Japanese people not reproducing

SamuelBRoberts said:
There's ten billion Indians running curry restaurants, too, or at least there was when I was there a few months ago.

Wonder if it's just the area I was in.

There was an Indian restaurant right in front of the hotel I stayed in Tokyo. I spoke to the owner in Punjabi, he told me I wouldn't like the food because he has to tone the spices for the Japanese pallet. I also saw a couple of IT workers at the Emperor's palace - this was 2014 so there's probably more there now:

Japan’s ‘green card’ welcome for Indian IT professionals, amid US H1B visa reforms - Article from Feb 2017

New Delhi: If opportunities for Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals are closing in the US with the new regime proposing new laws to reduce the numbers of H1B visas held by foreign workers including Indians, a new window is opening in the East—Japan.

Under a plan to attract Indian investment and talent to Japan, the Japanese government is introducing a new law to reduce the waiting time for skilled Indians to only 24-48 months’ to obtain a “green card” with permanent residency status.

To be sure, the “green card” programme is open and applicable to all nationalities.

But Indian tech workers hold an advantage. Not only does India have a pool of such a skilled workforce, Japan has also identified IT as a priority area for Indian investment.


The “green card” system is to be introduced next year, said Shigeki Maeda, executive vice-president of the Tokyo-based Japan External Trade Organisation (Jetro) that has an office in New Delhi as well.

Under the programme, “talented” or “highly skilled” Indians including IT professionals could get residency status “in one or two years compared to the five or six years in the US and the UK,” Maeda said.

Indian IT firms have been worried about business and employment prospects in the US following Donald Trump’s election as the 45th President of the US. Trump has called for US companies to hire Americans as he pushes ahead with his election promise to create jobs at home. Some bills have also been introduced in the US Senate seeking to more than double the minimum salary of H1B visa holders to $130,000—making it difficult for firms to use the programme to replace American employees with foreign workers, including from India.

India and Japan signed a social security pact last year—that provides for Indian workers on a short-term contract in Japan exemption from making a social security contribution there—would also be a helpful move for Indian IT professionals in Japan, he said. The pact will also help easy remittance of benefits in case of relocation.


In the case of IT, “India has very advanced technology. Our ICT-related industry does not have the talent and capacity of India,” Maeda told reporters ahead of the “Invest Japan Symposium” organized by Jetro, Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and the Indian industry body CII in New Delhi. “India and Japan will complement each other in this area,” Maeda said.

According to government statistics, Indian investment in Japan between January 2003 and November 2016 amounted to $468 million while Japanese investment into India between April 2000-September 2016 was to the tune of $ 23.8 billion.

There could be some hot Indian-Japanese mixes out there in the future...
 

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Crow
Gold Member
One white dude that I went to college is in Japan now working for a Japanese aircraft/defense company. Dude got in with a teaching visa, passed his japanese language test after two years living there (and 4 years of japanese in college). After that he applied to an aircraft component supplier, got the job. He's in a 2 tier city tho.

Another friend is in defense too, she got the job from someone in the defense industry who recommended her. 250K+ salary. She's a college dropped out but later was VP for a defense start up.
 
Foreigners Are Shoring Up Japan's Shrinking Population

While the latest data shows that the number of Japanese shrank by a record in 2016, the demographic picture isn’t quite so bleak when you include the growing ranks of foreigners.

There are now 2.3 million foreigners resident in Japan. And their numbers grew by almost 150,000 last year, halving the decline in number of people living in the nation.

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The biggest population of foreigners, known universally in Japan as "gaijin," was in Tokyo. The 486,346 foreign residents in the capital now account for 4 percent of its population, up from 3 percent in 2013.

The smallest number of foreigners is in northern Akita, famous for rice and snow. Only 3,637 foreigners, comprising just 0.35 percent of the population, were living there as of Jan. 1.

And while Japan is one of the most aged societies in the world, that’s not true of non-Japanese living in the country. Ninety-three percent of them are under 65, compared to only 73 percent of Japanese.

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However, unless there’s a massive expansion of immigration or a change in birthrates, even increases in foreign residents at the current level won’t be enough to stop or reverse the demographic decline.

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Zerdame

Woodpecker
If you actually live in Japan, you realize that the younger generation are largely apolitical and gives no shits about any of their country's problems. Those who do are seen as weird and honestly thats most of the developed world anyway. Japan is already reluctantly pushing their doors alittle wider and lowering the bar for foreigners to find employment in Japan. I have a friend who works for the Immigration Bureau in Japan and he happens to be in the department where they issue the COEs and according to him, there have been pressure from the higher ups to be lenient towards certain nationalities when applying for work visas.

