Lifter's Lounge

Apologies for choosing the lazy route as I am sure similar question has already been asked and answered but this thread is 250 pages long so...

Anyhow, I am thinking of starting lifting but I've never done it before properly. I had been active in my teens and 20s, played football (soccer) in amateur clubs for quite a long time and liked sports in general although I've never been into lifting or gym workouts. I am now almost 40 and since the knee injury some 10 years ago my fitness levels have been low and I've gained some weight too. Over the last year or so I managed to get into a better shape by eating healthier and being more active (although there is still huge room for improvement there). For the last couple of weeks I started doing push-ups, squats and other exercises routinely.
So, the questions are:
- what kind of equipment should I go for so I can extend my daily routine with a bit of lifting (dumbbells? barbell?)
- what are the best routines for a beginner? Like I said, I had never done lifting so I'd rather make it properly without risking an injury
- an extra routine to strengthen my knee would be nice

As it's most likely a duplicate, PMs with suggestions are more than fine! Thanks!

These things are great, they're threaded dumbbells. You can add or subtract weight at will and you're not stuck with a huge set of hex weights taking up a bunch of space. I've seen them in pretty much every sporting goods store I've been to.

 
Find a proper lifting gym. Talk to the owner or trainer there. Ask them to program you a 12 week session, and have them sit in on your first couple of workouts to teach you basic form. It should cost around $300-400. While that may feel expensive, it is totally worth it. I floundered around lifting until I got a proper workout plan.

the problem with offering a generic workout plan (5*5, starting strength, etc) is it will not be tailored to your particular goals and body.

I want to agree in principle, but I'd add that some coaches are legitimately clueless when it comes to training novices. For a while I trained at a gym owned by a guy who was the USAPL national champion for his weight class. He was training two noobs for about a year, and they made roughly as much progress as he did. Because he put them on routines designed for advanced lifters for whom a 25lb gain on their squat in a year is serious progress. Both of the trainees got bored of lifting and quit.

If they'd done an off-the-shelf beginner program like stronglifts or starting strength, they'd have made decent progress in a much shorter time frame, and might have stuck with lifting. From what I've seen, the liner progression approach works really well for a few weeks/months, and it's not till after that that individual differences matter much. Unless your goal is marathon running or something where being strong is a hindrance, I think the cookie cutters are a good place to start.
 

godfather dust

Ostrich
Gold Member
I've been doing a very simple routine due to my gym being closed in a small setup I put in a relatives basement a couple miles away. Bench and dumbbells (changeable weights.) My gym was closed but semi-reopened yesterday with pretty bad restrictions (expect it to close again in faggot Bolshevik Massachusetts.)


Here's what I've been doing:
Day one push
Incline bench to 3 times
Shoulder press 3 times
Flat bench 3 times
Pec fly 3 times
More sets if necessary

Day 2 pull
Curls 3 times
Back thing 3 times (don't know name but you raise your arms by your sides)
Hammer curls 3 times
More sets if necessary

Day 3
Squat once
Calf raises once
Lunge once
All with weights, repeat 5-6 times

Repeat day 4-6

Rest day 7

Any recommendations for things to add with my limited equipment?
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
I want to agree in principle, but I'd add that some coaches are legitimately clueless when it comes to training novices. For a while I trained at a gym owned by a guy who was the USAPL national champion for his weight class. He was training two noobs for about a year, and they made roughly as much progress as he did. Because he put them on routines designed for advanced lifters for whom a 25lb gain on their squat in a year is serious progress. Both of the trainees got bored of lifting and quit.

If they'd done an off-the-shelf beginner program like stronglifts or starting strength, they'd have made decent progress in a much shorter time frame, and might have stuck with lifting. From what I've seen, the liner progression approach works really well for a few weeks/months, and it's not till after that that individual differences matter much. Unless your goal is marathon running or something where being strong is a hindrance, I think the cookie cutters are a good place to start.
Agree that not all coaches are the same. It's important to find a trainer you're comfortable with, and it's a reasonable thing to shop around. It's no different than finding a barber, or doctor, or accountant that you like and trust.

The issue with stronglifts or starting strength is they don't work for everyone, and they are not good for people with injuries. A squat/bench/front-bar deadlift/ clean/ pendlay row / overhead press is also far from an optimal approach. If you have a knee injury, squatting without accessory exercises are going to cause you to overcompensate and that's a recipe for disaster. I would rather have a beginner start on hexbar deadlifts rather than front-bar deadlifts to protect the back. Cleans or any other Olympic lift aren't necessary or optimal for beginners and is more a niche exercise. The barbell overhead press is not really a good pressing exercise. If you have a weak chest, there are many other exercises that will develop your chest quicker than a bench press.

