Most Difficult Situation You Were In

Steiner

Sparrow
Sounds like a question in a job interview. Do you have a job interview coming up and want to get some good answers?
Haha PERFECT response ready to go: I was once walking with my lgbtq+ biracial coworker and a white male (that drove a pickup truck) with a cross around his neck didn't hold the door. When I spoke up, he immediately assumed my pronouns. Shaken to the core, I had to fight my natural fight or flight reflex to find out what to do. I was so scared he might kill us where we stood. I eventually chose not to attack him, and later posted on twitter about it. I got so many retweets.

Any corporate HR will be drooling.
 
We all had a few to many bumps in our lives, but I just want to hear the most difficult situation you had to deal with and how did you go about it?

I for one will be keeping an eye on this thread as I find the subject outstanding.

If I may propose people give serious answers on

1. the most difficult single situation, as in "my car broke down in the middle of an unlit mountain road at 2am in a particularly heavy winter blizzard and i thought i was gonna die" type

2. difficult life situations, i.e. "was homeless for 9 months"
 

Steiner

Sparrow
I for one will be keeping an eye on this thread as I find the subject outstanding.

If I may propose people give serious answers on

1. the most difficult single situation, as in "my car broke down in the middle of an unlit mountain road at 2am in a particularly heavy winter blizzard and i thought i was gonna die" type

2. difficult life situations, i.e. "was homeless for 9 months"
I'll bite with a response like #1 to make up for my sarcastic earlier reply.

One of the most difficult situations (at the time) I have ever been in: One year during college, the lock cylinder on my VW Jetta froze. I could not turn the key in the cylinder to start the car, effectively making my car inoperable. The electronic security system would not allow me to bump-start it or turn the wheel. To make matters worse, I was working at an internship in the town of my college through winter break, and this occurred 3 days before Christmas. I needed the car for a 4.5hr drive to get home to see my family. I was also in the far north, and the snow was comin'
The stress began to build.

Trying to muscle the steering wheel and cylinder, the key soon broke off, flush with the edge so I couldn't pull it out. At this point I was getting desperate and frustrated.
I wildly searched the internet, looking for a solution. The only thing I found was towing it to a shop. This was obviously out of the picture due to Christmas looming. As my education was in electrical engineering, I began to think of how the cylinder interacted with the cars ECU to tell it to start. A day went by. Now it was the day before I had to drive home. Getting home from work that night I got back to business on the car, my mind burning, determined I would make it home in my German sleigh.

I eventually pried at the other side of the lock cylinder, which was attached to a small connector with two or three wires. This cap that was attached had electrical connections on the inside, about three of them in different ring formations. I deduced that the turning of the key (and cylinder) connected different parts of these rings to each other, which corresponded to different modes and eventually ignition. I took a small piece of wire, and began poking at different parts of these pads. At first, the lights of the car came on, and if I held it just right, stayed on.

Then I had my moment. Touching one end of the wire to the inner circle, and then to the outer circle, the car began to turn over and come to life! But I had another problem, it didn't stay on once I removed the wire.

I took the cylinder-end inside, and looked for what I had in the house. I ended up soldering wires to the connections on the cap, and using a light switch to start my car. It felt and looked like a hotwire.

So I began to drive home the next afternoon, elated that this tribulation was behind me. As I was going down the highway, my car died. I coasted it to the side of the road. A policeman came up to my passenger side window, where my girlfriend of the time was sitting. He took one look in with his flashlight and looking at a tangle of wires and a light switch under the steering column, in my lap, he said "are you alright?". My girlfriend was the type to pipe up in this situation and she uttered "He's an electrical engineer!". The cop responded with "Oh come on man, you should be able to figure it out!"

I twisted the wires around, and regaining a good connection, started the car back up. The police officer left, and I drove the rest of the way home.

So ended one of the most difficult moments of my life (at the time).

I say at the time because now I look back and figure I could have just rented a car. Undeveloped, broke, college mind me didn't factor that in.

