. Everything was from oral transmission.
 
There is an inverse correlation of how easy it is to communicate, and the frequency of quality communication. Pre-internet when long distance calls were expensive, people wrote letters. Letter writing was taught in schools. People used to look forward to personal letters from friends and relatives showing up in the mailbox. I still have letters that my grandparents and mother wrote me.
[...]
People used to have long conversations on the phone.

Email came along and people thought great, we can communicate better. Well, in the beginning people did write good emails, then they got shorter, started being sent to groups instead of individuals, and then they sort of died off, other than a few lines on a rare occasion.
I'm probably one of the few under 30s that prefers longer conversations on the phone, as opposed to continuing instant messaging. I don't have a lot of downtime during the working week to message back and forth for hours on end. I prefer to use messaging apps to set a time window for a 30 minute - hour long phone conversation, that is at a mutually convenient time.

It is the quality over quantity for me. Using messaging apps as most people do entails significant downtime awaiting messages from people with no ETA. Instant messaging is like awaiting an important telephone call, without a confirmation of if, or when, a response is given. Efforts are then made to "decode" the response patterns of the respondent, and attempt to draw inferences. It is the classic, "be keen, but not too keen", or wondering why you didn't get a text back. Instead of improving clear lines of communication, it promotes the opposite.


Used to when people wanted to learn about something they got a book. Now they click here and there on YouTube and some stuff is OK there, but not nearly the depth that a good book would have on the subject. I like watching videos by South Main Auto on car repair, and they are good, but it occurred to me I could learn more in the same hours if I just read a used auto mechanics textbook.

For me at least, I process the material more efficiently in written form, contrasted with the aural form. A well written textbook read thoroughly, would allow most people of moderate intelligence, to have a solid foundation of 90% of the nuances of a certain subject.
 

MajorStyles

Pelican
When I shared my decision to buy a dumb phone on one of my live streams, a common response was that I would be tracked anyway through cell towers....yes, I know that using a cell phone gives up my location data, but with a dumb phone, nothing beyond that is given. The difference in data flow is like between a leaky bathroom faucet and Niagara Falls.

This is the "Yea, but..." crowd. When they see you moving forward, they will highlight the pointlessness of your actions.

Their inability to see subtle - yet important - differences is significant. Are they not smart enough to see the difference? Or, are they just playing contrarian? Or, do they lack the will to fight for a Weltanschauung? Perhaps it's a combination. Either way, when you listen to these "Yeah, but..." crowd, you end up wasting your time and not accomplishing your goals.

The "Yeah, but..." crowd can do more damage than the outright naysayer. They gently encourage you to enter the murkey world of powerlessness as opposed to giving you an outright shove.
 

Laus Deo

Pigeon
There’s been a lot of talk lately about the 5G rollout, but not as much about its effect on other end of the scale: the dismantling of the 2G network in many countries. The old Nokia-style dumphones were only compatible with 2G so you’re now being forced onto using a smartphone if you just want a phone.
 

Pantheon

Pigeon
Modern phones are like the Ring. They are shiny and when you put them on you become enchanted by their magic. They are hard to take your eyes off and you will always be attracted to wear them. Through them we gain access to the world all the while our will is bent to serve the underworld goddess of electricity.

When the magic wanes, you realize how ugly and annoying they are. How ridiculous it is to poke your finger over a touch screen designed for materialistic moderns who neither have a firm grip in their hands nor of reality. Academic intellectuals have always been jealous of those who are artistic and good with their hands - which is why they have gone to such extraordinary lenghts to control the world and abolish physical reality.
 
Originally posted on RooshV.com

woman-smartphone-1024x683.jpg

When coronavirus hit, I began to realize that the data sent out from my smartphone could be weaponized against me in a quarantine scenario where leaving the house was “illegal.” I didn’t want to voluntarily help the elites monitor my every movement and then nudge me into performing their desired behaviors, so I made the decision to buy a dumb phone (a classic phone without apps) and tried leaving my smartphone at home when going out.

Very early into the coronavirus pandemic, Google compiled location data from Android users around the world to put out worldwide “mobility reports” to help Bill Gates know if his evil plan was working or not.



Google would then join Apple to hard-code contract tracing software directly into their operating systems. I could only guess how many other Silicon Valley companies were soaking up my location and usage data to aid pro-quarantine factions. Why should I give them all that information for free to simply search the web, send text messages, and use a navigation app?

I had to accept that I have become dependent on my smartphone. I took it everywhere I went and glanced at it incessantly to experience its warm glow even when not receiving notifications. I didn’t buy my first smartphone until I was already in my thirties, so did I really need the internet in my pocket at all times? I already spend most of my day in front of a computer, typing articles like this, so why take another digital screen with me wherever I go? I saw the coronavirus crisis as a prime opportunity to reduce Silicon Valley’s access to my data while lessening my dependence on digital screens.

When I shared my decision to buy a dumb phone on one of my live streams, a common response was that I would be tracked anyway through cell towers. This is true. Every phone, smartphone or not, is connected to a cell tower that knows your exact location within a few meters. This location data is then eventually packaged and sold to various marketing firms, but a smartphone is different in that it produces reams more precise data every day—I imagine several extra gigabytes a month—about who you are and everything you’re doing, and directly pipes all that data to Silicon Valley firms in real-time, allowing them to build a master profile on you that can easily be used against you. So yes, I know that using a cell phone gives up my location data, but with a dumb phone, nothing beyond that is given. The difference in data flow is like between a leaky bathroom faucet and Niagara Falls.