Contrary to what the media harps on, apparently they are more willing to give work visas and PR to Koreans and Chinese, whether they are from the mainland, Taiwan, HK or any other chinese speaking countries. Reason being that they would blend into Japanese society easier and their offsprings would look more "japanese" so its funny how the media constantly demonizes their neighbours but the government is more willing to take in Koreans and Chinese for the sake of maintaining a Japanese look while taking the weight slightly off the population problem.

Living in the big cities can be like living in your own bubble. You see young people all around you and just presume its the same all around the country but even on a sunday afternoon on the streets of a second tier city like Himeji, its shocking how most people up and about(apart from tourists) were largely in their 30s or above.
 

Bushido

Ostrich
Gold Member
What I will say is that there are tons more Asian foreigners here than 5 years ago. You guys probably can't tell the difference between the various Asian races, but it's obvious to us. Places like 7-11 and other chains are now staffed by foreigners like never before.
 

cascadecombo

Ostrich
I noticed that as well Bushido, it was mostly in Tokyo and foreigner heavy places in Osaka. those jobs are also the ones most people don't especially want to do, similar to America where the immigrants are happy to do them not caring about what social status the job may have.
 

Zerdame

Woodpecker
Indeed, almost every family mart or 7-11 has at least one foreigner working in it as well as ramen stores also employing foreigners. This isn't just the large brands like Ichiran, even the small store at the corner street could have a Chinese university student. These jobs have long hours and don't pay well but they are pretty relaxed about employing foreigner college students.

On a side note of game, most of these students are banged up and are hardly above a 6 but you do get the occasional stunner, mostly from China or Taiwan, who probably earns 800yen an hour who would be super appreciative to spend her off day on a date with you. Especially if she's studying alone in Japan and you speak her language, some of these girls are also some of the most down-to-earth, genuinely sweet girls that you hardly find in big cities.
 
Zerdame said:
Indeed, almost every family mart or 7-11 has at least one foreigner working in it as well as ramen stores also employing foreigners. This isn't just the large brands like Ichiran, even the small store at the corner street could have a Chinese university student. These jobs have long hours and don't pay well but they are pretty relaxed about employing foreigner college students.

On a side note of game, most of these students are banged up and are hardly above a 6 but you do get the occasional stunner, mostly from China or Taiwan, who probably earns 800yen an hour who would be super appreciative to spend her off day on a date with you. Especially if she's studying alone in Japan and you speak her language, some of these girls are also some of the most down-to-earth, genuinely sweet girls that you hardly find in big cities.

Absolutely spot on. This happened today actually, as there's this really cute girl with glasses and that works in the Family Mart on the first floor of my building. There was one register open but a guy in front of me forgot his wallet. So, she flagged me over and I opened up in Japanese about how the guy left us hanging or something. She was shocked that I speak the language and needless to say, we're meeting up after she gets off work.


Back to the topic at hand, people who gripe about population shrinkage and how the "insert hyperbolic statement here" is the end of Japan need to look at some historical trends to see how things are going. One article discusses this in more detail:

LINK


TOKYO
“Population black hole” is one dire phrase among many used to describe the demographic dwindling of Japan. From its peak in 2008 of 128 million, the nation’s population has shrunk to just over 127 million. Last year alone, it fell 215,000.

The old live longer and the birth rate drops. Latest statistics show 33 million people 65 or over. That’s roughly one-quarter of the population, and more than twice the number of children 14 or younger.

It’s easy enough to paint this in black. Among those to do so was the Japan Policy Council, which last May warned that by 2040 the number of women of childbearing age (20-39) living outside the major cities would decline by half. Regional towns would shrivel, rural occupations and industries would die, schools and hospitals would close, public transportation would grind to a halt, infrastructure would crumble – and what then? What’s left of Japan’s youthful population would pour into Tokyo, Osaka, and a very few other urban conglomerates whose resources are strained as it is. The worst-case long-term scenario envisaged by the more pessimistic analysts is “the extinction of Japan.”

