Men's Forum Posts we Ladies Like Alot

christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian
www.rooshvforum.com/threads/the-rise-of-fds-female-dating-strategy.37114

I will NOT go to this link on r*ddit. I find it still more valuable to read what a mens' based media forum writes...like this thread that is important. There's some really clear and truthful posts, some really insightful posts on Him, His Church and going back to Him. I wish more women found the mens' point of view like what is contained in this rooshv forum.

I am humbled and I feel fortunate to have this access to this info.

I still feel grateful for the book 'Lady' by Roosh V. Next month, I'm buying a few more copies to give away as gifts to younger women I see are struggling.
 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Love this type of observational social commentary. I have a lot to say on this!
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
I wish Roosh would at least allow us a "Like" button for us women to react to postings in the men's forums. I wish to cheer and encourage some who post there, who are saying correct, enlightening things. I guess God knows....(and I'm sorry, but I don't like men posting here. Sorry! Just me, I guess.)
 
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christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian
I know what you're getting at Iconwriter.
But the 'like' is the very thing we don't want to do. The example set for me in a forum in the past by a member asking me to stop 'liking' mens' posts was powerful.

You see, we don't want to encourage men to be seeking validation from women(the likes)
I don't know if you're redpilled but women are supposed to be seeking validation from men, qualifying ourselves to them, we are submissive to them. When i stopped 'liking' posts in that example, it helped more men get stronger.


However, i do wish i could have liked member Michael Witcoff's post at least because he is freshly married! Congrats to him on completing this mystery, this Holy step!
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
I know what you're getting at Iconwriter.
But the 'like' is the very thing we don't want to do. The example set for me in a forum in the past by a member asking me to stop 'liking' mens' posts was powerful.

You see, we don't want to encourage men to be seeking validation from women(the likes)
I don't know if you're redpilled but women are supposed to be seeking validation from men, qualifying ourselves to them, we are submissive to them. When i stopped 'liking' posts in that example, it helped more men get stronger.


However, i do wish i could have liked member Michael Witcoff's post at least because he is freshly married! Congrats to him on completing this mystery, this Holy step!
Ah, I see what you are saying.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
Love this type of observational social commentary. I have a lot to say on this!
This is an interesting thread to me too. A few of the posters wrote about how Anglo-Saxons are overly positive but (as a partial colonial Anglo) I’d say that it has more to do with complaining. Any kind of whining or complaining is *severely* looked down on (“you get what you get and you don’t throw a fit”). So when someone asks, “How are you?” The expected response is “good.” That means you’re not complaining, that you’re making the best of it, that your upper lip is unquivering. So while some people from the outside might see that as overly positive, what it really is, is an intolerance to complaining, imo.
 
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DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
This is an interesting thread to me too. A few of the posters wrote about how Anglo-Saxons are overly positive but (as a partial colonial Anglo) I’d say that it has more to do with complaining. Any kind of whining or complaining is *severely* looked down on (“you get what you get and you don’t throw a fit”). So when someone asks, “How are you?” The expected response is “good.” That means you’re not complaining, that you’re making the best of it, that your upper lip is unquivering. So while some people from the outside might see that as overly positive, what it really is, is an intolerance to complaining, imo.

I'm not sure about that. Perhaps, it was once that, but now it appears cold and sociopathic. The 'How are you' question is very tiresome and there is nothing genuine about it. I respect the 'not complaining' aspect of it, but its not really about resilience and stoicism, because if it were, this type of quiet stoicism wouldn't turn into passive aggressiveness. Don't know, just something painful about it all. I am not an Anglo, so I don't know the motivations, but difficult to deal with for sure, particularly for Eastern Europeans who basically put their heart on their sleeve (that too has its issues).
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian
There is a thread I'm reading now, that has valuable posts in it and is helping me. I'd like to record it here so I can reread it.
In the Non-Orthodox discussion forum, by member Oaks' thread. "Yes to God, No to Religion?"

Good stuff, good thoughts shared, good points.....its helped me stick to my plan to try another new location of the faith I was baptized in this summer. I go on Sunday.

Its wonderful to have time away from work to read.
I am reading my Bible again after a long break.

Valuable posts on this site. I appreciate reading all the opinions and ideas.
 
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joy_grace

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
I saw someone posting a video about a Jewish rabbi giving relationship and marriage advice here:


I really like the advice from this conservative Hasidic Jews. I'm not a big fan of Jooz, neither is this forum haha... But the advice here is spot on.

I would like to know some recommendations/references from others here about similar great advice on relationship and marriage from Christian perspective (outside of Bible verses). Thanks.

 

Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
I saw someone posting a video about a Jewish rabbi giving relationship and marriage advice here:


I really like the advice from this conservative Hasidic Jews. I'm not a big fan of Jooz, neither is this forum haha... But the advice here is spot on.