Not the most serious of circumstances, but to a young man with untested mettle it was a good lesson in self reliance.
 

SoftFor

Sparrow
Hi! Thanks for all your responses. LOL, I'm sorry if I sounded like that. I actually had an interview last week.

My friends (well, there's only a few) think I'm a bore, and that's okay. I like topics like this and other psychology or philosophy-related stuff.

And to answer my own question (I don't wanna bore you so I'm gonna make it short), I lost my mom when I was on the 7th month of my pregnancy. It was sudden and I was looking forward to sharing with her my journey as a new mom, you know, asking all that stuff. I really thought she's gonna be there with me. She's the only one I have. So it was kind of difficult. Kinda held me back for a long time. So every difficult situation I was in from then on became more difficult because of it.

Now, I believe I already coped. I miss her but life goes on. I'm happy and I know she is.

But hey, no dramas. This thread is not intended for me to vent or something. LOL Pure academic or whatever term should be used similar to it ;)
 

JayR

Woodpecker
Physical: Nearly a full-year recovery from serious motorcycle wreck in my early 20s. When they tell you that you won't be leaving the hospital for "several months," and they're not sure you'll be able to walk when you do, the despair and hopelessness is overwhelming.

Mental/Emotional: Trying to decide whether or not to continue fighting for access to my kid in the face of family court-sanctioned parental alienation and maternal gatekeeping. Sometimes it just seemed like it might be better to save my own sanity and spare young daughter exposure to the constant conflict and fighting by just fading away and finding her later when she grows up. However, research indicated that almost all adult victims of parental alienation say "I wish Dad had fought harder..." so that's what I did. Also, the idea of going through life wondering if she missed me was unbearable. Glad I hung in there.

In both cases I had unwavering support from my family, which made a huge difference.
 

Joe316

Robin
Mental/Emotional: Trying to decide whether or not to continue fighting for access to my kid in the face of family court-sanctioned parental alienation and maternal gatekeeping. Sometimes it just seemed like it might be better to save my own sanity and spare young daughter exposure to the constant conflict and fighting by just fading away and finding her later when she grows up. However, research indicated that almost all adult victims of parental alienation say "I wish Dad had fought harder..." so that's what I did. Also, the idea of going through life wondering if she missed me was unbearable. Glad I hung in there.

From your daughter's perspective her father represents the image of how men treat her (later) in relationships. Does he fight for her in case of trouble or does he abandon her. That influences her own relationships as an adult enormously.
 
Most challenging physically: in highschool I was on a tubing trip and we hit some rapids. A younger kid had fallen behind the group and got knocked out of his inner tube. He was getting tossed around on the rocks and I had to swim upstream to go catch him before he got killed. I'm a strong swimmer but it was a miracle I managed to catch him. I was livid afterwards and it was the first time I screamed at an adult. It was insane to take kids tubing through white water rapids.

Most challenging psychology: I was accused of sexual assault and spent several months under investigation. I'm usually pretty even keeled but for those few months I was physically sick with worry. After the cops have asked you the same question thirty different ways you will question your own memory. I also had no faith in the legal system, having seen innocent people get screwed. And the obvious lack of evidence seemed to drag the investigation out longer as the cops tried to find something to build a case on. It was hellish.
 

SoftFor

Sparrow
You had an extreme experience there. I'm up for a lot of things except water and heights.

True. The legal system is tainted. So the fear was reasonable.

Good thing you got out well. I mean, this could have caused anxiety and such. Did you consider going to therapy?
 

