More men join nursing field as stigma starts to fade

Lucario

Woodpecker
Thank you for the advise. I was always told to not go into female dominated workplaces by my red pill friends but Nursing looks good and fits well with my natural attitude to help people and interest in the human body .

Cattle Rustler said:
I'll drop in my bit of advice as someone who HIRES/FIRES nurses, LVNs and RNs respectively.

If you're a male, don't go into nursing!

Your choices will be severely limited, especially if you go into home health or pediatrics. Most people will prefer a female nurse as they think every male nurse if a perv or possible rapist...I'm not kidding. It hurts every time I interview a male nurse as I don't have much work for him.

On the other hand, you can excel where women cannot. That is with higher acuity or heavy/violent patients. Taking that into consideration, you can ask for a higher pay rate due to the environment.

If you go into nursing, have a great work ethic and be dependable. The last two are traits that female nurses lack because they know they're more in demand. A male nurse who is dependable and has good skills with always have a job and make good money. I know an RN who is making 200K a year making his own schedule because 1- he knows his shit 2 - he's always up to the challenge, no matter how challenging it gets.

Are there anyways of assuring the employer that I do not go by the "perv or possible rapist" male nurse stereotype ?

What are the best fields of nursing for a male to pursue fresh out of university ?

scubadude said:
I am a RN. It's just like anyplace you find a lot of women, their cliques and groups, gossipy and catty. When they ask me if it bothers me listening to their shit day after day I usually just tell them I used to manage strip clubs so there really isn't much difference. That usually stop that.

As far as sleeping with them goes, I've done it two ways, be a complete player or none at all. If they all know you're banging around the hospital then they don't care and many will even want to get a drink after work because they know you won't get all clingy etc. Or fuck none of them and don't worry about listening to their shit (that's what I'm mostly doing now).

As others said, yes nurses seem to be the easiest and are always talking about sex. I don't see too many Dr's that actually pull much for a variety of reasons.

Like any career, you will have days you love your job and days you wonder why you chose it. For the most part I like it. I write my own schedule and make good money.

What kind of anti-male laws are you referring to?

Is it possible to keep a low profile and still sleep with them ? I have never actually pulled in a workplace situation and would appreciate pointers on how to go about this.

By anti-male laws, I was referring to sexual harassment laws like false rape or false sexual assault accusations that women make against men in the workplace . The law assumes guilty until proven innocent. I was curious about the likely hood of such a thing occurring in the nursing workplace and how to avoid such a thing since it can cost one their career.
 

Meadowlark

Hummingbird
Gold Member
This is all I can think of while reading this thread:


 

The_CEO

Pelican
scubadude said:
rekruler said:
Lothario said:
Architekt your questions can not be answered in one post, I will try to Simplify . Do it only if you love it and have passion for the field not for money. If money is your goal you better put your hours of hardwork else where.

yes , you can be a physician and still have life outside if you are living a life with minimal expenditure and have a lifestyle that fits what you make.

Just curious, but why do you say that go into medicine only if money is NOT important to you? Currently, there is mad bank to be made as an MD if you choose the right specalties. I really don't know of too many other sure things that allow a dude by his late 20's and early 30s to make $500k+ the way EM does, for example, while still giving plenty of flexibility and lifestile options. Or, alternately, be a spine surgeon and by your mid 30's be closing in on $1 million/year.

That is the current state. Is your warning about money in reference to where you foresee the medical field moving in the medium to long term?


Not every med student can go into those fields. There are limited numbers of residency spots and the higher paying/ better lifestyle ones are extremely competitive to get into. I give props to the ones who do spines, that is something I would never wish on anyone, those surgeons are miserable because of the patients and workload.

if "EM" means Emergency Med, those numbers sound way off too (at least double what they realistically make)
 
The_CEO said:
if "EM" means Emergency Med, those numbers sound way off too (at least double what they realistically make)

I do mean emergency medicine, and nope, it's not double what they realistically make. The average salary for EM certified docs is slighty above 300k at an average of 12 shifts/month. Go to a part of the country with higher than average pay (medical pay is highly location dependent) and work more than 12 shifts in a month and you can realistically earn $500k if you're not afraid of putting in the time. For a young dude just out of residency who still has stamina, it's more than realistic to be making mad bank in that specialty while still having plenty of "me time" due to the shift nature of the work.
 

Elixir

Pigeon
Lucario said:
What are the best fields of nursing for a male to pursue fresh out of university ?

I think ER, the operating room, or the ICU would be the best options. If you have a few years under your belt in ICU , you're able to apply for a CRNA program (nurse anesthetist). I've worked in the operating room as a surgical technician for five years love it. The ER from what I've heard can be love it or hate it depending on your personality. If you like trauma and fast paced environments then an ER at a teaching facility would be a sweet gig.