The other issue with those one-size-fits-all approach is they don't provide you with the same level of confidence as a personalized schedule. When you start training as a beginner, there's so many things that you need to consider: proper diet, proper form, proper equipment, and even showing up on a regular schedule. You don't want to have doubts about your own program. If you have a trainer, then that's one less variable you have to worry about. A good trainer will also work with you to modify your program if it isn't working for you. If you find your program boring or that it isn't working, talk to your trainer and change it up.

I can provide my own anecdotal experience. I followed starting strength and stronglifts for about 4 years and made very little progress. I mean, I looked like I never lifted a day in my life. The past 2 years I have been using programs by a bodybuilder/powerlifter and have improved in my strength and fitness immensely. Only now do I know enough about strength and training that I can modify my program on my own to target certain goals. I honestly look back at all the wasted time on garbage exercises and schedules and shake my head.
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
I've been doing a very simple routine due to my gym being closed in a small setup I put in a relatives basement a couple miles away. Bench and dumbbells (changeable weights.) My gym was closed but semi-reopened yesterday with pretty bad restrictions (expect it to close again in faggot Bolshevik Massachusetts.)


Here's what I've been doing:
Day one push
Incline bench to 3 times
Shoulder press 3 times
Flat bench 3 times
Pec fly 3 times
More sets if necessary

Day 2 pull
Curls 3 times
Back thing 3 times (don't know name but you raise your arms by your sides)
Hammer curls 3 times
More sets if necessary

Day 3
Squat once
Calf raises once
Lunge once
All with weights, repeat 5-6 times

Repeat day 4-6

Rest day 7

Any recommendations for things to add with my limited equipment?
You only have a bench and dumbbells'? How much weight do you have to load your bench? Do you have a squat rack?
 

LoveBug

Kingfisher
Some of these programs sound arduous, no wonder why a lot of folks give up

I follow Doug McGuff’s one set of 5 core lifts, every 7-10 days (overhead press, bench, squat, dead, bent over barbell row which can be alternated with other lifts))

Good program for the lazy. 7-10 minutes every 7-10 days.

He has some science why multiple reps and multiple times a week isn’t overly beneficial, but that’s just his vantage point
 
These things are great, they're threaded dumbbells. You can add or subtract weight at will and you're not stuck with a huge set of hex weights taking up a bunch of space. I've seen them in pretty much every sporting goods store I've been to.


I have a pair of these that are 5-100 pounds and serve me well. Only complaint is that I was getting metal splinters in my hand from the handle, which I solved by wrapping hockey tape around them. I hate leg exercises with dumbbells though so that’s a little behind the rest of my program, which is Jeremy Ethier’s “Built With Science” program. Very happy with the results.
 
Some of these programs sound arduous, no wonder why a lot of folks give up

I follow Doug McGuff’s one set of 5 core lifts, every 7-10 days (overhead press, bench, squat, dead, bent over barbell row which can be alternated with other lifts))

Good program for the lazy. 7-10 minutes every 7-10 days.

He has some science why multiple reps and multiple times a week isn’t overly beneficial, but that’s just his vantage point

Could you share the data: starting numbers, current numbers, and how long you've been doing the program?
 

LoveBug

Kingfisher
Could you share the data: starting numbers, current numbers, and how long you've been doing the program?

6 months. Its difficult to put a weight increase on it, because I've done my reps in a different, slower cadence (to enlist as many muscle fibers as possible). I used to just rifle through my reps, McGuff teaches that moving faster diminishes gains. So now I go as slow as I can without it being unnatural with my reps to muscle failure, which is less weight than I could lift going faster. Im happy with how bigger I feel though
 

Aboulia

Robin
Agree that not all coaches are the same. It's important to find a trainer you're comfortable with, and it's a reasonable thing to shop around. It's no different than finding a barber, or doctor, or accountant that you like and trust.