Younghound

Chicken
Getting through school was crazy... I was emotionally tortured growing up. How I made it through is sit through situations quietly...my options on what else I could do were limited anyway. Soon as I got to my 18th birthday I cut ties with started off on my own. I eventually graduated. And now an attorney

I started my own practise and for 5 years now I have tried to get it off the ground and it has been a tall order. Recently, I got a good court award only for an skewed appeal to take it away. Then it gets worse , the initial award was work I had put hours on end for and took out loans to sustain the workings around it. So I now:- (1) have lost a deserved award (2) currently in piling debt (3) lost motivation completely for anything law related

....How do I plan to solve this? I think I will take my life
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
OK let me share something personal also. I've been through a couple of chilling experiences, most notably the suicides of my uncle and father. What I learned is that these type of things is like a muscle and when you've once had the experience you will be much better able to cope with a second, for you know hot the process goes. But do you know what the real tough thing was? That was finding out all the stuff that we talk about here. 5 years ago I started in the pickup scene, first the Dutch scene then later RSD mostly. The loss of confidence combined with dissatisfaction and a continuous longing for more what was frankly put me in a state of constant depression and anxiety. Then when I thought I had figured it all out about material success and at one moment I had experiences like having sex with 5 women in 6 days I felt the deepest emptiness I could ever imagine. That coalesced with Roosh becoming more woke on the God pill, transforming his life to a Christian life and starting to proclaim the truth about corona to us, I clearly remember the night of the 4th of april to the 5th of april (it was a Saturday) last year, when Roosh took us on the road to the Wizard of Oz in his 5 hour stream Coronavirus is revolution. That was a real shock for me. I always was red pill ish on politics and society, active in Dutch alt-right circles, anti immigration, anti left all these things, but this was the first time I got fully introduced to the real power structure. That took me on a trip to David Icke, Alex Jones, Jay Dyer and others, diving into it. Basically that is what I did for the last year in my spare time. Finding out the truth. What I found is that everytime I thought I had found the truth (e.g. finding out how material success worked) there was a complete new layer underneath it with new depths. To me this led to great cognitive dissonance, as my world perspective was turned completely upside down regarding the material world, the power structure and at last God, for I grew up in a secular environment. These changes are big and I would give as a tip to everybody who are in an earlier stage of their awakening to the truth, go with the flow, look for information, click through different sources and you'll be guided by God to find deeper and deeper layers. Don't rush it, for that will cause a lot of cognitive dissonance and pain as I have experienced myself. So I'm happy that at this moment I have great sources online, this forum and the next step would be to form a real life network of people who are awake on these matters. But I have to be careful not to put my own will first, but God's. I hope someone learns from this message, but eventually even though you may go through this process in a way that seems not beneficial to you, probably that's what you need to learn. I genuinely believe that the information we're sharing now and the people who are awakening will one day coalesce into a culmination where everything will be clear to everyone of us, why we had to go through all the experiences we go through and learn all the things we learn. So trust the process and trust God. God bless <3
 
Getting through school was crazy... I was emotionally tortured growing up. How I made it through is sit through situations quietly...my options on what else I could do were limited anyway. Soon as I got to my 18th birthday I cut ties with started off on my own. I eventually graduated. And now an attorney

I started my own practise and for 5 years now I have tried to get it off the ground and it has been a tall order. Recently, I got a good court award only for an skewed appeal to take it away. Then it gets worse , the initial award was work I had put hours on end for and took out loans to sustain the workings around it. So I now:- (1) have lost a deserved award (2) currently in piling debt (3) lost motivation completely for anything law related

....How do I plan to solve this? I think I will take my life
Would love an update to see how you're doing. Find a good church and get to know some members. Pray. Get some exercise. Etc. Hang in there, God bless.
 
I've done the trifecta - war, homeless and jail. War was the scariest, homeless was the most exhausting, and jail was the most boring, feeling like you are wasting away.

But the great thing about hard times is they make you less afraid of future hard times. You get tougher, and hopefully have picked up faith along the way.

I was not a Christian during any of those hard times, but I still prayed some. While at war, music is what got me through a lot of it. For jail, it was exercise and reading. And while on the streets, honestly that life is so hard and tiring that you you are always busy - trying to stay fed, warm, have a place to sleep, etc. Ultimately it was the VA and some friends that helped me get situated (but really God has been looking out for me in big ways for some time now).
 