Look on the bright side, says Shukan Shincho (April 30). There actually might be one. Some obvious advantages of a thinning population immediately come to mind – less crowded facilities, a less frenetic, more relaxed pace of life. It’s a question of adjustment. Takahiko Furuta, president of the Research Institute for Contemporary Society, speaks of our current “growth society” evolving into a “mature society” – less growth, deeper enjoyments of the fruits of growth to date.

Nor would growth necessarily wither. Furuta cites toilet paper by way of homely example. Population shrinkage has already caused a noticeable drop in demand. Undaunted, producers vie with each other to make the softest brand, or the one most attractive in terms of design. Consumers are willing to pay higher prices in return for quality – at least when it comes to some items – and competition flourishes. What’s true in one sector will be equally true in others, if not in all.

Then there is housing. One-seventh of the houses in Japan are said to be vacant. It sounds disastrous, but is it? Sweden, Furuta tells Shukan Shincho, had a similar problem 30 years ago, and solved it with a concept known as “double housing.” Owning two homes – one in the city, another in the country – became standard as city-dwellers bought up vacant rural properties for a song. By now the old urban-rural distinction scarcely applies. Each individual is urban on weekdays, rural on weekends and holidays – part salaryman, part farmer. Might that happen in Japan too?

Population declines have occurred before, Furuta reminds us, without causing “extinction” or anything close to it. In 1718, Japan’s population was 30 million. Seventy years later, owing to a series of famines, it had fallen by 3 million. Famines are terrible, but this particular episode of depopulation coincided with a remarkable cultural flowering in which kabuki, ukiyoe art and introductory studies of Western science (the popular term was “Dutch studies”) flourished. So might the current depopulation generate cultural forms still unknown.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and the business advocate group Keidanren have spoken of the need to keep the population above 100 million. Furuta wonders if they know where that 100 million figure originally comes from. It figured prominently, he explains, in the political rhetoric of World War Two. It was considered Japan’s ideal population given the national ambition to conquer Asia under the euphemism “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.”

No matter what site you go to, you'll notice the "solutions" to this population crisis all parrot the same ideas:

1) More unskilled immigration

2) More women in the workforce

As they've been explained on here ad nauseam, we all know the results of what will occur if Japan goes down this road. Luckily, clickbait-era journalists and globalist sycophants don't read and review economic data, as it would clearly show that there's very little correlation between population growth and GDP per capita. If Japan focused more on PRODUCTIVITY, then issues of population would be little to no concern. That's a different discussion for a different day, but overall, immigration and "womenomics" have by and large been grossly unsuccessful in countries where it's implemented. Why people think it will work in Japan is beyond me.

Okay, my lunch break is over. Gonna get off work and enjoy the evening with glasses girl, toasting one up for RVF and hot convenience store pussy.
 

Samseau

Owl
Orthodox
Gold Member
For Japan to take in Chinese/Koreans or whatever cannot be a bad thing for them. No different than America taking in Europeans.

Japan is a massive bubble but they are still in a far superior position, politically speaking, than almost every country on the planet. Their corporate jobs seem to suck major ass, but living a simple quiet life in Japan during a cultural winter is hardly the worst of evils.
 
Apparently Japan has asked the Indian Parsi community for help:

Glimmer of hope at last for India's vanishing Parsis

A jubilant Katy Gandevia passed around a box of celebratory sweets she had received in her office at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in Mumbai.

"That," she said, gesturing towards the sweets, "was to celebrate the birth of the 102nd baby."

The baby in question had been born under the Jiyo Parsi scheme, a federal government initiative launched in 2013 to stem the decline of India's Parsi population. Dr Gandevia is a senior member of this initiative.

Every baby born is a moment for celebration in the dwindling community that traces its ancestry to Zoroastrian refugees who landed on the coast of the western Indian state of Gujarat around the 8th Century.

Fleeing Islamic persecution in Persia, the new arrivals integrated with the local populations, while maintaining their distinctive ethnic identity. As a highly-educated and prosperous community, their success and influence have been far in excess of their size. And that size is always shrinking.

With each census, the number of Parsis has dropped, even as India's population of 1.3 billion people has grown.


The latest 2011 census put the number of Indian Parsis at 57,264, a fall from 114,000 in 1941, and extinction has increasingly become a reality.

Jiyo Parsi is an ambitious plan to halt that.

For its first phase - which will conclude in a few months - the scheme received 100m rupees ($1.5m; £1.2m) to defray costs of fertility treatments for Parsi couples earning less than 2m rupees a year.

