Ladies lounge (women only)

TexasJenn

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Go to a Cato, or one of their sister stores? They always have white spaghetti strap simple slips.
I'm looking for just the right print or color - either something tropical and girly, or a beautiful color. I looked through about a hundred options and still didn't find the one. What can I say? I know what I like!

And thank you. He really was an answered prayer.
 

Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
pattern numbers of skirts

I don't even own a sewing machine again yet.
I apologize if I'm intruding in the conversation, but I just wanted to share what I do:

When I have a skirt I like, I make a "pattern" out of tissue paper (the big sheets, like for gift wrapping) by laying the skirt flat on a surface and tracing out the different panels on the tissue paper and then cutting them out. I've made a few skirts this way and they've actually come out well. Altering the measurements to make them longer, for example, is a little bit more tricky but it is possible as well. Eventually I reinforced the tissue paper with clear packing tape, and I have some patterns that have lasted me years.

Also, I don't own a sewing machine and hand sew everything. Time consuming, yes, but I find it relaxing in its own way. Since having children I have much less free time, but lately I've really been looking forward to making a skirt out of this beautifully colored fabric I found at the thrift store.
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I apologize if I'm intruding in the conversation, but I just wanted to share what I do:

When I have a skirt I like, I make a "pattern" out of tissue paper (the big sheets, like for gift wrapping) by laying the skirt flat on a surface and tracing out the different panels on the tissue paper and then cutting them out. I've made a few skirts this way and they've actually come out well. Altering the measurements to make them longer, for example, is a little bit more tricky but it is possible as well. Eventually I reinforced the tissue paper with clear packing tape, and I have some patterns that have lasted me years.

Also, I don't own a sewing machine and hand sew everything. Time consuming, yes, but I find it relaxing in its own way. Since having children I have much less free time, but lately I've really been looking forward to making a skirt out of this beautifully colored fabric I found at the thrift store.
Thank you! Definitely not an intrusion. It makes me feel more comfortable to try things when someone else tells me they have confidently managed to do the craftsmanship themselves.

I have seen hand stitch books from Alabama Chanin at the public library, and they have really lovely edging techniques. Everything they sell is hand stitched by a troupe of local artisans in their own homes, if the person doesn't want to hand sew it themselves. It's wild to me how expensive the clothes are for something that's so clearly re/upcycled. They do finish their own fabric from local organic cotton, too, though. Not a lot genuinely excites me, and the idea of having products made out of organic American cotton definitely thrills me.
 

Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
It makes me feel more comfortable to try things when someone else tells me they have confidently managed to do the craftsmanship themselves.
Me too. I went through an intense DIY phase (pre-children) when I was learning how to make all kinds of things. At the time no one could understand why - "buy you can just buy it!" - but times have sure changed (at least more overtly, I read a lot of conspiracy material back then and I'll just say I was not surprised or shocked by the developments of the past couple years).
They do finish their own fabric from local organic cotton, too, though. Not a lot genuinely excites me, and the idea of having products made out of organic American cotton definitely thrills me.
That sounds really nice. Unfortunately, most of my stuff is probably the made in China kind, but at least I usually buy second hand and help the globalists just a little bit less.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Woman
Other Christian
Awwww, how sweet!!! BTW, sorry for posting that ginormous stock photo of the glitter. I did it on my phone, didn't realize till I saw it on desktop how huge and watermarked it was :p


Cute! I've been looking on Shein for a short satin chemise/slip to wear as a gown. Love the plaid.

And I agree that sewing is fun and look forward to hearing about your projects.
Oh that's happened to me too when posting internet images on my phone
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Woman
Other Christian
I apologize if I'm intruding in the conversation, but I just wanted to share what I do:

When I have a skirt I like, I make a "pattern" out of tissue paper (the big sheets, like for gift wrapping) by laying the skirt flat on a surface and tracing out the different panels on the tissue paper and then cutting them out. I've made a few skirts this way and they've actually come out well. Altering the measurements to make them longer, for example, is a little bit more tricky but it is possible as well. Eventually I reinforced the tissue paper with clear packing tape, and I have some patterns that have lasted me years.

Also, I don't own a sewing machine and hand sew everything. Time consuming, yes, but I find it relaxing in its own way. Since having children I have much less free time, but lately I've really been looking forward to making a skirt out of this beautifully colored fabric I found at the thrift store.
Oh nice, you already have the fabric!

I like hand sewing too, I've been repairing clothing my whole life.
There's still lots of tricks and tips on 5 min crafts that I'm learning.

I will one day handsew a garment
 

Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
At first I didn't know what you were referring to, so I did a search.