SpyofMoses

Sparrow
Reading the way you all have moved past these events and either accomplished something great or learned something new is inspiring. The Lord strengthens us through the challenges he gives us in life.

One of the toughest things I've been through is staying awake for 2 weeks straight. It was not by choice, of course. I had a job that required being at my station at 5am Monday through Friday; and that was after a 45 minute commute to get there. Since everyone else around me could do that just fine for years, I thought I could just keep at it and get used to it. The job involved using equipment that was so loud I was going deaf in spite of using hearing protection. After 2 years I never got used to it, but I did get used to coping with it. Then one day we had to show up a couple hours early. This threw my circadian rhythm so far out of wack that nothing could get me to sleep.

For 2 weeks, I tried everything you'll ever hear recommended to help a person get to sleep, and then some. None of it worked. This brought on a myriad of health problems seemingly out of nowhere. Of course, it wasn't out of nowhere, this is what sleep deprivation does to the body. My hearing also went from a mild tinnitus to being near deaf. Eventually, I don't know where I got the idea from, but I put cardboard cut outs in my windows and turned my apartment into the batcave. There was no light getting in or out; complete darkness. Finally I slept.

After a few nights, I had a moment where I was just sulking in my room and wishing my hearing would come back. Then the ring of my tinnitus seemed to turn up even louder before it subsided and about half the hearing I had lost returned! I immediately got on my knees and thanked the Lord for this miracle.

Since then, I have actually been through more challenging events in my life. But that experience taught me a valuable lesson about taking care of myself and leaning on my faith when times are tough.

I have a better job now.
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Not myself. But, I believe, a story everyone on the forum should know.

56a0035ddd0895f2678b47c1


For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of World War II

Link: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/hist...uman-contact-unaware-of-world-war-ii-7354256/

Summary:

In Russia there is a denomination of Old Believers. They are Orthodox who refused the reformations of the 17th century. These reformations were promoted by the czar to modernise Russia so that it could compete with the rise of Northern/Western Europe. For not going along with the reforms, Old Believers were murdered.

When the communists came to power the Old Believers were again in the crosshairs. Living peacefully alone and molesting no one was not good enough. They had to believe what the communist authoritise told them to believe and serve the new commune-modernist system. They were again murdered.

In 1936 one family of Old Believers left their home with a few wares and seeds and began moving deeper and deeper into the forests of Siberia. They remained all but cut of from the world for over 40 years.

One year their barley crop was eaten by animals and it took years of guarding the last few seeds and slowly growing them into a considerable supply. During this period there was a time when they had no food and resorted to eating their clothes, which were made of bark. The mother of the family refused to eat the bark clothes, so that her children could. She died of starvation. It is unlikely social media addicted materialists of the modern world could do such a thing.

They were discovered by scientists in 1978:

Led by Pismenskaya, the scientists backed hurriedly out of the hut and retreated to a spot a few yards away, where they took out some provisions and began to eat. After about half an hour, the door of the cabin creaked open, and the old man and his two daughters emerged—no longer hysterical and, though still obviously frightened, “frankly curious.” Warily, the three strange figures approached and sat down with their visitors, rejecting everything that they were offered—jam, tea, bread—with a muttered, “We are not allowed that!” When Pismenskaya asked, “Have you ever eaten bread?” the old man answered: “I have. But they have not. They have never seen it.” At least he was intelligible. The daughters spoke a language distorted by a lifetime of isolation. “When the sisters talked to each other, it sounded like a slow, blurred cooing.”

Shortly after all but one of the siblings died, followed by the father seven years later. There now remains one daughter who has lived at their settlement, alone, for the past 33 years. She doesn't wear a mask.

Settlement: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Lykov+family+settlement/@51.4608426,88.4248977,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m12!1m5!8m4!1e2!2s105056946368439416624!3m1!1e1!3m5!1s0x42cea90048d7ec01:0x846cb50632801d8!8m2!3d51.4608426!4d88.4270864!16s/g/11c603h46l

Christian perspective:

 
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