The issue with stronglifts or starting strength is they don't work for everyone, and they are not good for people with injuries. A squat/bench/front-bar deadlift/ clean/ pendlay row / overhead press is also far from an optimal approach. If you have a knee injury, squatting without accessory exercises are going to cause you to overcompensate and that's a recipe for disaster. I would rather have a beginner start on hexbar deadlifts rather than front-bar deadlifts to protect the back. Cleans or any other Olympic lift aren't necessary or optimal for beginners and is more a niche exercise. The barbell overhead press is not really a good pressing exercise. If you have a weak chest, there are many other exercises that will develop your chest quicker than a bench press.

The other issue with those one-size-fits-all approach is they don't provide you with the same level of confidence as a personalized schedule. When you start training as a beginner, there's so many things that you need to consider: proper diet, proper form, proper equipment, and even showing up on a regular schedule. You don't want to have doubts about your own program. If you have a trainer, then that's one less variable you have to worry about. A good trainer will also work with you to modify your program if it isn't working for you. If you find your program boring or that it isn't working, talk to your trainer and change it up.

I can provide my own anecdotal experience. I followed starting strength and stronglifts for about 4 years and made very little progress. I mean, I looked like I never lifted a day in my life. The past 2 years I have been using programs by a bodybuilder/powerlifter and have improved in my strength and fitness immensely. Only now do I know enough about strength and training that I can modify my program on my own to target certain goals. I honestly look back at all the wasted time on garbage exercises and schedules and shake my head.

You're correct on the notion that accessory work is needed to address weak points, especially from prior injury. It's rather silly to think that a beginner program will cover all the bases for long term. 4 years is too long to do SS/SL. And they're not the same program since SS uses a power clean and SL uses the barbell row. If I remember correctly, one of those programs states that once you fail several times, you move onto more advanced systems with a slower progression like Madcow. Which will be less than a year, because nobody OHP's 5x200+ pounds in their first year. I don't think I ever got past 1x135 with it to be honest.

Proper form is addressed when reading SS, since it goes into depth about form, if you have some awareness of your own body, and perhaps a mirror to check form, you should have zero issues, the only thing that you may have is flexibility issues for proper form, which aren't addressed, you have to get that elsewhere, I personally found Pavel Tsatsouline's Relax Into Stretch quite helpful. Powerlifting and bodybuilding are mutually exclusive classes, Powerlifters attempt to get the largest lifts with the lowest weight, and bodybuilders focus on aesthetics over strength, so I'm not exactly sure how you do a combination of the two.

As for the other things you mentioned a trainer for, diet is largely irrelevant as a beginner. Prepare normal meals, and don't eat lots of garbage, nor forbid yourself from eating the odd treat. If you can't hold to a schedule a trainer won't help you, and if you don't know the literature, you won't know if you have a good trainer or not.

I recently got a pair of Fat Gripz, they are a game changer. I already have a better than average grip, I never lose grip on deadlifts, my 'pull' fails before my grip does. Still, I have been wanting to get back to grip strength training and the Fat Gripz are a great way to add a new stimulus into movements you are already doing.

Can't agree more with this, I always finished my workouts doing DLs using 3.0" Alpha grips, before I quit lifting, and my max double overhand DL was 380x1.
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
And they're not the same program since SS uses a power clean and SL uses the barbell row.
I know they are not the same program.

Powerlifting and bodybuilding are mutually exclusive classes, Powerlifters attempt to get the largest lifts with the lowest weight, and bodybuilders focus on aesthetics over strength,
Wow, really? Thanks for the information buddy.

so I'm not exactly sure how you do a combination of the two.
And yet he does it. Shocking, no?

As for the other things you mentioned a trainer for, diet is largely irrelevant as a beginner. Prepare normal meals, and don't eat lots of garbage, nor forbid yourself from eating the odd treat. If you can't hold to a schedule a trainer won't help you, and if you don't know the literature, you won't know if you have a good trainer or not.
Diet is not irrelevant, and I didn't say a trainer would help you with holding a schedule. Go back and re-read my post instead of assuming what's in my post.
 

get2choppaaa

Woodpecker
Agree that not all coaches are the same. It's important to find a trainer you're comfortable with, and it's a reasonable thing to shop around. It's no different than finding a barber, or doctor, or accountant that you like and trust.

The issue with stronglifts or starting strength is they don't work for everyone, and they are not good for people with injuries. A squat/bench/front-bar deadlift/ clean/ pendlay row / overhead press is also far from an optimal approach. If you have a knee injury, squatting without accessory exercises are going to cause you to overcompensate and that's a recipe for disaster. I would rather have a beginner start on hexbar deadlifts rather than front-bar deadlifts to protect the back. Cleans or any other Olympic lift aren't necessary or optimal for beginners and is more a niche exercise. The barbell overhead press is not really a good pressing exercise. If you have a weak chest, there are many other exercises that will develop your chest quicker than a bench press.

