Ladies Forum introduce yourself thread

DelMarMisty

Newbie
Hello,

I am 30, married 5 years ago. I am an Orthodox Christian and seeking to connect with people who are also of faith. I struggled in my marriage for a while, as I was ridiculed by secular society for being 'too young' to be married and that I was missing out in life. I let these comment in and they slowly tainted my vision where I began doubting my life and my marriage immensely which caused great divide and angst between my husband and I. God eventually revealed His path for me, and I finally have peace. I struggle daily with pride and other sins, and I am working on my self spiritually to reach a place of humility, love and acceptance. I am currently reading the New Testament, and each day I am learning and understanding more about the faith. Would love to connect with you all and share some insights and Christian perspectives on life in current times.
 

EntWife

Newbie
Hi, I've been reading the forum for a while, but never signed up since I'm not a man. It's a great idea to have a place where women can post without messing up the rest of the forum.

I'm an Orthodox Christian, and, like Misty, I also married young. Or what passes for young nowadays - I was 20! In my early and mid twenties, there were people acting like I was a child bride. They thought I should be partying, sleeping around, and working on a career. I didn't want to do any of those things so I ignored them. I'm very glad now that I didn't listen to them. My husband and I have been married a little over 20 years now, have very sweet, good-hearted children, and are finally on the right path spiritually.

What has helped a lot over the years has been to keep in mind that the whole world is upside down. They're constantly telling us that what's wrong is right, that what's ugly is beautiful, and vice versa. I still went the wrong direction spiritually for a while, but it was necessary in order to get to where I really needed to be. Or as someone I used to know would say all the time, "God writes straight with a crooked line."
 

Roosh

Cardinal
I lost count how many men have told me their parents urged them not to marry young, even when they married young themselves. The problem is if you don't marry "young", you can fall for a lot of traps and end up not marrying at all. Even my own mom gave me this advice (she married at 26). I wonder if it's some sort of projection from people who fell for the "grass is greener" meme.
 

EntWife

Newbie
I lost count how many men have told me their parents urged them not to marry young, even when they married young themselves. The problem is if you don't marry "young", you can fall for a lot of traps and end up not marrying at all. Even my own mom gave me this advice (she married at 26). I wonder if it's some sort of projection from people who fell for the "grass is greener" meme.
That's pretty standard advice from parents, unfortunately. Most people aren't going to remain celibate until their late 20's or early 30's, so it means they're accumulating emotional and spiritual damage that will make it harder for them to get and remain married.

I think another thing that doesn't help is that most teenage boys don't get much romantic attention from teenage girls. They end up thinking either that there's something wrong with them or that all girls are hypergamous sluts who only want the quarterback. Both conclusions aren't helpful.

When my sons reach the teenage years, I'm going to explain to them that most girls like guys who are a little older than them. So they'll have more romantic success in their 20's. My husband says that most of the girls in high school didn't pay any attention to him. Things changed when he went to Bible college as a 22 year old (family issues prevented going to college earlier) and went to classes with a bunch of 18 and 19 year olds.

That's where I met him. I had a lot of competition since I wasn't the only girl who thought he was a mature man of the world. Now I look back and think how young we both were! And we thought we knew so much! LOL
 

DelMarMisty

Newbie
Hi, I've been reading the forum for a while, but never signed up since I'm not a man. It's a great idea to have a place where women can post without messing up the rest of the forum.

I'm an Orthodox Christian, and, like Misty, I also married young. Or what passes for young nowadays - I was 20! In my early and mid twenties, there were people acting like I was a child bride. They thought I should be partying, sleeping around, and working on a career. I didn't want to do any of those things so I ignored them. I'm very glad now that I didn't listen to them. My husband and I have been married a little over 20 years now, have very sweet, good-hearted children, and are finally on the right path spiritually.

What has helped a lot over the years has been to keep in mind that the whole world is upside down. They're constantly telling us that what's wrong is right, that what's ugly is beautiful, and vice versa. I still went the wrong direction spiritually for a while, but it was necessary in order to get to where I really needed to be. Or as someone I used to know would say all the time, "God writes straight with a crooked line."

