IT Jobs

Not sure if there's already a thread for this, but I'd like discuss IT jobs ITT. Everything from basic Help Desk/IT support, to Cybersecurity, to Programmer/Software Engineer or Network Admin stuff.

I'm thinking of picking up some professional certs and attempting to get into Cybersecurity. Is it a good field overall, and difficult to be outsourced unlike software engineer and programming jobs? I'm currently thoroughly researching, and weighing the pros and cons of security analyst etc vs software engineer.

And for anyone in the know, how are job prospects in the security field? Is it already saturated or still good?
 

GT3RS

Newbie
I'm currently a recent graduate with a Bachelor's in Cybersecurity.

I'll say this, right now the US job market is slowly picking back up from what was a complete shit show. Cybersecurity is highly over-saturated at the entry level. The entry level jobs are things like SOC Analysts, who are looking for threats, trends and monitoring systems. It really depends on what kind of job you want to get in Security. SOC Analyst is one of the better entry postions. There is also things like threat assessment, pentesting, DevOps and development, Systems Admin... Security is a big field.

Personally, I think the IT in the bubble in the US has already just popped. They now push shit like "Learn to code" and "Girl who code" to everyone and his dog right now. I would recommend you start applying for internships yourself and see how you fare. The truth is, as a white male, you are going to be treated like absolute shite and I hate to say it, but some woman will take your place.

Look at Equifax. The CISO (Chief Information Security Officer) was a fat woman with a Bachelors and Masters degree in Music composition.

Personally, I've completely given up. I spent 4 years doing my Cybersecurity degree, got numerous CompTIA certifications, only to get a bugman soul sucking job making 60k in a major US city, where I save virtually nothing. There is no chance to move up. There is no career stability. I am fucking fed up. Only 22 but I'm done with this.

I learned digital marketing and web design. Started freelancing on upwork.

Decided to move to Vietnam in January, already have my ticket booked. Got an ESL (English teaching) job so I could secure my working visa. I will probably try to get in consulting there and rise up the ranks, learn vietnamese, etc. Personally, I think there's greener pastures elsewhere.

Again, please do this for yourself and see how your mileage may vary. But its a huge myth that cybersecurity has a "shortage." Complete BS.

You are better off moving abroad and building a online business for yourself with computer skills in 2020. Just my take.
 
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FullThrottleTX

Woodpecker
I'm currently a recent graduate with a Bachelor's in Cybersecurity.

I'll say this, right now the US job market is slowly picking back up from what was a complete shit show. Cybersecurity is highly over-saturated at the entry level. The entry level jobs are things like SOC Analysts, who are looking for threats, trends and monitoring systems. It really depends on what kind of job you want to get in Security. SOC Analyst is one of the better entry postions. There is also things like threat assessment, pentesting, DevOps and development, Systems Admin... Security is a big field.

Personally, I think the IT in the bubble in the US has already just popped. They now push shit like "Learn to code" and "Girl who code" to everyone and his dog right now. I would recommend you start applying for internships yourself and see how you fare.

Personally, I've completely given up. I spend 4 years doing my Cybersecurity degree, got not numerous certifications, only to get a bugman soul sucking job making 60k in a major US city, where I save virtually nothing. It's fucking bullshit.

I learned digital marketing and web design. Started freelancing on upwork.

Decided to move to Vietnam in January, already have my ticket booked. Got an ESL (English teaching) job so I could secure my business visa. I will probably try to get in consulting there and rise up the ranks, learn vietnamese, etc. Personally, I think the USA is completely fucked.

I disagree with you on IT being a burst bubble, being that I'm in the field, the opportunities are vast and well paying and I get hit up every day.

60k is really good for an entry level job. I dunno what you expect to be making... in 3 or 4 years you can easily double that.
Your first IT job is always going to be hard to get. Your school should have helped you secure internships and placements. If not, it wasn't worth the price tag. DevOps is a very profitable field, a lot of people are making 200k, but nobody is going to trust you with their stack without experience unfortunately, you should have done an internship or 2 in college.
 
I’m 28 and a software engineer. From my experience and also what I’ve read on Hackernews... there’s never been more demand for high quality engineers or devops engineers.

So you have to be good. It’s pretty much a bimodal distribution. If you’re just a basic dev that can’t create or even comprehend more complex systems... you’ll prob be stuck around 85k max.

We’ll see how the pandemic affects working, offshoring etc.

I think overall it’s a solid job. The core skills are used in all software system design, so you can work in any industry as an engineer. You can work remote, and politics is somewhat less important than performance.

seems like it’s best to pick one thing and get good at it, then diversify. Like Java system engineer, React front end dev, etc
 

paninaro

Kingfisher
So you have to be good. It’s pretty much a bimodal distribution. If you’re just a basic dev that can’t create or even comprehend more complex systems... you’ll prob be stuck around 85k max.