The other issue with those one-size-fits-all approach is they don't provide you with the same level of confidence as a personalized schedule. When you start training as a beginner, there's so many things that you need to consider: proper diet, proper form, proper equipment, and even showing up on a regular schedule. You don't want to have doubts about your own program. If you have a trainer, then that's one less variable you have to worry about. A good trainer will also work with you to modify your program if it isn't working for you. If you find your program boring or that it isn't working, talk to your trainer and change it up.

I can provide my own anecdotal experience. I followed starting strength and stronglifts for about 4 years and made very little progress. I mean, I looked like I never lifted a day in my life. The past 2 years I have been using programs by a bodybuilder/powerlifter and have improved in my strength and fitness immensely. Only now do I know enough about strength and training that I can modify my program on my own to target certain goals. I honestly look back at all the wasted time on garbage exercises and schedules and shake my head.
Going to present a differing a different view on this one. Starting Strength or any consistent Barbell Program will produce major gains to beginners, especially when they maintain schedule wit the calories and routine and follow basic linear progression. Once you become an intermediate (2xbw squat, 1.5 bw bench. 2x bw DL,) then you need more nuance and actually know what you're doing... but for most people a Starting Strenght linear progression, while not sexy, will work very well. I think its important to consider that while you/I may know what works for you now, we had to learn by doing the things that didn't work optimally

Training my girlfriend currently. She started lifting weights last year and had a personal trainer. Gyms closed with Covid so she started lifting with me. Equipment was all new to her as she only had used machines at the globo gym and is Barbell (Safety Squat Bar, American Cambered Bar/Power Bar), Rack, reverse Hyper, Bench/DB's.

She has a hard time gaining weight and is naturally thin. She also has issues with knee pain/torn meniscus ect.... so was afraid to do any squatting except in a smith machine. We fixed that with wide stance, knees out squatting that didnt shoot the knees forward (so not Olympic style and not SS style, but focusing on a vertical shin with an upright torso). I forced her to learn how to bench/squat/deadlift/row correctly. She has gained 10 lbs in 6 months, (I've gained 25) With increased calories, and trying to increase each lift 5 lbs a work out. 5x5 for the main compound lifts and 3-4 sets of 12-15 for the accessories.

Basic Program is below, and you change the exercise every 3 weeks or so. This is more in the template of a Conjugate Program. But frankly getting strong in the classic lifts will result in muscle gains as a product of strength.

2 x upper days:
1 Press/Bench Press/Incline Press/Press variation
2 Tricep work (skull crushers/JM Press/Dips
3 Row/Pull Ups/DB ROW/Seal Row
4 Shrugs/Upright Row/Face Pulls
5 Hammer Curl/Supinated Curl bicep work

2x Lower Days
1 Squat Variation (Box Squat/Front Squat/SSB Squat)
2 Good Morning/Dealdlift
3 Hamstring (ultra high banded hamstrng curls/RDL/Reverse Hypers)
4 Calf work
5 Abs

Goal is to keep the workout to no longer than 70 mins, and to increase training density in each work out.

I think the biggest thing that makes a program like the above work is that it produces results. 5 lbs a week in a given exercise will result in 20 lbs a month... Now clearly you cant linearly progress forever, but folks shouldn't underestimate the benefit of 5lbs a week increases. ,
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
Going to present a differing a different view on this one. Starting Strength or any consistent Barbell Program will produce major gains to beginners, especially when they maintain schedule wit the calories and routine and follow basic linear progression. Once you become an intermediate (2xbw squat, 1.5 bw bench. 2x bw DL,) then you need more nuance and actually know what you're doing... but for most people a Starting Strenght linear progression, while not sexy, will work very well. I think its important to consider that while you/I may know what works for you now, we had to learn by doing the things that didn't work optimally

Training my girlfriend currently. She started lifting weights last year and had a personal trainer. Gyms closed with Covid so she started lifting with me. Equipment was all new to her as she only had used machines at the globo gym and is Barbell (Safety Squat Bar, American Cambered Bar/Power Bar), Rack, reverse Hyper, Bench/DB's.