Nice to hear from you! It is good to see you remained strong headed. Even as a Christian, the lures of the world and people's snarky comments really overwhelmed me for some time. It is good to remember that the world is upside down, and when you understand this fact it becomes clear and you can easily see the delusion. How did you go down the wrong path spiritually? Of course, I was too for a while. It's amazing, because I was raised in the faith and yet I felt as though nobody shared the faith with me. I used to bring home statues of Buddha from holidays, and no one would say anything, or they wouldn't make a big deal. I had a very general and vague understanding of Christianity for a long time. My husband's father is an Orthodox Priest, and even then, people around tend to not want to hear it. In any case, I was called more strongly to the faith when my commitments to work etc slowed down during lockdown and once I also found Roosh's articles and commentary on Christian books etc, it ignited even a deeper interest. I'm really honestly glad to have found this forum, it is so valuable in these times where I am surrounded by mostly secular people with very leftist views.
 

EntWife

Newbie
Misty, it's a long story, more of that "God writes straight with a crooked line" stuff.

I was raised in a church that shows up in books with the word "cults" in the title. (No drinking poisoned kool-aid or doing weird sex stuff though! Just kooky, fringe beliefs.) My husband and I met at one of their Bible colleges. Not long after getting married, we left that group and knocked around Protestantism for a handful of years. Then we were baptized and chrismated in the Orthodox Church.

So far so good, right? Except there were always doubts in the back of my mind. "Is this even true? Do miracles actually happen? What if there is no God? Or angels, or saints? Why don't my prayers feel like they go anywhere?" I'd read my Bible or the lives of the saints and struggle to believe that these things actually happened. I'd always been taught that disbelief is a sin so I tried to push these thoughts aside and just believe.

It didn't work though. I finally shared my thoughts with my husband, and he admitted that he had doubts of his own. We initially tried to work through it. Finally, we gave up and became atheists.

People kept asking why I became an atheist, and I gave the standard answers about biblical inconsistencies and things in the Bible that were impossible to believe and just couldn't have happened. It kept bugging me though, this niggling uneasiness that I didn't know why I didn't believe.

After a few more years, I finally figured it out. When I was supposedly a Christian, my actual deeply held belief system was not any version of Christianity. It was scientific materialism, which I had learned from public school and the surrounding culture. I couldn't admit that or even see it at the time because that's not what a Christian is supposed to believe.

Becoming an atheist made it possible for me to openly believe what I believed. I no longer had to hide it from everyone, and even from myself. Initially this was a relief, but doubts started to creep up on me again. Scientific materialism isn't all it's cracked up to be. Are your thoughts just chemical processes and neurons flashing in your brain? What about love? Was my love for my husband and children just brain chemicals? How about their love for me? Did life on earth really come to be through evolution, through blind, mechanistic chance? How is that even possible? Richard Dawkins may claim that, statistically, a group of monkeys with typewriters and enough time could produce the collected works of Shakespeare, but we all know what would happen if he gave monkeys typewriters and let them try. But scientific materialism demands that I believe that evolution could produce our beautiful human DNA, because billions of years!

Eventually, I started wanting to go back to church, although I hadn't figured out yet what to believe after I realized how stupid and fake scientific materialism is. My husband was still dead set against anything to do with Christianity. I ran into some druids and various occult people online. They talked about how this was the same as Christianity, and I could do rituals with Christ and the saints instead of pagan gods or whoever. I started to read up on it, then just barely started to dabble with it. Strange and terrifying things happened.

I turned to the Theotokos for help, and immediately received it. A genuine miracle occurred, and my husband did a complete 180 and decided we needed to go back to the Orthodox Church. That was about three or four years ago. It hasn't been easy, especially since we live in a rural area with no Orthodox church. It's a five hour round trip journey to go to church, which is hard with kids, so we don't go often. We do a reader's service at home most Sundays. I'm asking St. Basil the Great to pray for us and help to have a church here in the county we live in.

It's interesting (and great!) that the coronavirus hysteria helped you strengthen your spiritual life. The government reaction to the coronavirus has been retarded, but there have been some good things that have come of it. I think a lot of people have gotten closer to God because of it. They've at least had some time to wonder about the meaning of life, what it's all for. So you're not alone!

I'm glad you're here on the forum. Except for my husband and children, everyone in my daily life is either indifferent or actively hostile to the Orthodox faith. It's so nice to talk to you!
 
Hello Fellow RVF Ladies!