I'm in the industry and same here. If you're good your job wont' be outsourced and you will make good money. We hire only top talent and everyone at that level makes $150k+ salary.
 

Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member
Very informative 8 minute video by an extremely successful immigrant entrepreneur who served honorably for 4 years in the US Army and moved his company from Clownifornia to Texas. Describes current best and worst industries you should consider... He has 2.4 Million YT subscribers mostly entrepreneurs so has quite a few high profile interviews on his channel due to his reach...

 
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EndlessGravity

Kingfisher
Very informative 8 minute video by an extremely successful immigrant entrepreneur who served honorably for 4 years in the US Army and moved his company from Clownifornia to Texas. Describes current best and worst industries you should consider... He has 2.4 Million YT subscribers mostly entrepreneurs so has quite a few high profile interviews on his channel due to his reach...

Completely disagree with his statement that if you were wiped out in an industry that took a hit... that it's not your fault. It is 100% your fault. Business isn't a game and you have to prepare for uncertainty and how your company will survive.

Good video, otherwise.
 

Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member
Erratta... Full context if you were in an industry that took a severe unforeseen Covid pandemic hit like travel, leisure, airlines that were booming last several years now unemployment at 29% then not your fault HOWEVER if you remain in an industry that then takes a second unforeseen virus hit then it is your fault. Context is important for real meaning.

Worst industries Travel, leisure, airlines, cruise ships.

IT and Healthcare industries -11%

Ironic best industry is financial services -4.5%

Moral of the story work in IT in the most resilient industries that employ USA citizens who can pass background checks and drugs tests and not H1B shops likely to borrow up and code via Github and backdoors.

I am the former Lead Information Security Architect and legacy, hybrid and cyber security vendors trained expert AWS, Azure, CASBs full stack CISSP CCSP and am now focused on my own DLT Financial project where I am Chairman and CEO and not subject to Sirajul and Mujibur H1B chicanery.

With the new Tillson TaSS revolution many industries will collapse and new ones Boom forewarned is forearmed.

 
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I am the former Lead Information Security Architect and legacy, hybrid and cyber security vendors trained expert AWS, Azure, CASBs full stack CISSP CCSP and am now focused on my own DLT Financial project where I am Chairman and CEO and not subject to Sirajul and Mujibur H1B chicanery.


I need to stay in this part of the forum to learn from y'all !!!
 
Can anyone think of a more flexible moderate/high paying (>$120k) job?

If you are intelligent and experienced, the worst may be a few weeks a year of crunch time. Otherwise it’s 15-40 hours of work a week. Easy remote.
 

Easy_C

Crow
With the new Tillson TaSS revolution many industries will collapse and new ones Boom forewarned is forearmed.

Ive suspected for awhile that the old ERP guard of SAP and Oracle are becoming weak. They’ve succeeded until now based on shady business practices and name recognition, but that’s rapidly being surpassed by the popularity of buzzwords like “cloud” and “AI” that they have extremely limited capabilities in. I suspect that at some point Amazon is going to roll out an ERP that’s native to AWS and clean house.
 

Easy_C

Crow
Can anyone think of a more flexible moderate/high paying (>$120k) job?

If you are intelligent and experienced, the worst may be a few weeks a year of crunch time. Otherwise it’s 15-40 hours of work a week. Easy remote.

Not flexible...but if you want to make 120k going up to 200k eventually (assuming you don’t break out of the rank and file) for a 40 hour week work in internal audit or compliance at a large bank.
 
Not flexible...but if you want to make 120k going up to 200k eventually (assuming you don’t break out of the rank and file) for a 40 hour week work in internal audit or compliance at a large bank.

Yeah, from what I've seen that is def true. But the skillset is much less transferable, and honestly I could never work in such a boring area (no offense to anybody). At least if you built some complex distributed real-time system in banking, you could carry over the same architecture strategy to something like Uber pricing rides in realtime, or some weather system doing large real-time weather simulations or something.
 
What about python/anaconda/jsnode and sql for backend?

That's fine. Learn the strengths of each language/ecosystem and go for one that interests you.

Like Python has amazing data science libraries, is easy to write, etc. Maybe not the best for a large scale system because it is not a typed language.

Java is obv typed and adopting/has adopted awesome features that make it really appealing for large distributed systems in banks, etc.

SQL is easily the biggest bang for the buck, but you need interesting databases to work on to learn the more advanced stuff. It really doesn't take that much to learn up to about an intermediate level. Just being an SQL wiz alone will get you in the door for some types of jobs imo.

Frontend is its own world. I would learn enough to be useful with it, be able to make changes or create useful pages, but not delve into it deeply. That will take you a lot of time. But again, it is a niche (well a fairly big niche). Any niche expert is going to provide value and get compensated for it.
 
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