Mental Health Lounge

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
I am not sure if everything is just so scattered about with the new forum or if the threads I used to think existed on this topic were all in my head, but I am having a hard time find threads on general mental health. There are a few on specific mental health issues an one titled mental health but its about some guys bipolar problems.

Lets try a lounge where we can post videos, articles, or thoughts and questions about mental health.

As I am locked down in my apartment alone for three months here in Colombia (they have a real lockdown here, if you are outside when an its not your day of the week to be out for essential things you get arrested) I have found myself watching some pretty good videos on mental health. Lets get some conversation going about the topic cause in the big picture of things, its a pretty important aspect of life.

A video a watched today that had some interesting talking points
 

bucky

Pelican
I am not sure if everything is just so scattered about with the new forum or if the threads I used to think existed on this topic were all in my head, but I am having a hard time find threads on general mental health. There are a few on specific mental health issues an one titled mental health but its about some guys bipolar problems.

Lets try a lounge where we can post videos, articles, or thoughts and questions about mental health.

As I am locked down in my apartment alone for three months here in Colombia (they have a real lockdown here, if you are outside when an its not your day of the week to be out for essential things you get arrested) I have found myself watching some pretty good videos on mental health. Lets get some conversation going about the topic cause in the big picture of things, its a pretty important aspect of life.

A video a watched today that had some interesting talking points
That sounds tough, and it's no wonder you're thinking about mental health. In my US state we theoretically have a lockdown, but it's never been enforced in any meaningful way and now that we have riots going on most people seem to have more or less forgotten about the virus.

Good luck, hope you make it through ok.
 
Depression, ADD and anxiety seem like the three big mental health issues for men. And what makes things hard, is that many men don't go out and get the help they need. I have had my own struggles in these areas.
 
You can start with body-mind therapy like bioenergetics. What I don't like about modern mental health is that it focuses on the mind and ignores the body. In the video there are a couple of basic to advanced exercises to purify your mind and relax your body.
 

Speculation

Kingfisher
Its really important to do basic upkeep on yourself to keep your mental health in good shape. This becomes even more important as you get older; many conditions start presenting in people in their 30's for instance. Nothing I'm about to write will come as a shock to anyone and is real bread and butter stuff, but when we get really focused on things we forget how important certain activities are in keeping us well balanced.

Some basics:
  • Getting physical exercise and getting your heart rate up; Half Hour walk/Light calisthenics at least every second day as a minimum.
  • Eating a healthy diet. Vitamin supplements are not a substitute for getting enough vegetables in.
  • Getting exposure to direct sunlight both for your circadian rhythm and Vitamin D. Lightboxes can substitute in a pinch.
Other helpful points:
  • Social contact. Phoning family and friends if you're locked down. Social isolation is one of the leading contributors to mental health problems and is the reason that isolated confinement was and is used as a punishment.
  • Getting outside at least once a day (lockdowns permitting). Cabin fever is a thing.
  • Reduction in screen time - I haven't been able to clearly define why screen overuse impacts on mental health, but I strongly suspect its due to some form of dopamine dysregulation. This can particularly be an issue during lockdown where we distract ourselves with net browsing/videogames/movies to pass time.
After making a concerted effort to address the above I've found myself much happier and motivated.
 

Radoste

Pigeon
I haven't been able to clearly define why screen overuse impacts on mental health, but I strongly suspect its due to some form of dopamine dysregulation.
I've actually been looking into the screen question for a while now. Unfortunately, the studied effects of screens are usually physical criteria like weight/blood pressure/fasting glucose levels, and broad psychological evaluations that don't really give a clear image of what is happening inside a person. The data for a lot of these psychological studies about screens just come from questionnaires asking for screen-usage estimates and vague mental health questions like: "Do you consider yourself depressed? Y/N". However, that's not to detract from the mountains of evidence indicating that screens do have negative impacts on the mind and body (if you want to get into the spiritual effects, you're going to have to look into media ecology and philosophy of technology).

It's actually kind of frustrating looking at studies on the effects of screen media because I think everybody intuitively knows to some degree that screens are bad for them, just like I'm sure people who smoked in past centuries probably had an inkling that inhaling burning plant matter wasn't healthy. It's a matter of waiting for researchers to make some numbers proving common sense. The issue is that we are swimming in screen media like fish in the ocean. Nobody can really tell just how deep the effects are because almost everybody uses a screen every day. The world feels markedly different to me after just a couple days without using a screen at all. I wish I could tell what a month feels like, but I can't because everything has to be done online now. On top of this we have technocrats and transhumanists trying to drag society deeper down the technological rabbit hole without allowing a moment to ponder the implications.