She has a hard time gaining weight and is naturally thin. She also has issues with knee pain/torn meniscus ect.... so was afraid to do any squatting except in a smith machine. We fixed that with wide stance, knees out squatting that didnt shoot the knees forward (so not Olympic style and not SS style, but focusing on a vertical shin with an upright torso). I forced her to learn how to bench/squat/deadlift/row correctly. She has gained 10 lbs in 6 months, (I've gained 25) With increased calories, and trying to increase each lift 5 lbs a work out. 5x5 for the main compound lifts and 3-4 sets of 12-15 for the accessories.

Basic Program is below, and you change the exercise every 3 weeks or so. This is more in the template of a Conjugate Program. But frankly getting strong in the classic lifts will result in muscle gains as a product of strength.

2 x upper days:
1 Press/Bench Press/Incline Press/Press variation
2 Tricep work (skull crushers/JM Press/Dips
3 Row/Pull Ups/DB ROW/Seal Row
4 Shrugs/Upright Row/Face Pulls
5 Hammer Curl/Supinated Curl bicep work

2x Lower Days
1 Squat Variation (Box Squat/Front Squat/SSB Squat)
2 Good Morning/Dealdlift
3 Hamstring (ultra high banded hamstrng curls/RDL/Reverse Hypers)
4 Calf work
5 Abs

Goal is to keep the workout to no longer than 70 mins, and to increase training density in each work out.

I think the biggest thing that makes a program like the above work is that it produces results. 5 lbs a week in a given exercise will result in 20 lbs a month... Now clearly you cant linearly progress forever, but folks shouldn't underestimate the benefit of 5lbs a week increases. ,
The program you have is not Starting Strength or Strong Lifts. In fact, all you have done is provided a program for your girlfriend based on her experience and body and then monitored her throughout her workouts, which is the exact same thing I was advocating with a trainer.

Also, on another note, I wouldn't bring your girlfriend to the gym. I've been going to the gym for 8 years now, and I have seen my fair share of eager young guys bringing their girlfriend to the gym with them. I assume they do it to make their girlfriend sexier and more fit. It always backfires on them. Why? 1) It takes away time, effort, and dedication from their own training. 2) It literally advertises their girlfriend to other men in the most testosterone-fueled location possible. 3) It "activates" their girlfriend's hypergamy. While you may be big and strong, there is always a guy out there who is bigger, stronger, and better looking, and your girlfriend will notice.

Also, women have no business in the gym doing strength training. They don't need strength like men. They don't need high testosterone to stay healthy and focused like men. Women only go to the gym to get fat butts and to flirt with men. They are a distraction and often ruin the culture of the gym. If they need exercise, they should be doing cardio or yoga with other women.
 
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get2choppaaa

Woodpecker
The program you have is not Starting Strength or Strong Lifts. In fact, all you have done is provided a program for your girlfriend based on her experience and body and then monitored her throughout her workouts, which is the exact same thing I was advocating with a trainer.

Also, on another note, I wouldn't bring your girlfriend to the gym. I've been going to the gym for 8 years now, and I have seen my fair share of eager young guys bringing their girlfriend to the gym with them. I assume they do it to make their girlfriend sexier and more fit. It always backfires on them. Why? 1) It takes away time, effort, and dedication from their own training. 2) It literally advertises their girlfriend to other men in the most testosterone-fueled location possible. 3) It "activates" their girlfriend's hypergamy. While you may be big and strong, there is always a guy out there who is bigger, stronger, and better looking, and your girlfriend will notice.

Also, women have no business in the gym doing strength training. They don't need strength like men. They don't need high testosterone to stay healthy and focused like men. Women only go to the gym to get fat butts and to flirt with men. They are a distraction and often ruin the culture of the gym. If they need exercise, they should be doing cardio or yoga with other women.

Yes, I clearly stated it was not SL or SS. My point is that basic barbell lifts work well for beginners, (can be SS//SL/ 5-3-1/ect)and adding free weight assistance exercises for single joint hypertrophy purposes are good, but secondary to compound lifts. Learning to do the classic lifts correctly is the best way to build muscle. We are saying the same thing about having experience and nuance, but my point is that with most people who are not experienced, a BB program is sufficient provided consistency/caloric intake. I think you are correct that once you know what works optimally for you, that you go with that, but most people dont get into complicated things like Perilipin's chart, reading Mel Sif's Supertraining, Louie Simmons books/ Scott Stevnson Fortitude Training ect.....