I never imagined I’d see the day where ladies were posting in this forum. I too have been a longtime follower of the forum and Roosh, a “lurker”, and I’ve enjoyed the discussions being free from feminine interference. Kudos to Roosh for this kind advancement, creating a space for the sisterhood of likeminded ladies.

A little about me, I’m early 30’s, married, mom, Roman Catholic. Some interests include cooking, reading, gardening, sewing, embroidery, candle making, hiking, holistic health and beauty, Montessori parenting, homemaking, vintage mid-century/ Victorian/ classical art and aesthetic. My husband and I started doing a little amateur bird watching during the pandemic, inspired by Roosh. I have a vast collection of cookbooks which brings me great joy and inspired my moniker here.

Like many, I too have burned by the rot our society. The product of divorce in my early childhood and a strong independent mother who was a self serving feminist career woman. Paired with a public school education, unlimited access to tv (hello SATC!), and being largely left to my own devices, it’s no wonder that my early adulthood was filled with anger, confusion, and generally degenerate behavior.

By the grace of God I didn’t continue down that path. A strong desire for truth lead me home to Christ. I truly believe that my baptism, the short time I spent in Catholic school, and the prayers of my grandmother (she would pray the rosary with me before bed when she visited) saved my life. Thankfully I was able to wake up and get on the path to creating the life I enjoy today. Ask and you shall receive! Gods ways truly are best.

So many women today are suffering immensely. Trying to reconcile their true nature with a modern world that contradicts everything sacred. No wonder they are miserable. I am helpless seeing the pain of so many friends, but advice is unwelcome. I try only to live by example.

Misty & Entwife, what a great blessing you have in having married young! Departing from traditional wisdom it truly is frowned upon by pretty much everyone now. The main issue with marriage today is not being centered around Christ. Most people with negativity towards marriage (young or otherwise) really have a problem with the state of marriage today (unbeknownst to them). Young marriage being looked down on says more about the state of young people and the people who raised them than of marriage itself.

Misty, it’s so beautiful to hear how God healed your marriage and your heart.

Entwife, your story is very interesting and inspiring. I’m going to start a thread, ‘How did you find RVF, the red pill, and Christ’. I’d love to hear about more women’s stories. Your advice is sound, to approach the world as being inverted and it will help avoid the snares of the devil. I don’t want to fit in with modern society, I want to follow Christ. It might not win me the most friends, but I prefer to be fulfilled spiritually. The struggle for me right now is coming to terms that I think I have to let go of certain friendships. Like you, most people in my life are indifferent, openly subversive, or Christian in name only. My circle of friends is largely a hold over from long past days of my own degeneracy. We are blessed though to live in a very large traditional Catholic community. So we’ve been making more new friends which has been such a blessing for our family. It’s also the ultimate white pill to be surrounded by an abundance of Catholic families where 4 is considered a small amount of children (we only have 1 but pray we will be blessed with more).

I am very grateful to have met your virtual acquaintance. I look forward to more discussion.
 

EntWife

Newbie
Welcome, VAHousewife!

Yes, modern culture confuses women and makes it harder to get what we really want - a husband and children. In your case, it was made worse by your parents' divorce and your mom's careerism. It's good that you were able to change your path when you still had time to get married and have children. What a blessing!

It's nice that you've got a community that encourages large families. It's amazing to me that so many parents go to a lot of time and effort making sure that their children know that they shouldn't have many children. How do they think they're going to get grandchildren if they make babies sound like a crime or some kind of disease?
 
Just another product of these times. Even my very traditional FIL who is red pill on so many things once mentioned how ‘you won’t want to have too many children or you’ll neglect the first ones’. What?! At my age I’ll be happy to have ALL the babies God will blesses us with. Love multiplies it doesn’t divide. I love my husband so much I want to drown in a sea of our babies. To think there are lots of women who do everything to prevent pregnancy, or worse, kill their babies. Fighting tooth and nail to be able to kill your babies?! I can’t imagine a more sick culture.
 

EntWife

Newbie
It's true that with each additional child you have less time to devote to any one child. That's not the whole story though. Each new family member is another person for the older children to love and be loved by. When I'm busy and can't pay attention to them, they've always got their siblings to turn to. Plus it's so sweet how they interact with each other and how much they love each other.

It may seem like the house is full of love, but there's always room for more.
 
Thank you, Roosh. And hello, ladies!

