Lounge of Russian-Ukrainian War

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member

She showed up for her Moscow drug smuggling court hearing in a tie die Nirvana dopehead smiley tee shirt. If I was the judge I would have given her 20 years just for that... :laugh:

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quilter

 
Banned
Orthodox
Liberal world order mouthpiece The Guardian lamenting the shocking treatment of a friendly neighbourhood international arms dealer in Bulgaria being targetted by the terrorist Russians for absolutely no reason whatsoever apart from him simply doing his job and dealing arms to Ukraine

 

eradicator

Peacock
Agnostic
Gold Member
Her/Xir quadruple privilege powers (woman, black, lesbo & semi-celebrity) don't work in countries like Russia. Play stupid games, win stupid prizes Brittney.

On the bright side, the coed basketball team in her new jail is going to kick butt.

Seriously? Would anyone ever recognize a wnba player, anywhere ever? That’s not even a d list celebrity, that like z list, I don’t even think the die hard feminists follow the wnba. I might even say if I saw her in real life and felt chatty “oh hey you seem very fit, do you play any sports? You might be good at hoops!”

In all seriousness even a huge hoops fan probably couldn’t name a wnba player or their mvp from any season.

(I’m objecting to your use of the word semi celebrity). She’s probably received more press from her trial than she did in her Decade long wnba career
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Liberal world order mouthpiece The Guardian lamenting the shocking treatment of a friendly neighbourhood international arms dealer in Bulgaria being targetted by the terrorist Russians for absolutely no reason whatsoever apart from him simply doing his job and dealing arms to Ukraine


Ironically, they just admitted what was going on with one simple slipup:

Normies have never heard of the GRU. For the most part the only people who know about "GRU" are people who actually know what they're doing when it comes to intelligence and espionage.
 

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member
Why are they dressed in mock military garb? Industry and arts school? Supposed to be a joke?

It's an old European thing, in many countries of the Old Continent, graduates from elite universities have traditional military-style uniforms which they wear and parade in at graduation or even in national holiday parades alongside armed forces battalions. Grads even get sabres. You've got to admit, having a sabre on your office wall is more impressive than a framed diploma!

Here are some graduates of Ecole Polytechnique, the French MIT, whose uniforms haven't changed much in 200+ years:

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Prom/graduates' ball:

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Countries like France, Austria, Spain or Russia have had those traditions in place for centuries. Looking ahead I wonder how long they will be able to hold on to these undoubtedly sexist, homophobic, colonialist, fascist traditions. Already last year at Polytechnique, they ditched the skirts for women grads and went to pants. As well most of the women at the ball used to be dates of graduate men, but now the numbers are almost evenly split.


It's great to see that Russia is reviving their tradition here, which were shoved away by the bolsheviks and only recently revived, their school uniforms above are closely based on the uniforms of Czarist Russia:

 
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quilter

 
Banned
Orthodox
Ironically, they just admitted what was going on with one simple slipup:

Normies have never heard of the GRU. For the most part the only people who know about "GRU" are people who actually know what they're doing when it comes to intelligence and espionage.

I strongly suspect The Guardian, like The Independent newspaper, is nothing more than a platform for MI5 propaganda so that would make sense
 

AManLikePutin

Kingfisher
I meet new Ukrainians every week in my international event (Luhansk, Mariupol, Kharkov, Mikolayev, Odessa, Ivanofrankovsk, Kiev) and of course I try to banter about life and not to talk about war. Naturally we exchange insta.
I can tell you, well this is a sample size of close to 20 people over the past 4 months (mostly in their 20s) , that almost all are pro-Azov.
Almost all their Insta stories is either re-posting Zelenskyi, something with #RussiaTerroristState, or #SaveAzovDefenders
I really would like to have a conversation about the causes of war, what they think about 2014, the whole language thing and all...but very risky, so I've refrained so far.
*** Note: I talk to them in Russian and almost all but one of them has been very okay in speaking Russian with me. They are very nice individual people. We have a few Russians every week too and they talk a lot with each other with no problem. However, There was one weirdo who answered all my questions in Ukrainian and when I said I don't understand, she said I better study Ukrainian. :rolleyes:
 