The campaign also sought to encourage Parsis to go forth and multiply through advertising, counselling and outreach efforts.


That flipped the script on family planning, a key part of Indian government policy for decades.

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When it was first announced in September 2013, the scheme quickly became both a headline and a punchline. Its quirky outreach included ad campaigns that urged couples to "Be responsible, don't use a condom tonight" and told young men to cut the umbilical chord and marry because, "isn't it time you broke up with your mom?"

But even though some objected that the campaign reduced women to their uteruses, it appeared to have made a dent.

"The scheme created an enthusiasm and a buzz," Ms Gandevia told the BBC. "People were pessimistic but this has been a ray of hope."


Most of the babies have been born in Mumbai, which has India's largest concentration of Parsis. The number includes five pairs of twins and a roughly equal number of boys and girls.

One woman who declined to be identified claimed she had given up on having a child after repeated efforts which drained both her patience and money, but said that the financial assistance and counselling under the Jiyo scheme helped her conceive.

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Another woman said: "At the age of 41 when most women start experiencing the symptoms of menopause, I am experiencing the symptoms of a long-awaited pregnancy. At the end of every tunnel there is light."

Before she became a coordinator for the scheme, Ms Gandevia, a social scientist and Parsi herself, had studied this tightly-knit group for more than a decade.

She said the first cause for alarm was in 2001, when census figures showed a sharp drop.

"That was the time the bells should have started ringing. The writing was on the wall," she said.

More than 30% of Parsis don't marry, and an equal proportion are more than 60 years old. The total fertility rate for Parsis - the number of children a woman has - has dropped to 0.8. The average for India is 2.3, and 2.1 is the figure at which a population remains steady.


A combination of factors has been responsible for this: marrying outside the community or not at all, divorce, couples having only one child and late marriages.

Furthermore, women who marry outside the community are not allowed to raise their children in the faith.


Hence, the two-pronged efforts of the team, which believes that talking to people, without lecturing them on reproducing, can be a powerful motivator.

"It is all because of the advocacy work that I decided to have a second child," said a Mumbai-based woman who is in her first trimester. "In whatever way, it is my small contribution."

The woman said she initially decided not to have another child to focus on her career.

"But maybe subconsciously I wanted another kid," she said. "All of us are happy."

Emphasising community pride and the joys of kinship has been another thrust area - a new advertising campaign launching later this month will focus on family.

Impressed by their efforts, even government of Japan - a country where the population is rapidly ageing and the fertility rate has fallen to 1.4 - has approached Parzor Foundation, an implementing partner, to decode the success of the campaign.


"When we started, we were going into unknown territory," Shernaz Cama, the foundation's director told the BBC. "This had never been attempted by an urban, educated community before. Now we are seeing interest from all over."

Although the initial euphoria is palpable, it is too early to estimate any demographic impact it has had on the fertility rate.

"But 102 babies were born that would have otherwise not been there if Jiyo Parsi hadn't provided support," said Ms Gandevia. "That is a fact." She added that the real effects would be visible a generation from now.

Still, there are currently more Parsis dying than are being born every year. In Mumbai, for instance, about 750 Parsis die annually, and 200 children are born, pointed out Jehangir Patel, the editor and publisher of Parsiana, a community-focussed publication in the city.

"Even five or 20 more births per year more won't change the demographics," he said. "It's a good endeavour helping couples who might have otherwise not been able to have children but it won't drastically change the picture."
 

eljeffster

Kingfisher
Bushido said:
What I will say is that there are tons more Asian foreigners here than 5 years ago. You guys probably can't tell the difference between the various Asian races, but it's obvious to us. Places like 7-11 and other chains are now staffed by foreigners like never before.


Damn, you're right!

almonds.jpg
 

semibaron

Kingfisher
In my opinion, Japan is getting bashed far too, especially when comparing to other Western countries.

I'm in Fukuoka right now and see everyday relative young Japanese women with 1-2 children. Also I see a lot of guys approaching chicks on the streets. Current birthrate is around 1.4 child/woman and this without any immigrants.

Now compare this to your average Western European country. Let's pick Germany. When have you seen the last time a woman below the age of 30 with a child? Does any guy has the guts to approach girls? I don't think so. Germany, Spain and a whole lot of other countries also only have a birthrate of ~1.4 children/woman, BUT with a lot of young immigrants, who simply reproduce at a higher speed.

So, at least for me, Japan is doing much better than at least Western Europe.
 
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