I've been a silent lurker since early 2014, and I'm pretty excited to find out about this new little corner of my favorite place on the internet where I can actually talk! It's especially reassuring given all the censorship and funny-business going on with all of the large platforms right now. I'm very grateful. And especially for the forum format. It is my favorite. I <3 old internet.

I am 34. Happily (re)married. Two adolescent sons (from first marriage). I also married young, the first time around, at 19. Pretty much everybody thought I was crazy. I just knew what I wanted. And I tried to do everything right, but was never taught how to navigate the liars, narcissists, abusers, etc., didn't really have anything resembling a solid religious teaching or a community to learn from. I dun' got had. My ex-husband reminds me of some of the women in the divorce horror stories here on RVF. :confused: The rest of his family is pretty sensible, though.

My own parents were dirty hippies (although they've made great strides in life and I love them dearly). My ancestors are all European and mostly Catholic. My parents both went to Catholic schools. I was raised in a Vaishnav household (subset of Hinduism). :hmm: Some New-Agey enlightenment nonsense going on there for sure. I have always considered myself a Christian, although I knew virtually nothing about Christianity until well into adulthood. It became extra-obvious when I tried to be an atheist for a few years and figured out exactly which God I was angry at (trite, perhaps, but TRUE).

The man God eventually set in my path when I finally got my head on straight and my compass pointed in the right direction is proof, to me, that God works miracles, even (and especially) for the fallen. Proof also that proud efforts are worth nothing next to prayers of humility.

Over the last few years, I've helped my husband open his own business, and he let me quit my job so I wouldn't have to put my boys in school (they've always been homeschooled, modern education is cancer). I don't like the word "lifestyle," but if I had to describe how we live, basically we are prepping to eventually build a rural homestead... but for now we live in a rented townhouse. Our budgets are small and our margins are tight, but our systems are good!

I truly enjoy and have a passion for pretty much all of the things feminists hate me for being good at: cooking, cleaning, baking, sewing, taking care of my family... and ALSO, these days, perversely: reading, writing, maths, sciency things, and winning at everything. They hate those the worst.

I consider myself Catholic, although what was going to be my first time ever attending Mass (many moons ago, now) was CANCELED thanks to "COVID." I suppose you could say I have so far FAILED to humble myself sufficiently to feel any kind of good about PREPENDING an additional ritual to my very first formal act of worship (mask on, name in book). I guess you could also say that I am in hiding. I am waiting. I am learning how to heal from some things, and learning how to use my gifts and talents to better serve the Lord.

I am DEFINITELY very happy to be among other traditionally-minded Christian women. Well met, all. :nerd
 

DelMarMisty

Newbie
Hello Fellow RVF Ladies!

I never imagined I’d see the day where ladies were posting in this forum. I too have been a longtime follower of the forum and Roosh, a “lurker”, and I’ve enjoyed the discussions being free from feminine interference. Kudos to Roosh for this kind advancement, creating a space for the sisterhood of likeminded ladies.

A little about me, I’m early 30’s, married, mom, Roman Catholic. Some interests include cooking, reading, gardening, sewing, embroidery, candle making, hiking, holistic health and beauty, Montessori parenting, homemaking, vintage mid-century/ Victorian/ classical art and aesthetic. My husband and I started doing a little amateur bird watching during the pandemic, inspired by Roosh. I have a vast collection of cookbooks which brings me great joy and inspired my moniker here.

Like many, I too have burned by the rot our society. The product of divorce in my early childhood and a strong independent mother who was a self serving feminist career woman. Paired with a public school education, unlimited access to tv (hello SATC!), and being largely left to my own devices, it’s no wonder that my early adulthood was filled with anger, confusion, and generally degenerate behavior.

By the grace of God I didn’t continue down that path. A strong desire for truth lead me home to Christ. I truly believe that my baptism, the short time I spent in Catholic school, and the prayers of my grandmother (she would pray the rosary with me before bed when she visited) saved my life. Thankfully I was able to wake up and get on the path to creating the life I enjoy today. Ask and you shall receive! Gods ways truly are best.

So many women today are suffering immensely. Trying to reconcile their true nature with a modern world that contradicts everything sacred. No wonder they are miserable. I am helpless seeing the pain of so many friends, but advice is unwelcome. I try only to live by example.