I meet new Ukrainians every week in my international event (Luhansk, Mariupol, Kharkov, Mikolayev, Odessa, Ivanofrankovsk, Kiev) and of course I try to banter about life and not to talk about war. Naturally we exchange insta.
I can tell you, well this is a sample size of close to 20 people over the past 4 months (mostly in their 20s) , that almost all are pro-Azov.
Almost all their Insta stories is either re-posting Zelenskyi, something with #RussiaTerroristState, or #SaveAzovDefenders
I really would like to have a conversation about the causes of war, what they think about 2014, the whole language thing and all...but very risky, so I've refrained so far.
*** Note: I talk to them in Russian and almost all but one of them has been very okay in speaking Russian with me. They are very nice individual people. We have a few Russians every week too and they talk a lot with each other with no problem. However, There was one weirdo who answered all my questions in Ukrainian and when I said I don't understand, she said I better study Ukrainian. :rolleyes:
In my experience this is true but I talk to them in English.
 

CaliforniaBased

Woodpecker
Catholic
I meet new Ukrainians every week in my international event (Luhansk, Mariupol, Kharkov, Mikolayev, Odessa, Ivanofrankovsk, Kiev) and of course I try to banter about life and not to talk about war. Naturally we exchange insta.
I can tell you, well this is a sample size of close to 20 people over the past 4 months (mostly in their 20s) , that almost all are pro-Azov.
Almost all their Insta stories is either re-posting Zelenskyi, something with #RussiaTerroristState, or #SaveAzovDefenders
I really would like to have a conversation about the causes of war, what they think about 2014, the whole language thing and all...but very risky, so I've refrained so far.
*** Note: I talk to them in Russian and almost all but one of them has been very okay in speaking Russian with me. They are very nice individual people. We have a few Russians every week too and they talk a lot with each other with no problem. However, There was one weirdo who answered all my questions in Ukrainian and when I said I don't understand, she said I better study Ukrainian. :rolleyes:
Which country are you located in? These are all people that left Ukraine because of the war?
 

Gimlet

Pelican
Seriously? Would anyone ever recognize a wnba player, anywhere ever? That’s not even a d list celebrity, that like z list, I don’t even think the die hard feminists follow the wnba. I might even say if I saw her in real life and felt chatty “oh hey you seem very fit, do you play any sports? You might be good at hoops!”

In all seriousness even a huge hoops fan probably couldn’t name a wnba player or their mvp from any season.

(I’m objecting to your use of the word semi celebrity). She’s probably received more press from her trial than she did in her Decade long wnba career

She got a lot of press for kneeling during the National Anthem, and being outspoken about how it should not be played before WNBA games.


I wonder how she feels about being oppressed in the US if as she sits in a Russian prison.
 

Rogue Statistician

Robin
Protestant
The context was in terms of material comfort, so yes, thank you for proving my point.
Yeah.....its what I get for trying to edit the post at different times, where I ultimately posted a previous cache after my browser reloaded. Was trying to spare you the following in a more concise form.


The Mongols enjoyed a level of material comfort..….Latin scribes use the term Pax Mongolica to describe it.

"Material success" encompasses endeavors of personal utility outside the realms of the spiritual and or intellectual. <<<< This is how I understand the term. The Mongol Empire had some level of material success by this definition.

Mongol military personnel, the majority of the pre-expansion and early expansion populaces, owned several horses per capita. Comparatively, in Europe at the time a simple riding horse was 6 months to 1 year of a skilled laborers wage. A courser, used in hunting and light cavalry regiments cost over two years wage at a minimum contingent on bloodline. I doubt the resident military members on this forum own more than 2 vehicles (riding horses), let alone tanks (warhorses).

The primary aspects of the early Mongol diet was meat due to their nomadic culture. Few people currently reading this have the economic ability to eat multiple pounds of meat a day.

Pleasure is also another component of material success. Y-chromosome mapping in the region, and auxiliary regions, infers there was no lack of pleasure.