Regarding the girls in the gym thing, I hear you, but this is a product of people in weak relationships. If you're with a woman who is oriented towards that and has a propensity to engage in infidelity, you're asking for trouble. I suppose the same logic would be, : I don't want my gf to go to a bar/restaurant/beach with me because she will be advertised and might get swooped up. To me its a fear based mentality. I've been divorced and am fully aware of the nature of hypergamy... but the attitude of "if you think you can do better go ahead" coupled with the fact that I only date women who have conservative, Christian natures seems to be a pretty good . Going to the gym with your girlfriend is perfectly fine, if she has a serious attitude about training, you aint gotta worry. If she is there trolling for dick, you're already screwed. I have always used a shared physical fitness as an element of bonding with the women I have been with. Lifting is important to me, physical fitness is important to a woman I am with.

Regarding your last paragraph with women doing strength training, I completely disagree. If you have a 100lb woman, who is thin, building 10 lbs of muscle and increasing bone density will directly result in her having a better quality of life both in her youth and in the next decades as she ages. Same reason why gaining as much muscle in your youth is paramount to prevent dynapenia and sarcopenia. If your mother is 70 and she wants to be able to hold her grandkids, learning to deadlift will help her quality of life. If you want an all male gym culture, find a hardcore gym/powerlifting gym or better yet, do what I did, spend the 4K and buy the stuff and put it in your house. I'll never go to another public gym again as I hate public gyms and cant stand people being selfish/stupid on equipment (curling in the squat rack). The cardio/yoga comment is totally incorrect and I am sure a joke. Women doing roids = unfeminine. Women building muscle, perfectly healthy and attractive to MOST men provided she doesn't go overboard and maintains some healthy bodyfat. When I did go to a public gym, I saw a lot of girls working on their fitness levels trying to better themselves, nothing wrong with that, and if a girl wants a bigger butt, that's no different than every dude out there wanting bigger arms. As far as them ruining the culture, I don't approve of leggings and twat flashing, but having a women in the gym working out isn't an issue for me. Now Instagram whores who are filming themselves the whole time, yea those people suck, but girls who are serious about a training program, I'm all for... you just gotta cover your vag/butt when wearing leggings, that is too much... As far as talking goes, after my work out was over, I'd go talk to them, but only after I had already completed my training routine.
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
My point is that basic barbell lifts work well for beginners, (can be SS//SL/ 5-3-1/ect)and adding free weight assistance exercises for single joint hypertrophy purposes are good, but secondary to compound lifts. Learning to do the classic lifts correctly is the best way to build muscle. We are saying the same thing about having experience and nuance, but my point is that with most people who are not experienced, a BB program is sufficient provided consistency/caloric intake. I think you are correct that once you know what works optimally for you, that you go with that, but most people dont get into complicated things like Perilipin's chart, reading Mel Sif's Supertraining, Louie Simmons books/ Scott Stevnson Fortitude Training ect.....
Basic barbell lifts are great. My argument was hiring a trainer to provide you with a schedule is more beneficial to a beginner than simply following SS/SL without any guidance.

Regarding the girls in the gym thing, I hear you, but this is a product of people in weak relationships. If you're with a woman who is oriented towards that and has a propensity to engage in infidelity, you're asking for trouble. I suppose the same logic would be, : I don't want my gf to go to a bar/restaurant/beach with me because she will be advertised and might get swooped up. To me its a fear based mentality. I've been divorced and am fully aware of the nature of hypergamy... but the attitude of "if you think you can do better go ahead" coupled with the fact that I only date women who have conservative, Christian natures seems to be a pretty good . Going to the gym with your girlfriend is perfectly fine, if she has a serious attitude about training, you aint gotta worry. If she is there trolling for dick, you're already screwed. I have always used a shared physical fitness as an element of bonding with the women I have been with. Lifting is important to me, physical fitness is important to a woman I am with.
Nah, if you bring your wife or girlfriend to the gym, you might as well take her to the club with you. It's simp behaviour. Sorry, man, don't want to be mean to you because you seem like a good guy, but I have to shoot straight from the hip on this topic.

