It’s Time To Quit The Smartphone

Bitter End

Woodpecker
Bandcamp seems a decent service, maybe they have globalist ties too but even small bands are on there. For anything remotely popular the MP3 converters from Youtube do a wonderful job. Never enjoyed the streaming of anything unless it was a live event. I still have the old mindset of stashing good things onto your hard drive.
 

John Nash

Chicken
Its not really about a Smartphone, its how you use it. My Tip, get the smallest screen you can, maybe an iphone SE, the old one, right now I have an iphone 12 mini. Only install the apps you absolutely need, and only put a few apps on the home screen. Now, put it in air plane mode when its in your pocket, don't shut it off, because a phone can still be on when its turned off, put it in airplane mode. Only use it when you need it and with intention, NO notifications, turn them off. Set the screen to black and white & use black wallpaper.
 

skotus

Chicken
Call me paranoid (admittedly, I am), but what worries me somewhat is that not having a smart phone is a datapoint in and of itself. And that those brave — err, convicted — enough to resist mainstream tech might just set themselves apart and become easier targets for the oligarchs...

“He’s completely anti-social, prone to conspiracy theories. He doesn’t even have a smart phone!”
 

Gingerrodent

Chicken
Woman
Originally posted on RooshV.com

woman-smartphone-1024x683.jpg

When coronavirus hit, I began to realize that the data sent out from my smartphone could be weaponized against me in a quarantine scenario where leaving the house was “illegal.” I didn’t want to voluntarily help the elites monitor my every movement and then nudge me into performing their desired behaviors, so I made the decision to buy a dumb phone (a classic phone without apps) and tried leaving my smartphone at home when going out.

Very early into the coronavirus pandemic, Google compiled location data from Android users around the world to put out worldwide “mobility reports” to help Bill Gates know if his evil plan was working or not.



Google would then join Apple to hard-code contract tracing software directly into their operating systems. I could only guess how many other Silicon Valley companies were soaking up my location and usage data to aid pro-quarantine factions. Why should I give them all that information for free to simply search the web, send text messages, and use a navigation app?

I had to accept that I have become dependent on my smartphone. I took it everywhere I went and glanced at it incessantly to experience its warm glow even when not receiving notifications. I didn’t buy my first smartphone until I was already in my thirties, so did I really need the internet in my pocket at all times? I already spend most of my day in front of a computer, typing articles like this, so why take another digital screen with me wherever I go? I saw the coronavirus crisis as a prime opportunity to reduce Silicon Valley’s access to my data while lessening my dependence on digital screens.

When I shared my decision to buy a dumb phone on one of my live streams, a common response was that I would be tracked anyway through cell towers. This is true. Every phone, smartphone or not, is connected to a cell tower that knows your exact location within a few meters. This location data is then eventually packaged and sold to various marketing firms, but a smartphone is different in that it produces reams more precise data every day—I imagine several extra gigabytes a month—about who you are and everything you’re doing, and directly pipes all that data to Silicon Valley firms in real-time, allowing them to build a master profile on you that can easily be used against you. So yes, I know that using a cell phone gives up my location data, but with a dumb phone, nothing beyond that is given. The difference in data flow is like between a leaky bathroom faucet and Niagara Falls.



The smartphone alternative I chose is the Nokia 3310. For its sparse features, the price is surprisingly high, suggesting that smartphones are given away at razor-thin margins for companies to make money on the backend from the free data you give them. Since you don’t need any mobile internet with the Nokia, you can find a plan for under $10 a month with US Mobile or Tello. I pay $7 a month for a basic plan (about half of my monthly charge is taxes).

Sometimes when I go outside the house, I only take the Nokia. Less than ten people know its number. I’m trying to leave my smartphone at home more often and use it as a home tablet to stay in touch with friends around the world. In the case I need to take the smartphone outside, I leave it on airplane mode as long as I can.

How about for driving navigation? I plan my trip at home before leaving. Either I write the directions down on a sticky note or print them out.

How about music and podcasts? I have an old Android smartphone with no SIM card. I factory reset the phone and made up a new Google account. Using wifi at home, I load up my podcasts and download songs using Spotify’s offline feature.

How about meeting out with friends? I don’t meet friends out in public much anymore (thanks, Bill Gates), but if I do, I give them my dumb phone number. You can use phone calls and SMS to stay in touch with them when heading out to meet.

It’s possible that my attempt is futile and makes little difference to the powers of Silicon Valley, but I’m certain they have less data on me than before. Even better, I stare at screens much less. For short trips, I leave the house without taking any phone. I actually like the feeling that no one knows where I am or how to get in touch with me. My family is of course annoyed with yet another one of my eccentric experiments, but I simply don’t want what amounts to having an ankle monitoring device in my pocket, radiating my testicles, at all hours of the day. I wonder if in a year or so it’ll be wise to use a smartphone at all.