Misty & Entwife, what a great blessing you have in having married young! Departing from traditional wisdom it truly is frowned upon by pretty much everyone now. The main issue with marriage today is not being centered around Christ. Most people with negativity towards marriage (young or otherwise) really have a problem with the state of marriage today (unbeknownst to them). Young marriage being looked down on says more about the state of young people and the people who raised them than of marriage itself.

Misty, it’s so beautiful to hear how God healed your marriage and your heart.

Entwife, your story is very interesting and inspiring. I’m going to start a thread, ‘How did you find RVF, the red pill, and Christ’. I’d love to hear about more women’s stories. Your advice is sound, to approach the world as being inverted and it will help avoid the snares of the devil. I don’t want to fit in with modern society, I want to follow Christ. It might not win me the most friends, but I prefer to be fulfilled spiritually. The struggle for me right now is coming to terms that I think I have to let go of certain friendships. Like you, most people in my life are indifferent, openly subversive, or Christian in name only. My circle of friends is largely a hold over from long past days of my own degeneracy. We are blessed though to live in a very large traditional Catholic community. So we’ve been making more new friends which has been such a blessing for our family. It’s also the ultimate white pill to be surrounded by an abundance of Catholic families where 4 is considered a small amount of children (we only have 1 but pray we will be blessed with more).

I am very grateful to have met your virtual acquaintance. I look forward to more discussion.
Hi Virginiahouswife!

Welcome.

Good to see a few more us joining!

Your interests are very close to mine, I love to cook too!

You mentioned SATC, that show alone ruined many women. I used to watch it myself, appalling that it would ever interest me. Especially the fact that it normalized abortion and degenerate sex and everything else!

I too have a few friends I am trying to distance myself from, but I don't want them to think of me as holier-than -thou.
 

DelMarMisty

Newbie
Thank you, Roosh. And hello, ladies!

I've been a silent lurker since early 2014, and I'm pretty excited to find out about this new little corner of my favorite place on the internet where I can actually talk! It's especially reassuring given all the censorship and funny-business going on with all of the large platforms right now. I'm very grateful. And especially for the forum format. It is my favorite. I <3 old internet.

I am 34. Happily (re)married. Two adolescent sons (from first marriage). I also married young, the first time around, at 19. Pretty much everybody thought I was crazy. I just knew what I wanted. And I tried to do everything right, but was never taught how to navigate the liars, narcissists, abusers, etc., didn't really have anything resembling a solid religious teaching or a community to learn from. I dun' got had. My ex-husband reminds me of some of the women in the divorce horror stories here on RVF. :confused: The rest of his family is pretty sensible, though.

My own parents were dirty hippies (although they've made great strides in life and I love them dearly). My ancestors are all European and mostly Catholic. My parents both went to Catholic schools. I was raised in a Vaishnav household (subset of Hinduism). :hmm: Some New-Agey enlightenment nonsense going on there for sure. I have always considered myself a Christian, although I knew virtually nothing about Christianity until well into adulthood. It became extra-obvious when I tried to be an atheist for a few years and figured out exactly which God I was angry at (trite, perhaps, but TRUE).

The man God eventually set in my path when I finally got my head on straight and my compass pointed in the right direction is proof, to me, that God works miracles, even (and especially) for the fallen. Proof also that proud efforts are worth nothing next to prayers of humility.

Over the last few years, I've helped my husband open his own business, and he let me quit my job so I wouldn't have to put my boys in school (they've always been homeschooled, modern education is cancer). I don't like the word "lifestyle," but if I had to describe how we live, basically we are prepping to eventually build a rural homestead... but for now we live in a rented townhouse. Our budgets are small and our margins are tight, but our systems are good!

I truly enjoy and have a passion for pretty much all of the things feminists hate me for being good at: cooking, cleaning, baking, sewing, taking care of my family... and ALSO, these days, perversely: reading, writing, maths, sciency things, and winning at everything. They hate those the worst.

I consider myself Catholic, although what was going to be my first time ever attending Mass (many moons ago, now) was CANCELED thanks to "COVID." I suppose you could say I have so far FAILED to humble myself sufficiently to feel any kind of good about PREPENDING an additional ritual to my very first formal act of worship (mask on, name in book). I guess you could also say that I am in hiding. I am waiting. I am learning how to heal from some things, and learning how to use my gifts and talents to better serve the Lord.