I'm also surprised no one has mentioned travel nursing here. There are companies that offer travel assignments for a wide variety of medical fields, including nursing(in several departments), surgical technicians, radiology techs, etc. You get a tax free travel stipend, housing is paid for, or you can choose to find and pay for your own place and receive a tax free housing allowance and pocket the difference. I know a guy who owns a nice renovated trailer, travels solo, and rents a lot in an RV park and makes bank just on hype housing allowance. You have jobs available all over the country, and take 13 week assignments. Most companies prefer a year or two experience in your field however and won't hire a rookie fresh out of school. You're generally expected to hit the ground running once you arrive at a facility.
 

deuce

Robin
Gold Member
Good to see this thread. I'm knocking out my prereqs now in between overseas work trips (semester on, semester off) and will start nursing school next fall.

I'm going to go the military route; I was in the Army before but am looking to be an ER or CC RN in the Air Force.

I am curious how most male nurses in their mid/late thirties have fared in nursing as a second career? A good friend of mine here in the mountain West became a nurse at 38, he's now 43 and killing it as a flight nurse.
 

The_CEO

Pelican
rekruler said:
The_CEO said:
if "EM" means Emergency Med, those numbers sound way off too (at least double what they realistically make)

I do mean emergency medicine, and nope, it's not double what they realistically make. The average salary for EM certified docs is slighty above 300k at an average of 12 shifts/month. Go to a part of the country with higher than average pay (medical pay is highly location dependent) and work more than 12 shifts in a month and you can realistically earn $500k if you're not afraid of putting in the time. For a young dude just out of residency who still has stamina, it's more than realistic to be making mad bank in that specialty while still having plenty of "me time" due to the shift nature of the work.

My understanding is that the ER median salary is about 250-300 approx. and the top end is around 390.

Your explanation makes sense: competitive market + OT.
 

Clyde

Woodpecker
Female nurses are extremely catty and not efficient. I predict in one generation. The majority of nurses will be men.
 

Drazen

Ostrich
Gold Member
Cattle Rustler said:
I'll drop in my bit of advice as someone who HIRES/FIRES nurses, LVNs and RNs respectively.

If you're a male, don't go into nursing!

Your choices will be severely limited, especially if you go into home health or pediatrics. Most people will prefer a female nurse as they think every male nurse if a perv or possible rapist...I'm not kidding. It hurts every time I interview a male nurse as I don't have much work for him.

On the other hand, you can excel where women cannot. That is with higher acuity or heavy/violent patients. Taking that into consideration, you can ask for a higher pay rate due to the environment.

If you go into nursing, have a great work ethic and be dependable. The last two are traits that female nurses lack because they know they're more in demand. A male nurse who is dependable and has good skills with always have a job and make good money. I know an RN who is making 200K a year making his own schedule because 1- he knows his shit 2 - he's always up to the challenge, no matter how challenging it gets.

Be a surgical RN. A lot of the surgeons I know would rather work with a male nurse than a female one in the OR. They make faster decisions, more decisively and command a premium for it.
 

...

Crow
Gold Member
Lucario said:
Thank you for the advise. I was always told to not go into female dominated workplaces by my red pill friends but Nursing looks good and fits well with my natural attitude to help people and interest in the human body .

Cattle Rustler said:
I'll drop in my bit of advice as someone who HIRES/FIRES nurses, LVNs and RNs respectively.

If you're a male, don't go into nursing!

Your choices will be severely limited, especially if you go into home health or pediatrics. Most people will prefer a female nurse as they think every male nurse if a perv or possible rapist...I'm not kidding. It hurts every time I interview a male nurse as I don't have much work for him.

On the other hand, you can excel where women cannot. That is with higher acuity or heavy/violent patients. Taking that into consideration, you can ask for a higher pay rate due to the environment.

If you go into nursing, have a great work ethic and be dependable. The last two are traits that female nurses lack because they know they're more in demand. A male nurse who is dependable and has good skills with always have a job and make good money. I know an RN who is making 200K a year making his own schedule because 1- he knows his shit 2 - he's always up to the challenge, no matter how challenging it gets.

Are there anyways of assuring the employer that I do not go by the "perv or possible rapist" male nurse stereotype ?

Yeah, there's a simple way. Have great work ethic, don't lie, and show up on time. The male nurses who have those traits always have work and making major bank because families really appreciate them.

But it's difficult to change a person's perspective at first.
 

Blackhawk

Kingfisher
One of the Orderlies pushing a friend's bed through the halls at SF General told me matter of fact he was making 82k, and that none of the nurses had the strength to push beds around between rooms. He was also doing a travel assignment at the hospital same as nurses do.

He was not buff. I'd say he was 5'2 and 160 lbs. Don't know if he was pulling overtime to get to his number. He was just pushing beds on the same floor level, or using one of the many elevators if they needed to move up or down to another floor. Didn't look that physically challenging to me.

Being an Orderly may be something to consider if you want to check out the work environment first before you commit years to getting a degree.
 

The_CEO

Pelican
deuce said:
Good to see this thread. I'm knocking out my prereqs now in between overseas work trips (semester on, semester off) and will start nursing school next fall.