Hasidism is a movement that arose in response to Sabbetean-Frankists, so I think a lot of them are decent people. They also have strong communities, so some of the wacky diaspora behavior is curbed.

I like this guy's videos but something about his voice drives me up a wall and I don't know what it us.
 

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I saw someone posting a video about a Jewish rabbi giving relationship and marriage advice here:


I really like the advice from this conservative Hasidic Jews. I'm not a big fan of Jooz, neither is this forum haha... But the advice here is spot on.

I would like to know some recommendations/references from others here about similar great advice on relationship and marriage from Christian perspective (outside of Bible verses). Thanks.


I thought the same as you and I wished I could comment. I think there are many Jewish people who follow the Old Testament and Torah and try to live a moral life. Not all are Talmudic or crazy liberals driving culture in that direction. I do, however, believe that most Jewish people, even decent ones, benefit from the Jewish “network” they seem to have, but there are some that don’t really realize or recognize that being Jewish of any stripe tends to offer enormous material and economic benefits, by default, that we don’t all access. All that to say, many are good people just following their traditions and rabbis. I think that keeping that in mind is important because in the coming times there will be many Jewish people who accept the truth of Christ and we should not automatically write them off for being Jews.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian

if a fren I messaged with on a different space on the internet is reading through my posts, give this post a read and watch....its important to be aware of what yoga is.

At least learn and be informed. This priest is easy to listen to and he's thorough.
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
At the risk of soundling like those in-your-face people you see in the media who are easily offended, let me say only that some beloved members of our family are Jewish. Isn't it unkind to make sweeping statements, categorizing them as being all the same? Above all, they need our love and our prayers for salvation like anyone who is a potential Christian.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian

I know this op posted this writing to have what he thought all people on RVF could reply to but this excludes woman accounts. It looks like I can vote on his thread question and I will watch what he linked. To include women replying, I believe one would have to post in the Ladies' Forum scrolling all the way down near the bottom of the forums page to see this. Then I think nearly any topic thread can be posted randomly as there's no sub-categories.
Edited to add: I listened to this and I like that African village anecdote and the concept of what the desk is and I wish I knew what word he kept referring to, was it kaypee?

My answer is mostly with coworkers over the average of a seven day week worth of meals.

If I decide to go to the biannual Russian church Liturgy and meal next month, there will be about 20 people there to eat with, including two older ladies I miss talking with.
I'm very frightened to go to Russian or Ukrainian churches right now due to the Ten Commandments being broken in the world over there.

Although your thread is about meals only, I drink decaf with several hundred community members at night and on weekends but that's just drinking decaf, you wrote about meals.

This is all I'm willing to share, choosing to keep the frequency of dining with family and friends, private.

Except I will share, sometimes I eat in mall food courts near my bus stations alone and have noticed volunteers eating with developmentally challenged folks on what looks to be a led group outing.

That would be a Christian and wholesome way of helping community members and getting to share a meal.
 
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Akaky Akakievitch

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen

I know this op posted this writing to have what he thought all people on RVF could reply to but this excludes woman accounts. It looks like I can vote on his thread question and I will watch what he linked.

My answer is mostly with coworkers over the average of a seven day week worth of meals.

If I decide to go to the biannual Russian church Liturgy and meal next month, there will be about 20 people there to eat with, including two older ladies I miss talking with.
I'm very frightened to go to Russian or Ukrainian churches right now due to the Ten Commandments being broken in the world over there.

Although your thread is about meals only, I drink decaf with several hundred community members at night and on weekends but that's just drinking decaf, you wrote about meals.

This is all I'm willing to share, choosing to keep the frequency of dining with family and friends, private.

Except I will share, sometimes I eat in mall food courts near my bus stations alone and have noticed volunteers eating with developmentally challenged folks on what looks to be a led group outing.

That would be a Christian and wholesome way of helping community members and getting to share a meal.

Thank you, I was unaware that women were excluded from the thread but thank you for sharing with the ladies forum and glad to hear your response.

It sounds like you are more sociable than me! I'm just starting out in Orthodoxy so I imagine over time I will become more familiar with my brothers and sisters in Christ and attend more gatherings.

I think i'm just very weary these days of worldly people, so I've kept my distance. I think it's sheltered me from falling to sin in some ways, but loneliness can be pretty taxing at times. I think it's a sign that I need to do some outreach work myself and do my bit for those who are far worse off than myself. Selfishness, loneliness - they are such Western traits and it really can be a sickness.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian
Thank you, I was unaware that women were excluded from the thread but thank you for sharing with the ladies forum and glad to hear your response.

It sounds like you are more sociable than me! I'm just starting out in Orthodoxy so I imagine over time I will become more familiar with my brothers and sisters in Christ and attend more gatherings.