I am DEFINITELY very happy to be among other traditionally-minded Christian women. Well met, all. :nerd
Welcome Kitty!

Wow, such interesting stories. Amen. Glory to God.

It seems that you always had Christ in your heart.

I was into New Age at one stage and came across a lot on Hinduism (of course), is it as bad as I have read in terms of demonic realms and occultism? I have a friend who is into Hinduism and goes to India to do different types of Yoga etc. She is so deeply immersed in it, every time I mentioned Jesus she gets almost angry (not outwardly) just her energy etc.

Looking forward to knowing more!
 
Hi Virginiahouswife!

Welcome.

Good to see a few more us joining!

Your interests are very close to mine, I love to cook too!

You mentioned SATC, that show alone ruined many women. I used to watch it myself, appalling that it would ever interest me. Especially the fact that it normalized abortion and degenerate sex and everything else!

I too have a few friends I am trying to distance myself from, but I don't want them to think of me as holier-than -thou.

Cooking is the best, isn’t it? I just love everything about it. The process...the reward...

SATC definitely contributed to a few of my dumber life choices, including wasting several years trying to live that hip city life. But honestly living that way woke me. I realized, nope this is horrible, these people are the worst. The show was all glamour and that’s all people are trying to emulate, but the truth is ugly.

I know exactly what you mean, and it’s tough. Cutting off friends who you still love, but can’t be your true self around. Like what’s the litmus? Do I get rid of all friends doing things completely abhorrent to God? Stop biting my tongue and let it sort itself out? Ghost people? The pain of letting go. On the other hand finding new friends is weird too. I love Jesus but we need that and some more stuff.
 
Thank you, Roosh. And hello, ladies!

I've been a silent lurker since early 2014, and I'm pretty excited to find out about this new little corner of my favorite place on the internet where I can actually talk! It's especially reassuring given all the censorship and funny-business going on with all of the large platforms right now. I'm very grateful. And especially for the forum format. It is my favorite. I <3 old internet.

I am 34. Happily (re)married. Two adolescent sons (from first marriage). I also married young, the first time around, at 19. Pretty much everybody thought I was crazy. I just knew what I wanted. And I tried to do everything right, but was never taught how to navigate the liars, narcissists, abusers, etc., didn't really have anything resembling a solid religious teaching or a community to learn from. I dun' got had. My ex-husband reminds me of some of the women in the divorce horror stories here on RVF. :confused: The rest of his family is pretty sensible, though.

My own parents were dirty hippies (although they've made great strides in life and I love them dearly). My ancestors are all European and mostly Catholic. My parents both went to Catholic schools. I was raised in a Vaishnav household (subset of Hinduism). :hmm: Some New-Agey enlightenment nonsense going on there for sure. I have always considered myself a Christian, although I knew virtually nothing about Christianity until well into adulthood. It became extra-obvious when I tried to be an atheist for a few years and figured out exactly which God I was angry at (trite, perhaps, but TRUE).

The man God eventually set in my path when I finally got my head on straight and my compass pointed in the right direction is proof, to me, that God works miracles, even (and especially) for the fallen. Proof also that proud efforts are worth nothing next to prayers of humility.

Over the last few years, I've helped my husband open his own business, and he let me quit my job so I wouldn't have to put my boys in school (they've always been homeschooled, modern education is cancer). I don't like the word "lifestyle," but if I had to describe how we live, basically we are prepping to eventually build a rural homestead... but for now we live in a rented townhouse. Our budgets are small and our margins are tight, but our systems are good!

I truly enjoy and have a passion for pretty much all of the things feminists hate me for being good at: cooking, cleaning, baking, sewing, taking care of my family... and ALSO, these days, perversely: reading, writing, maths, sciency things, and winning at everything. They hate those the worst.

I consider myself Catholic, although what was going to be my first time ever attending Mass (many moons ago, now) was CANCELED thanks to "COVID." I suppose you could say I have so far FAILED to humble myself sufficiently to feel any kind of good about PREPENDING an additional ritual to my very first formal act of worship (mask on, name in book). I guess you could also say that I am in hiding. I am waiting. I am learning how to heal from some things, and learning how to use my gifts and talents to better serve the Lord.

I am DEFINITELY very happy to be among other traditionally-minded Christian women. Well met, all. :nerd
Welcome Kitty!