I'm going to go the military route; I was in the Army before but am looking to be an ER or CC RN in the Air Force.

I am curious how most male nurses in their mid/late thirties have fared in nursing as a second career? A good friend of mine here in the mountain West became a nurse at 38, he's now 43 and killing it as a flight nurse.

Are you doing your pre-req's at a 4 year college or somewhere else?
How long does that take?
 

Lucario

Woodpecker
I'll be commensing the first week of my nursing course on July.

I do not mean to make the bullet points will sound distasteful, but I will keep it toned down as much as I can.

Just out of curiosity, I do have some small reservations about it and I was wondering how some of the nurses on RVF got over it. Don't get me wrong, the advantages far outweigh the small disadvantages, but in all fields of work, there are disadvantaged that must be overcome.

-Cleaning of old patients...dreading the thought of cleaning up a fat feminist landwhale.
-handling patients that cannot control their bowels + smell of poop
-aggressive patients
-vomit


Secondly, any RN nurses on here use nursing as a means of travelling ? Can you still find consistent work in places like Poland/Estonia/Bulgaria/Russia/ AKA pussy paradise ?

My main plan in all of this is to do nursing, work in Aus/US/UK for 3 years, then try and move to a European country for the women.
 

Lucario

Woodpecker
The_CEO said:
deuce said:
Good to see this thread. I'm knocking out my prereqs now in between overseas work trips (semester on, semester off) and will start nursing school next fall.

I'm going to go the military route; I was in the Army before but am looking to be an ER or CC RN in the Air Force.

I am curious how most male nurses in their mid/late thirties have fared in nursing as a second career? A good friend of mine here in the mountain West became a nurse at 38, he's now 43 and killing it as a flight nurse.

Are you doing your pre-req's at a 4 year college or somewhere else?
How long does that take?

You have the option to do a full RN nursing course which takes 1.8 months. You can PM me for details.
 

deuce

Robin
Gold Member
The_CEO said:
deuce said:
Good to see this thread. I'm knocking out my prereqs now in between overseas work trips (semester on, semester off) and will start nursing school next fall.

I'm going to go the military route; I was in the Army before but am looking to be an ER or CC RN in the Air Force.

I am curious how most male nurses in their mid/late thirties have fared in nursing as a second career? A good friend of mine here in the mountain West became a nurse at 38, he's now 43 and killing it as a flight nurse.

Are you doing your pre-req's at a 4 year college or somewhere else?
How long does that take?

I apologize for the late reply...

I'm taking a semester off each year to knock out the prereqs I can't CLEP or do online (chem and bio require labs). I work overseas so I'll work for most of the year then take a summer or regular semester off (depending on when the needed courses are available) and load myself up with 15-18 hours since I won't have to work.

I'm pretty much starting from scratch on the science end as I have a useless BA and no science or math background. It should take me 3 full semesters; different nursing schools have more/less required classes. I took a required psych class online, taught myself college algebra by just buying a textbook and doing the lessons while working overseas then CLEPed out of it upon my return home.

Spring 2015 will be my first full semester of prereqs, I'm taking 15 hours (4 classes) at at 4-year state university.
 

jcrew247

Kingfisher
Do you think its more popular for men to become nurses than other jobs?
It seems that IT work is still more popular for men, but I always see hospitals in dire need for nurses at job fairs and their doesn't seem to be enough women filling those spots.
I've seen news reports that Hospitals are hiring nurses from the Phillipines because there aren't enough Americans doing those jobs.
On the downside, nursing is strenuous work, and I think most men would either be an EMT or Doctor if possible.
But nursing seems like easier to obtain with just a 2 year degree.
IDK, the economy seems good now so their seems to be more jobs for men in retail and construction.
OTOH, male nurses are surrounded by generally attractive female nurses all day so the odds of dating an attractive and wholesome female increases a lot more than doing work in an IT company surrounded by nerdy men all day.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
jcrew247 said:
OTOH, male nurses are surrounded by generally attractive female nurses all day so the odds of dating an attractive and wholesome female increases a lot more than doing work in an IT company surrounded by nerdy men all day.

The average age of the US nurse is 45-51. I would take being surrounded by nerdy men over being surrounded by close-on-menopausal, deeply-regretting-doing-a-brutally-demanding-job-that-has-no-bucket-of-gold-at-the-end, deeply-hating-any-barely-attractive-young-nurse-in-their-area for 50 hours per week.

Seriously, the reason the West as a body is importing nurses left right and centre is because they can't get enough young women to get off the InstaMeth and actually help out fellow human beings. And even then, female nurses are not as a group terribly fit. If you want to look up a healthcare profession group, look at physiotherapists. On average they're ten years younger, keep themselves pretty damn fit, and -- because they're specifically trained for it -- know how to do a brutally physical job without destroying their spines in the process. Beats both the snooty feminist doctor and the low-end nurse who thinks she's one.
 
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