Just think about what it means to use a computer or watch tv: your eyes and consciousness are utterly captured, you may be witnessing wildly stimulating content like an emotional movie or a super hi-res shooter game, the neurochemical activity in your brain is high...but you're alone and immobile. If you were to observe someone in a testing chamber sitting on a couch having the superlative entertainment experience, you would still see nothing but a man sitting on couch. There's just something incredibly wrong about the utter disconnect between the activity in the mind and the real physical environment, a kind of infernal dualism. And it's not like dreaming or reading a book because the screen experience is quantitative and horizontally-oriented. With screens, the complexity is all external; there's nothing going on inside the person imaginitively or spiritually.

As for actual biological mechanisms of harm, I found a plausible-sounding explanation by a child psychiatrist which posits it comes from the stress response due to overstimulation (blue light, vivid screen content, EMF, psychological engagement, dopamine release) that leads to a dysregulation of neurotransmitter activity and an increase in stress hormones (e.g. cortisol) which causes a range of issues with usage over time. Although adults would naturally be more resistant, I don't see why this wouldn't affect them as well.

My advice is to treat screen media like any other drug. If you can, I would try an electronic fast for as long as possible. Go outside, read books, do things in physical reality.
 

Speculation

Kingfisher
If you were to observe someone in a testing chamber sitting on a couch having the superlative entertainment experience, you would still see nothing but a man sitting on couch .... With screens, the complexity is all external; there's nothing going on inside the person imaginitively or spiritually.

As for actual biological mechanisms of harm, I found a plausible-sounding explanation by a child psychiatrist which posits it comes from the stress response due to overstimulation (blue light, vivid screen content, EMF, psychological engagement, dopamine release) that leads to a dysregulation of neurotransmitter activity and an increase in stress hormones (e.g. cortisol) which causes a range of issues with usage over time. Although adults would naturally be more resistant, I don't see why this wouldn't affect them as well.

My advice is to treat screen media like any other drug. If you can, I would try an electronic fast for as long as possible. Go outside, read books, do things in physical reality.
You've done very well at capturing most of my knowledge on the subject here, including the solution.

The sedentary lifestyle of sitting in a chair for hours at a time has bad physical outcomes. There are the negative effects on mental health through stressful overstimulation and neurotransmitter disruption. Motivation and drive to engage in more productive activity plummets because of the addictive nature of the media.

On top of this there is the opportunity cost of all the dead time mindlessly consuming the creative output of others rather than engaging in your own creative activities. For people who spend hours browsing the internet, I think they would be surprised at what they can ideate if only they would give their minds a rest from ceaselessy gorging on the products of the minds of others.

As you say, screen media is a drug, but it is so ubiquitous that no-one sees it as such (like sugar). It amazes me that my grandmother used to tell me 'TV rots your brains'. Intuitively that generation knew of the dangers because they could compare life with and without. We were all born into a world of screens and don't even question its presence.
 

Stats

Robin
any one have advice for helping some one else with strong bi polar?
normally I would just cut ties but its not a option in this situation.
 

Rob Banks

Pelican
I’ve been reading some articles about the relationship between religion and the “mental health” industry (i.e. psychiatry and psychology).

Apparently, “mental health” used to be handled by priests who were specially trained to deal with troubled people.

Here is an article I found quite chilling. It is by an atheist female psychiatrist. At one point, she claims that her clients’ religious beliefs often get in the way of “what is medically necessary” (read: drugging them and giving them modern secular life advice). Although she doesn’t outright say it, it is clear she views religious people as delusional.

Psychiatrist Thomas Szasz, although he was an atheist Jew, has written some good things about the mental health industry. He claims that “mental illness” is not a real illness but merely a metaphor for what he calls “problems in living” (i.e. spiritual problems/demonic influence).

If mental illnesses were really brain diseases — as is claimed by mental health industry — then these conditions would be handled and treated by neurologists and would not carry any social stigma (kind of like Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s).
 

Loner

Newbie
This summer my plan was to be more social, meet new friends, and maybe meet some girls. Ever since the lockdowns, for months I was going crazy by myself, but at this point I think I'm starting to learn to live with myself, which is interesting I guess, and definitely good. I don't think it's good to operate without being around others for so long, it seems like the longer I'm alone, the less I want to see other people. It's just so weird going day after day after day and basically being by myself for the whole time. I don't like it. I'm rambling because I have a ton of thoughts about this stuff.

Psychiatrist Thomas Szasz, although he was an atheist Jew, has written some good things about the mental health industry. He claims that “mental illness” is not a real illness but merely a metaphor for what he calls “problems in living” (i.e. spiritual problems/demonic influence).
This is also something that Jordan Peterson says, and I think he's right. I have a lot of mental health problems but my life is also pretty fucked and a lot of it's my fault, at least the way I see it.
 