Regarding your last paragraph with women doing strength training, I completely disagree. If you have a 100lb woman, who is thin, building 10 lbs of muscle and increasing bone density will directly result in her having a better quality of life both in her youth and in the next decades as she ages. Same reason why gaining as much muscle in your youth is paramount to prevent dynapenia and sarcopenia. If your mother is 70 and she wants to be able to hold her grandkids, learning to deadlift will help her quality of life. If you want an all male gym culture, find a hardcore gym/powerlifting gym or better yet, do what I did, spend the 4K and buy the stuff and put it in your house. I'll never go to another public gym again as I hate public gyms and cant stand people being selfish/stupid on equipment (curling in the squat rack). The cardio/yoga comment is totally incorrect and I am sure a joke. Women doing roids = unfeminine. Women building muscle, perfectly healthy and attractive to MOST men provided she doesn't go overboard and maintains some healthy bodyfat. When I did go to a public gym, I saw a lot of girls working on their fitness levels trying to better themselves, nothing wrong with that, and if a girl wants a bigger butt, that's no different than every dude out there wanting bigger arms. As far as them ruining the culture, I don't approve of leggings and twat flashing, but having a women in the gym working out isn't an issue for me. Now Instagram whores who are filming themselves the whole time, yea those people suck, but girls who are serious about a training program, I'm all for... you just gotta cover your vag/butt when wearing leggings, that is too much... As far as talking goes, after my work out was over, I'd go talk to them, but only after I had already completed my training routine.
Nah, women don't need strength training. If they want to build muscle, they can do so around the house doing domestic duties. Women attending the gym for strength training is a product of feminism. Women go to the gym to get fat butts, to flirt, and to cause drama. If she really needs to lose fat, she can go for a run. If she needs extra flexibility to bear children, she can go to yoga.
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
I used to know, in my heathen days, an absolute bodybuilding Chad, who would fornicate with every thot who entered the gym. I also watched "committed" women that came with the boyfriend to the gym, who, a year later, would be passed around the gym like a joint. I have also watched very good lifters quit because of the drama women would cause in the gym (sleep with them and then their best friend, for example). I hold Nurmagomedov, a devote Muslim and one of the best MMA fighters, as an idol of what every strength athlete and fighter should do. Praise God, work out with other men in his family and friend circle, and keep women at home, taking care of the kids and family. Unfortunately, in the Babylon West, this type of approach, which worked successfully for thousands of years, and which obviously works for Nurmagomedov, is unthinkably sexist. So, now you have thots in their tight spandex pants and bras doing occasionally squats and hip thrusts, while they chat up 3-4 men at a time, and these simps stop training and get involved in female drama. Sad to watch. When I go to the gym now, I plug in my headphones, rip through my sets, and leave.
 

get2choppaaa

Woodpecker
Basic barbell lifts are great. My argument was hiring a trainer to provide you with a schedule is more beneficial to a beginner than simply following SS/SL without any guidance.


Nah, if you bring your wife or girlfriend to the gym, you might as well take her to the club with you. It's simp behaviour. Sorry, man, don't want to be mean to you because you seem like a good guy, but I have to shoot straight from the hip on this topic.


Nah, women don't need strength training. If they want to build muscle, they can do so around the house doing domestic duties. Women attending the gym for strength training is a product of feminism. Women go to the gym to get fat butts, to flirt, and to cause drama. If she really needs to lose fat, she can go for a run. If she needs extra flexibility to bear children, she can go to yoga.

I dont mind criticism but you're completely off on this one. I very much assure you there is zero Simpishness about my behavior. For context I dont believe in Women's' Suffrage, I am strongly anti-feminist, am fully aware of the hypergamous nature of women who are not grounded in Christian beliefs, and have lived the first hand experience of the effects of feminist divorce rape immediately after returning from an overseas deployment.

Sounds like you're insecure about being in public with women. Maybe this has happened to you where someone has swooped up your girl? Never happend to me because I chose women who are not gutter whores, and view me as the leader. I also go country western dancing, should i tell my women not to go out with me and go dancing because its Simp behavior? If she is only dancing with me and I am only dancing with her, am I still a Simp? Should I not go out to the gun range because teaching a girl to shoot might ruin my gun culture? Should I not go out to eat dinner with a female for the fact that they might be hit on? If I want to go to a bar and get a beer with a woman I am acting like a Simp? Im am pretty sure you're just shit posting, but if not...Ok guy, enjoy living box devoid of all societal interaction. You make the gym your little MGTOW slice of heaven. When I go to a public gym, which I dont do now at all... I like seeing attractive women there, after I have worked out.

Regarding the original point of this conversation, we are in agreement more or less about barbell exercises and the importance of learning the correct form.
 
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