Absolutely heartbreaking. Prayers for everyone that's been/being affected by this extreme weather.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Woman
Other Christian
I saw a theatre movie that had written warnings come up in the bottom right.

When a character was smoking the warning read "Smoking kills"

When a character was drinking alcohol, it read "Consumption of alcohol can be injurious to health" or a phrase similar to that.

As I was reading the English subtitles to understand the movie, I caught those words too.

The movie was produced in Pakistan and it was the fifth movie I've seen that was in Punjabi and this one also had Urdu.

I felt oddly satiated. I feel like I've met a need after seeing this.





These Punjabi Indian and Pakistani movies are interesting, funny, musical with choreographed dance and plots that reveal some very traditional ways of living. In each movie they juxtaposed tradition against Western lifestyles. Not even three lines into each movie and the characters refer to God, it is throughout the whole movie, the reference and deference to God, its wonderful to see God included in movies so much.

Very good experience for me.

They have been the most packed theatres of any movies I've gone to, except for the Man of God movie, which was also full.

I'm grateful for the ice cold air conditioning in theatres :)




I accept that as a woman, I am very susceptible to being influenced by my environment. And these movies have had an effect on me. I'll illustrate how.

I was in a office supply type store, and the Punjabi girl I asked to help me find the coloured duct tape at one point tilted her head back and forth more to the right when she explained why they had moved the rolls of tape. Without thinking, I mimiced her body language and then before I knew it, I was doing that hand chop/wave the open fingers move I've seen the movie characters do.

I guess I did it to empathise or commiserate with her a bit on all the rearranging they've been doing of the shelf items.

It doesn't take long to have culture affect a woman.
I've been listening to the Punjabi conversations on the buses but 5 movies is not quite enough to pick out words by ear yet.
 
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Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
I saw a theatre movie that had written warnings come up in the bottom right.

When a character was smoking the warning read "Smoking kills"

When a character was drinking alcohol, it read "Consumption of alcohol can be injurious to health" or a phrase similar to that.
That sounds really interesting.

It's the kind of innovation that could either be used for good (to warn people about imitative behavior when the plot of a movie requires showing undesirable or harmful behavior), or to further indoctrinate the viewers (for example, by "fact-checking" older movies that are not "woke").

Makes me wonder if they currently have a system like the former motion picture code in India.


Not even three lines into each movie and the characters refer to God, it is throughout the whole movie, the reference and deference to God, its wonderful to see God included in movies so much.
I don't know how to ask this tactfully, or in a way that doesn't sound "negative"...
Were they referring to God or a pagan idol?

No disrespect to anyone, but all the Indians or Punjabis I've met worshipped idols, if not atheist. We used to occasionally enjoy getting some Indian food, but since I've been a Christian I find all their idolatrous decorations at the restaurant unsettling. I had to learn to cook Indian food at home.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Woman
Other Christian
Thank you very much for the link to Hay's Code. That helped satisfy me too.

The other moviegoers read the same subtitles as me, they also read the name God when I read the name.

I unfortunately cannot cook Indian cuisine. I can't stand the smells nor some of the heavy spice use.
I'm grateful for the spice of cardamon and learning about the philosophy of using some spices to keep people 6 or more feet away(I read in a children's book that some kids were given pungent asafoetida to wear hanging from their neck so that others would keep their distance....is this purely fictional?)

I find Indian spices fascinating but only to try once kind of thing.

Unfortunately, I cannot submit in an Indian marriage as I will not cook this cuisine.
 
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Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
Thank you very much for the link to Hay's Code. That helped satisfy me too.
I was rereading over it, and I thought for sure it had something in it about depicting smoking and drinking in films, which is why your post reminded me of it, but apparently it doesn't. Must have been something else, but similar.

learning about the philosophy of using some spices to keep people 6 or more feet away (I read in a children's book that some kids were given pungent asafoetida to wear hanging from their neck so that others would keep their distance....is this purely fictional?)
For some reason that made me laugh a little.

But I don't know if it's fictional - I've never cooked with that spice before, but I looked it up and apparently it's known colloquially as "devil's dung", among other forum innapropriate names. So I could see it being true. Do you remember which book it was?

Apparently during the Italian renaissance it was used during exorcisms (according to wikipedia, can't verify the primary source, as it's a book).


But yeah, I haven't used that spice, I mostly just make tikka masala, which apparently is not "true" Indian food, but comes from Bangladeshi chefs living in Great Britain. I was introduced to it in an Indian restaurant, but I suppose it's made for our westernized tastes. Oh well, it's delicious regardless and our kids actually like curry.