I think i'm just very weary these days of worldly people, so I've kept my distance. I think it's sheltered me from falling to sin in some ways, but loneliness can be pretty taxing at times. I think it's a sign that I need to do some outreach work myself and do my bit for those who are far worse off than myself. Selfishness, loneliness - they are such Western traits and it really can be a sickness.
Yes you sound selfaware and sociable. This was a great find in this podcast you linked. Thank you for this.

I can identify with knowing how to protect oneself from potential negative influences.

When we help others, when we serve others, we become more like Christ which is our ultimate goal-to love one another, to love everyone.
There are periods in our life where we must live(or we think we must live) without the communal mealtable.
Sometimes I spy a nice dining table through people's open curtains as I ride chauffered on a public bus past people's houses and I feel more anxious to get a living space where I can have my own dining table soon.

If you build it, they will come type of mentality. It used to be straight jealousy/envy/longing when I'd see people's dining tables but now I just feel more rush and adrenaline to get my own.
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Non-Christian

I can say in this midwestern Canadian city there is a small group of men across various Orthodox jurisdictions that go to see the Man of God movie.

I saw a man who gave me his old prayer rope on the same day as my baptism, standing outside the movie theatre when Man of God was playing. I stopped to say Hi and thank him again for the prayer rope and remind him I had it with me still with the new one I ordered (but it hadn't come yet in the mail and he still insisted I take his old one on my baptism day)before you know it, several other Orthodox male friends of his came up. In introductions, they were asking me how I knew the first guy and if I was Orthodox, which church I was going to and I hadn't been going to any one parish in particular for the 3 months prior.
So I, in turn, asked them where their parishes were and they were all different addresses.
So is there some network or forum for Orthodox men only, in my city, where they meet at Orthodox themed movies and probably other devout meetups? Probably.

Just sharing this to give hope that I've seen proof that Orthodox men are buddies, across jurisdictions too, at least in my city.

My wish is that this encourages men reading this to form your own Orthodox networks where you are.

You're not alone.
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
The men in our church got together and formed a Brotherhood. They meet together and work together to help out others where needed.
 

messaggera

Pelican
Woman
Other Christian
Via @Jive Turkey:

People don't use the word evil anymore, for the most part. A lot of things that go on in modernity can only be described as evil, but we couch them in psychological, sociological or other terms.

Even myself being supposedly redpilled, struggled with the cognitive dissonance of this, but we have fallen so far that many people publicly express opinions which would have meant death or exile a few hundred years ago. Specifically I am thinking in terms of people supporting infanticide. Because a lot of the vocal supporters are cute-ish younger-ish women who present well enough to society, we think "oh she just needs some Christ centered Chad to follow and everything will work out fine and she will change her mind".

But the impulse to kill your own child for any reason, let alone for convenience or for financial returns, that impulse comes straight out of hell and is something the demons must delight in. If you support abortion you support evil. Not always totally evil as a person, but that which is within you that supports abortion is evil and deeply narcissistic. I can think of no other way to describe it.

If you say it out loud it sounds crazy, 50% of Americans are in part deeply and satanically evil. But there it is. Very strange.

We might do well to rehabilitate the notion of evil which 20th century psychologists worked so hard to abolish and obscure. Sometimes people are just evil and it doesn't run much deeper than that.

If more men held this truth, presented here, the world would be a better place. Christian masculinity is holding this truth, and not allowing this type of evil to exist. Evil should be shamed.

Thank you @Jive Turkey for sharing your thoughts.
 

messaggera

Pelican
Woman
Other Christian
Did not know where to share this, but this post presents a strong argument: Polygamous societies are inherently unstable.

"Indeed not few men in the Middle East have historically had multiple wives, and tens of children, growing old as the leader of the tribe, where all the members of the tribe were related to him either by blood, or by marriage as children, and grandchildren in law. That is the life of a successful man, who was able to spread his genes, creating an entire tribe of people"

Polygamous societies are inherently unstable.

We now have de-facto polygamy in the West due to 'no-fault' divorce etc. Some famous examples are former US president Donald Trump who has five children by three different women. The prime minister of the United Kingdom (Boris Johnson) has seven children with three different women.

Marriage brings stability into a man's life.

When one man has multiple wives and other men are single the society becomes destabilised.

Muslims are allowed to practice polygamy and this is one of the reasons their societies are so messed up (radical jihad, suicide bombers etc.) A good example from the Muslim world would be the fall of the Turkish Ottoman Empire. The elite practiced polygamy so there was lots of single men who had no stake in the system. Polygamy was one of the reasons that the their empire fell.

The ancient Israelite's practiced polygamy which Jesus of Nazareth condemned (Matthew 5: 31-32).

Polygamous societies are inherently unstable
 
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