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bucky

Pelican
This summer my plan was to be more social, meet new friends, and maybe meet some girls. Ever since the lockdowns, for months I was going crazy by myself, but at this point I think I'm starting to learn to live with myself, which is interesting I guess, and definitely good. I don't think it's good to operate without being around others for so long, it seems like the longer I'm alone, the less I want to see other people. It's just so weird going day after day after day and basically being by myself for the whole time. I don't like it. I'm rambling because I have a ton of thoughts about this stuff.
This is one of the many, many things that intensely bothers me about goodwhites and their enthusiasm for the lockdowns. I'm happily married with adorable little kids and able to work from home, so overall it's been great for me, but I get that it's not like that for a lot of people. It's bordering on cruel and unusual punishment for people like you who live alone, especially for those who don't have a close relationship with family or friends. Just another of many reason why this has all been solidly not worth it.

I'm glad you've managed to cope with it better than a lot of people have.
 
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Psychiatrist Thomas Szasz, although he was an atheist Jew, has written some good things about the mental health industry. He claims that “mental illness” is not a real illness but merely a metaphor for what he calls “problems in living” (i.e. spiritual problems/demonic influence).
Alexander Lowen described in his book The Betrayal of the Body (e. g. page 60) the schizoid condition showing demonic characteristics:
At times, when the schizoid patient is out of control and overwhelmed by his inner feelings, his facial expression becomes so distorted that it looks inhuman. When he allows a feeling of anger to arise, or when he adopts the facial expression of anger, his visage frequently looks demonic. What one sees is not anger but the dark eyes and knit brows of a frightening black rage. In the regressed and withdrawn schizophrenic the face and head often resemble a gargoyle. At other times the face seems to melt and an infantile smile plays about the mouth, without, however, involving the eyes.
He says that the dark feelings that are trapped inside us are demons. The difference is that he explains demons in a psychological, not in a supernatural manner.
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
This summer my plan was to be more social, meet new friends, and maybe meet some girls. Ever since the lockdowns, for months I was going crazy by myself, but at this point I think I'm starting to learn to live with myself, which is interesting I guess, and definitely good. I don't think it's good to operate without being around others for so long, it seems like the longer I'm alone, the less I want to see other people. It's just so weird going day after day after day and basically being by myself for the whole time. I don't like it. I'm rambling because I have a ton of thoughts about this stuff.
I am beginning to fear something similar with my months of isolation in my apartment alone. I went almost 3 months without having a face to face conversation here in Colombia. An I found that after that when running into a stranger in the elevator.... it was a bit odd trying to converse with them. An this is coming from someone who traveled the world alone an struck up conversations with strangers on a daily basis an was super comfortable doing so. My thoughts on the matter is that for me it will be like riding a bike. Once the lockdowns end an I start chatting with people again it will all come back to normal.... I hope
 
This summer my plan was to be more social, meet new friends, and maybe meet some girls. Ever since the lockdowns, for months I was going crazy by myself, but at this point I think I'm starting to learn to live with myself, which is interesting I guess, and definitely good. I don't think it's good to operate without being around others for so long, it seems like the longer I'm alone, the less I want to see other people. It's just so weird going day after day after day and basically being by myself for the whole time. I don't like it. I'm rambling because I have a ton of thoughts about this stuff.
Do you have a job with good colleagues? It should calm you down and restore your faith in your fellow men. I had similar concerns because of the anti-socialization during the coronahoax but I noticed myself becoming more open and talkative because these ridiculous times made me take things less seriously.

Despite all that, don't neglect your body during that time. Be physical through sports and work, do breathing exercises, and abstain from vices like drugs, masturbation, laziness etc. And don't be too hard on yourself. We are a fallen generation, so if there is a day or two where you slip up it's alright. Stay humble but don't put all blame on you. Just own yourself and be responsible, the rest is beyond your control.

getting out of NEETdom.png
 

Loner

Newbie
This is one of the many, many things that intensely bothers me about goodwhites and their enthusiasm for the lockdowns. I'm happily married with adorable little kids and able to work from home, so overall it's been great for me, but I get that it's not like that for a lot of people. It's bordering on cruel and unusual punishment for people like you who live alone, especially for those who don't have a close relationship with family or friends. Just another of many reason why this has all been solidly not worth it.

I'm glad you've managed to cope with it better than a lot of people have.
I mean yeah, I guess I'm still alive, so I'm doing better than some people. My drinking has increased, I've pretty much been drinking and smoking w**d every single night because I have nothing to do and no idea what to do. I basically feel like I'm in solitary confinement. By "learning to live with myself", I meant that I'm able to (sometimes) have a clear head and not be on a constant downward spiral. The main thing is I feel like I have no points of reference anymore, it's just me, myself and I.

I am NOT looking forward to the weather getting cold again coupled with another lockdown plus all the election hysteria that will be happening in the fall. I have problems with girls, I wanted to work on them this summer, I wanted to make some friends too, now I feel like it's too late and I'm gonna just be alone as usual. Honestly, if it goes that way, and I fear it will, then fall/winter 2020 is going to be the hardest time of my life - and I'm sure many others as well.
 
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