Unfortunately, I cannot submit in an Indian marriage as I will not cook this cuisine

I remember watching a cooking show and one of the contestants was a white lady who married an Indian man and all she ever cooked was curries. It must be difficult at first having to always cook ethnic food that one didn't grow up familiar with. Especially if it has to pass the approval of his mother.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Woman
Other Christian
I was rereading over it, and I thought for sure it had something in it about depicting smoking and drinking in films, which is why your post reminded me of it, but apparently it doesn't. Must have been something else, but similar.


For some reason that made me laugh a little.

But I don't know if it's fictional - I've never cooked with that spice before, but I looked it up and apparently it's known colloquially as "devil's dung", among other forum innapropriate names. So I could see it being true. Do you remember which book it was?

Apparently during the Italian renaissance it was used during exorcisms (according to wikipedia, can't verify the primary source, as it's a book).


But yeah, I haven't used that spice, I just make tikka masala, which apparently is not "true" Indian food, but comes from Bangladeshi chefs living in Great Britain. I was introduced to it in an Indian restaurant, but I suppose it's made for our westernized tastes. Oh well, it's delicious regardless and our kids actually like curry.



I remember watching a cooking show and one of the contestants was a white lady who married an Indian man and all she ever cooked was curries. It must be difficult at first having to always cook ethnic food that one didn't grow up familiar with. Especially if it has to pass the approval of his mother.
Good point about passing approval of his mother, I have never got to that stage in a relationship...my exfiance and I, we rarely got together with his mother...in the 10 months we were engaged, I saw her once and it was at a function where the food was ordered in.
There was massive distance between residences.
I tried to display helpfulness by cleaning up after everyone but I've never had the chance or closeness to have a boyfriend's mother try my food. Interesting to think of today!

I was tring to remember whch children's book but I can't
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
Good point about passing approval of his mother, I have never got to that stage in a relationship...my exfiance and I, we rarely got together with his mother...in the 10 months we were engaged, I saw her once and it was at a function where the food was ordered in.
There was massive distance between residences.
I tried to display helpfulness by cleaning up after everyone but I've never had the chance or closeness to have a boyfriend's mother try my food. Interesting to think of today!
I haven't ever dated anyone outside of my very white Southern Protestant Anglo culture, but I imagine I would have to get lessons directly from their mother if they were anything other.
I have had practice with most cuisine except for Eastern European and African. My dad used to cook with me, as well as my children's father. It's one of my favorite bonding experiences.
 

Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
Good point about passing approval of his mother, I have never got to that stage in a relationship...my exfiance and I, we rarely got together with his mother...in the 10 months we were engaged, I saw her once and it was at a function where the food was ordered in.
There was massive distance between residences.
I tried to display helpfulness by cleaning up after everyone but I've never had the chance or closeness to have a boyfriend's mother try my food. Interesting to think of today!
My husband's mother has not ever eaten anything I've cooked, now that I think about it. We've barbecued, but that was more my husband cooking.

I tend to cook "healthy" food, so that may have something to do with it. Mother-in-laws can be difficult, I'll leave it at that...

I agree with helping clean up and trying to be helpful.
I have had practice with most cuisine except for Eastern European and African. My dad used to cook with me, as well as my children's father. It's one of my favorite bonding experiences.
That's pretty neat.

I sometimes miss the time before kids when I used to spend hours experimenting in the kitchen. Now I'm running back and forth from the kitchen to make sure the kids aren't beating each other up while I'm cooking, so I tend to cook the meals I have on "autopilot". It stopped being a means of self-expression and creativity and became solely to keep us fed.
I would love to make a quilt someday!
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
My mother "quilted" by hand-sewing squares of fabric together from scraps of fabric she had left from sewing our clothes. They are very precious to me. She taught me at a young age. It is easy to do, as she would then lay a larger solid solid piece of fabric for the bottom on the floor, a thin batting or other old thin blanket, then the pieced top. After pinning them together we'd use a heavy needle to make a knot with yarn at each intersection of the squares. To finish she folded the bottom edge over the top to look like a binding and whip stitch it on. I can still look at it and recognize our old dresses and the corner where she embroidered the date and her name.
 

TexasJenn

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Hey ladies! A chick on Instagram has a giveaway for all kinds of quilting stuff! If you're into that sort of thing. :) I love her style, and it's one that really lends itself well to using remnants.
Someday I'm going to learn how to make a quilt. My mom grew up on a farm, and her mother handmade a quilt for each of her THIRTEEN kids. They're so beautiful, and soft from decades of use, have held up very well.
 
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