The smartphone alternative I chose is the Nokia 3310. For its sparse features, the price is surprisingly high, suggesting that smartphones are given away at razor-thin margins for companies to make money on the backend from the free data you give them. Since you don’t need any mobile internet with the Nokia, you can find a plan for under $10 a month with US Mobile or Tello. I pay $7 a month for a basic plan (about half of my monthly charge is taxes).

Sometimes when I go outside the house, I only take the Nokia. Less than ten people know its number. I’m trying to leave my smartphone at home more often and use it as a home tablet to stay in touch with friends around the world. In the case I need to take the smartphone outside, I leave it on airplane mode as long as I can.

How about for driving navigation? I plan my trip at home before leaving. Either I write the directions down on a sticky note or print them out.

How about music and podcasts? I have an old Android smartphone with no SIM card. I factory reset the phone and made up a new Google account. Using wifi at home, I load up my podcasts and download songs using Spotify’s offline feature.

How about meeting out with friends? I don’t meet friends out in public much anymore (thanks, Bill Gates), but if I do, I give them my dumb phone number. You can use phone calls and SMS to stay in touch with them when heading out to meet.

It’s possible that my attempt is futile and makes little difference to the powers of Silicon Valley, but I’m certain they have less data on me than before. Even better, I stare at screens much less. For short trips, I leave the house without taking any phone. I actually like the feeling that no one knows where I am or how to get in touch with me. My family is of course annoyed with yet another one of my eccentric experiments, but I simply don’t want what amounts to having an ankle monitoring device in my pocket, radiating my testicles, at all hours of the day. I wonder if in a year or so it’ll be wise to use a smartphone at all.

Read Next: I Was Fooled By The Promise Of The Internet
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You should not use Spotify. They manipulate their users.

 

stugatz

Pelican
Agreed on Spotify. I usually listen to new music through YouTube when it's available on there, sometimes I torrent it.

Most of my massive collection is in MP3s I've gotten through a combination of library CD ripping, YouTube rips, torrents, and low-cost third party MP3 sites based in foreign countries.

Downside - the audio quality of the music isn't much. This, though, encourages me to buy physical copies of what I like.
 

ben1

Pigeon
I've been mulling this over and realized I can't. I need various apps on my phone to be able to log in with MFA to several systems I need for work. It's almost as if added security isn't the only reason everything is going to MFA for authentication nowadays.
I watched a video of how to do this using pass otp in unix.
 

Stadtaffe

Woodpecker
Gold Member
It is true, camera, GPS, mp3 player, telephone could be on separate dedicated devices. I only had a real, modern smartphone for about two years until about five years ago and have had a small, very early degoogled android phone since then which is capable of only 3.5G, which is a lot slower than 4G. Save myself from myself. Removed whatsapp recently, and I try to stick to FDroid open source apps. Otherwise, use Aurora instead of google play store and MicroG instead of Google play services. OsmAnd instead of google maps. Too paranoid to use the contacts in my phone so I sort of remember the numbers and the threads. I don't actually feel that eccentric when I read about Roosh's phone habits! Is actually an idea to just have a dumbphone for out and about and a smartphone on WiFi without a sim and only answer the international contacts from there. Do enjoy the open source podcast app AntennaPod a lot though, mainly for conservative podcasts.
 
There’s been a lot of talk lately about the 5G rollout, but not as much about its effect on other end of the scale: the dismantling of the 2G network in many countries. The old Nokia-style dumphones were only compatible with 2G so you’re now being forced onto using a smartphone if you just want a phone.
The flip phone (an Alcatel) I have does not depend on 2G. Maybe old flip phones will not work with it, but the newer flip phones do.

Mentioned it elsewhere, but if one is really concerned about being tracked, look into a pager. They are still available in some areas. Then just leave your phone off unless someone needs you. Pagers use VHF towers that send messages out in all directions, they have no idea where pagers are.
 
In one of Dyer's interviews, he mentions that the origin of smart phones is from a gulag program. I can't recall the name of these machines though, something like "svitzgable". If anyone can help me out that'd be awesome. We need to study the soviet union in great detail because it never actually collapsed. It just went dark and now it's coming back out again in full force (the silicon valley / tel aviv cybernetic-kabbalist cult). Like Golytzin wrote about, the USSR never collapsed, it just feigned defeat and went crypto. These people think we're their cattle, and want to use EMR grids to control everything in the human domain - it's like on cattle farms how they use cell towers to influence the cattle to breed, not rampage, etc. We're livestock to these people, and they're in communion with the fallen ones (the "gods", who are actually the captains of Satan, who will soon reveal themselves to mankind as salvific entities according to the writings of the Saints on the end times).
 
What's the best alternative? Buying via iTunes?
I download all my music to my harddrive/phone. I do not want any algorithm to choose what I should listen to.

I create playlist on my own. Phonograph is a good music player for android. You can download it via F-Droid (a privacy focused app store).

I personally noticed that spotify always created playlists with music that glorified drug use and premaritial sex.

You can record music from spotify using a programm called "Sidify Music Converter".
 
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