Other aspects of comfort enjoyed by the common Mongol include:
  • The establishment of the first efficient multinational postal service (Yam or Yamb). Something the United States Postal Service can't figure out with unlimited resources, and something that was so appealing to Tsarist Russia they were the first to appropriate the practice with the original naming convention and all.
  • Among the first civilizations to use two separate currencies in the mid to latter stages of the Empire, officially stamped "paper" from tree bark and precious metals coins. Such a system places the burden of exchange on the foreign merchants, allowing them to extract great wealth from the Silk Road and protect their internal commerce.
  • Cultural homogeneity reflected in the lack of internal strife. Where modern Swedes are deferential to the customs of foreigners to the point of allowing their children to be raped, beheaded and stuffed in freezers by jihadists the Mongols outright banned foreign customs with material implications (kosher, halal, circumcision) and ruthlessly put to rest any effort to create parallel systems.
  • No established (((merchant class))), subsisting itself on the installment of foreign customs like usury while influencing consumption habits of the native populace. Additionally the lack of urbanization curtailed changes in the populace's material interests. Instead their priorities were inline with their ancestral ethos and kept their culture stable.
  • You were rewarded for acts of bravery and skill, especially when Genghis Khan was still breathing as he'd personally give you a warhorse, weaponry, gold, etc from his personal collection
The Mongol Empire was not a nice place to be
This is a blanket statement, and for reasons I have tried to expand upon above I found it to be inattentive.

I now think I've wasted enough HTML, in this Slav on Slav crime thread talking about Mongolia.

Regards, RS.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
I think it's telling that most people in this forum don't live in Russia and have never even visited Russia for a considerable amount of time.
I have never been to Eastern Europe. My only experience with the people there was that there were some contractor women in the office I used to work at that were from both Ukraine and Russia. They were all good friends with each other.

Anyway, I don't have a personal stake in who wins the war. I was a military officer for 10 years and I'm an amateur military historian. If Ukraine can pull it off, so be it. However, that's not what I'm seeing so far. Ukraine has the advantage of interior lines but, has not been able to take advantage of it, at least from what I've seen.

It's true that Russia failed to take Kiev. My opinion is that it wasn't intended as a feint. I think the Russian plan was to try to take Kiev with a lightening strike, and if that failed they had already decided to withdraw so that it wouldn't turn into a quicksand/money pit situation. That's what happened.

Ukraine had two regiments in Mariupol, in well-entrenched positions, and they lost the city. Ukraine has tried two major counterattacks in the Kharkiv area, and neither has made any headway.

Russia has had some setbacks. Ukrainian anti-aircraft defenses, especially against helicopters, appears to have resulted in keeping the Russians from establishing clear air superiority over the battlefield. I notice that we haven't seen many videos of Russian helicopters or ground attack aircraft in action over the past month or so. But, neither have we of Ukrainian tactical air either. The Russians have resorted to using more stand-off weapons from their air forces, like air-launched cruise missiles, and they appear to be effective.

The Russians lost the flagship of their Black Sea fleet, lost Snake Island, and suffered a devastating attack on that southern port that sank or damaged three of their supply ships and blew up one of their ammo depots on the dock and likely killed a lot of their stevedores and logistics supply personnel. But, those successes by Ukraine have been isolated. The Ukrainian strategy of swarming the Russian navy with torpedo and patrol boats completely failed. The Ukrainian navy no longer exists.

Ukraine doesn't appear to have much flexibility in its tactical strategy in the east. They fortify the tree belts between the farm fields. Russia hammers the trees with artillery, mortars, and direct cannon fire, then machine-guns the Ukrainians when they inevitably and finally break and run. It's slow going, but so far the Ukrainians have failed to find an effective countermeasure. Unless they do, they will eventually, probably within six to nine months, have their backs at the Dneiper.

I see Ukrainians on various Internet forums, such as Quora, repeating the same thing about how "Russia's defeat is inevitable" or "we'll have Russia on the run within three months" or "Russia has lost half its army already." I'm not seeing that so far. We'll see what happens but as of right now, I don't think Ukraine has found an answer to its situation yet.
 
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