This is a very difficult time to be trying to deepen your faith. My heart goes out to you. If there is a more rural parish you could try and see how it is. We go to a parish that does not require masks, most people don’t wear them. The first several pews are spaced (one open one closed) and the elderly and mask wearers sit there. I think it all depends on your state, the priest, and the parish. We were hesitant to get back, but we’ve been going since July and it’s been great having that back in our lives.

Well done on you, homeschooling! It’s an avenue we’re looking into too. I’m definitely going to keep our little one home for the foreseeable future. Homeschooling when they’re little just feels right. There’s a few private Catholic options in our area. Montessori methods feel very intuitive to me and they do the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd in traditional Montessori which lights the way for a personal relationship with Christ, which I really like.

I love all the anti-feminist things too! I have even developed a love for ironing! It’s satisfying and it feels so nice doing something for my family. We’re living on one income now too so I enjoy finding new ways to be frugal and make the most of what we have. It’s such a blessing to be a keeper at home!

Sidenote (keeper at home made me think of this) does anyone else follow The Transformed Wife on Facebook? She is very pro traditional femininity, Titus 2, based.
 
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Hello! I’m your typical ex feminist turned Christian conservative. Feminism and leftist idealism stripped me of my femininity, Christ lets me embrace it.

I had a great upbringing within in a loving household, and when I became a feminist things went very dark, very quickly. Leftism made me feel dead inside. I was broke, angry, self loathing, and I took no responsibility for my actions, because blaming the patriarchy was just so much easier. My past is very cringey. I cried for help and I received it. I became a dedicated yoga practitioner, and I still am to this day. I began to turn around by following the the yoga sutras. After numerous LSD trips, Jesus took my hand and led me to where I am now.

I now live on an island in the rainforest, surrounded by the glory of God. I am sober, celibate, debt free, and joyful. I am minimalist, frugal, mindful, no social media and limited cell phone service. I am that weird granola person that lives in the woods.

I am a fan of ROK and a consistent lurker of this site too. :)
 
Welcome Islandgirl!

Wow it sounds like you’re really living! How’s the weather on your island?

I completely relate to feeling dead inside when I was living as a feminist. It’s taken years to undo the brainwashing. You really nailed the feeling. A normal upbringing, how refreshing. Really highlights how vulnerable all young women are to being conned into feminism. You put it so well, in Christ you’re free you embrace your womanhood. So true. It’s those who have not experienced this truth who are oppressed!

I too have embraced sober living. I found alcohol was keeping me from a deeper relationship with the Lord and from being who I really want to be for my child (don’t get me started on mommy wine culture). It’s amazing how much better I feel and how the positive impact ripples. Now I just need to get on the no social media page.

Glad your weird-granola-woods-living-self is here. God bless you!
 
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EntWife

Newbie
Oh, islandgirl, how sad! I hope you continue to recover from your terrible experiences.

Here's an ancient prayer used by many Christians that will help if you say it, "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner."

The prayer acknowledges that you're a sinner who needs help, and that Jesus is your Lord and God who can give you the mercy you need.

You say that your past is cringey. Every time you think about it, or about things you wish you hadn't done, I'd encourage you to say the Jesus Prayer. I find that it's a way for my soul to cry to God without worrying about what I'm going to say. Plus a lot of times we simply don't know what we need. God often helps in unexpected ways that I never could have thought of. So I try not to get demanding, "God, I want this, this, and this! Please do such-and-such for me!", like He's a genie in a bottle.

That's what works best for me anyway. If you try it, I'm sure it will help you.
 
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EntWife

Newbie
Welcome to islandgirl and Kitty Tantrum! It's wonderful to have more ladies posting!

Kitty, this is one way in which the lack of guidance from parents is so devastating for girls/women. You would have been so much better off if your parents had gently helped you with the husband selection process. Not arranged marriage, of course, just helping you look over the prospects before you went so far as to fall in love. They may have noticed something off about your ex-husband that you missed because you were young and starry-eyed.

Whatever pain you went through, you got your sons from it. I'm sure it's hard to forgive your ex, but at least he gave you your sons. Having never been in your situation, I don't know if that helps. I hope so?

So far, I'm older than all you other ladies. (Early 40's.) I'm starting to feel a little mother henish. :)
 
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