Read Next: I Was Fooled By The Promise Of The Internet
Permalink
Hi Roosh, one of your female followers here. I too have become fed up with the power the smartphone has over my life. I have reduced its usage and also stopped using Amazon. I have saved money and actually go shopping instead of reaching for phone. I go out without it lately and it feels great. I am in my 50s so knew life before internet and mob phones I feel free and quickly forget about it.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Hi Roosh, one of your female followers here. I too have become fed up with the power the smartphone has over my life. I have reduced its usage and also stopped using Amazon. I have saved money and actually go shopping instead of reaching for phone. I go out without it lately and it feels great. I am in my 50s so knew life before internet and mob phones I feel free and quickly forget about it.

Hi there, fellow elder. Same age here. Most of my adult years weren’t bellied up to the digital bar, so I think I’ll adjust easier. Researching a dumb phone now for when my iPhone dies shortly. I’ll be keeping it for a camera. I’ve been watching more tv, which isn’t good but better than staring at the computer/phone. I’m weaning slowly .
 

Gingerrodent

Chicken
Woman
You will be surprisedif you lived younger life without one how easy it is once you decide its going to be a slave not a master. I think keeping one for some usage is ok but I would say give yourself a day free of it every 3rd day to start.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
You will be surprisedif you lived younger life without one how easy it is once you decide its going to be a slave not a master. I think keeping one for some usage is ok but I would say give yourself a day free of it every 3rd day to start.

A free day sounds like a good idea. I like it. When we first moved to this house we didn’t have internet for a month. It was a lesson in how addicted I was. I used up my data then spent another $40 on data before I cut my junkie self off.
 

Gingerrodent

Chicken
Woman
Its a time thief. I get so much more done when the phone is off. I dont watch TV and havent for years, i watch youtube, bitchute etc. Sometimes just being quiet or listening to Gregorian Chant is wonderful. Are you in the US Lamkins I am in the UK.
 
Hey guys and gal(s),

I've decided I'm just going to go back to a dumb phone. I hate my smartphone.

Does anyone have any practical tips on what cell phones are the best, and what's the best (and cheapest) way to get things set up so I can just call and text? I want a flip phone ideally, because that way I won't be tempted to text constantly. That's one of the main problems for me at this point.

I also wanted to ask about something a little more advanced. I have this app on my smart phone called "smartline" for my side business that allows people to call me on a business phone number I registered with GoDaddy. Is there a way I can port that number to an app on my computer if it's connected to the internet? If I have to disconnect that phone number I will, because almost nobody calls me on it anyway. I'm also thinking of getting a land line.

Thanks for the help and God bless you all!
-Karl Von H
 

Bird

Kingfisher
Does anyone have any practical tips on what cell phones are the best, and what's the best (and cheapest) way to get things set up so I can just call and text? I want a flip phone ideally, because that way I won't be tempted to text constantly.

Samsung GT-C3520
It's small in your pants pocket and still working for almost 10 years after falling down several times.
I recently bought a new battery for 5 Euros since its capacity was close to zero.
 

DanielH

Pelican
Just got a Nokia 3310. I did browse a lot, wanted to get one of the CAT phones but they're a bit pricey. The Nokia has bluetooth, radio, and mp3 functionality. Planning on putting an audio bible on it and some good music like classical and Orthodox music. Can't really think of anything I'll be missing out on from ditching the smartphone. Already instinctively grabbed the Nokia a few times to check notifications before putting it down because that's not a thing. Will probably give an update in a few weeks.
 

piceaabies

Pigeon
Does anyone have any practical tips on what cell phones are the best, and what's the best (and cheapest) way to get things set up so I can just call and text? I want a flip phone ideally, because that way I won't be tempted to text constantly. That's one of the main problems for me at this point.
I have since 3 weeks been using my new cat b26 phone, its a sturdy buttonphone and while it isnt a flipphone, it's slow texting should scare off most unneccesay texting. It costed me roughly 7 dollars.

I did this in sweden so don't know if it works similarily in US. I looked into it and it seems that the payment method for calls i used in sweden is called "pay to go" or "prepaid phone" in the US. You basically load in money to the phone which gets used up as you make calls and text, this means that you don't passively have to pay a monthly fee and also disincentivizes overuse of the phone.
B26-2.png
 
A 'smartphone' is like money...It makes you more of what you already are.

There is intense danger from the corruption of naive youth through 'everywhere' base content (Who bought thier phone?) and also in enriching the Enemy through ignoring the immense power of data collection and psychological profiling, but you, as an 'adult,' how do you use your phone?

What's stored in organized files on it?

* Wise quotes from Great Men?
* Books like Sir Francis Bacon's 'The Essays' or Baron de Montesquieu's 'The Spirit of Laws?'
* Pictures that you have taken that are connected with times of deep meaning, natural beauty, or conviviality that you reflect on?
* Writings of Ancient Historians?
* Wonderful food recipes that you master?

What do you 'store' in an organized and ready fashion on your phone?
Or do you just web surf on a whim?

It's like a pencil. You can use it to write a wonderfully encouraging letter to a friend in time of need, or you can unjustly attack someone with its sharp end.
In the end, you are the 'pencil.'
-- The Secret Shakespeare

"All things excellent are as difficult as they are rare." -- Baruch Spinoza
 
Top