Movies with a strong Christian component

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I was blown away by the movie A Man For All Seasons, about an English statesmen who stuck to his faith in spite of intense pressure against King Henry VIII. The acting and dialogue were superb.


And of course there is The Island (Ostrov) [2006] about a Russian monk in repentance.


Any more movies like these two?
 
These days I would settle for a movie without diversity quotas and without excessive violence or blatant in your face sexual depravity. The wife and I only watch stuff released before 2010 at the very latest. 20th century movies and series are much preferred as the agenda is already present but it's a lot less prevalent. Any post COVID entertainment is completely unwatchable.
 

Athanasius

Pelican
The Apostle (Robert Duvall) is a great film, full of memorable lines.

The 50s had lots of Biblical epics like The Robe, Ben Hur, Quo Vadis, the Silver Chalice.

Tale of Two Cities (1935 version). Many films before the 1960s had Christian-influenced themes like Green Dolphin Street and Three Godfathers.

"Paul, Apostle of Christ" is one of the better movies I've seen in years, especially the last half.

Shadowlands - BBC version is superior to the Anthony Hopkins one.
 

Thomas More

Hummingbird
I rarely see it mentioned, but I liked The Prince of Egypt, which is an animated telling of the story of Moses.

I remember finding it very powerful when I watched it, and perhaps for that reason, I've never happened across it again. Now that it's on my mind, I will make a point of finding it and watching it again.

I checked a Christian review site, and they said they get several biblical details wrong. However, they are fairly close, and none of the details seemed heretical. I would recommend checking the biblical passages to stay on solid ground.

On the positive side, God speaks to Moses from the burning bush, and Moses heeds God's call. God empowers Moses to do what he's called to do. One reviewer on the Christian site said God is the star of the movie. Few movies make God and his calling the central plot point.
 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I wouldn't say that Martin Scorsese was inspired by his faith, but 'Silence' was a watchable movie for me, compared to anything coming out of Hollywood these days. At least it did not seem to openly mock or disrespect Christian, even though I think it is more for entertainment purposes
I had to update my comment as to not spoil it for others.

I found the movie overly long and repetitive in some parts. I wouldn't say it explicitly disrespects Christianity, but the overall message is questionable.

I wouldn't say Scorcese was "inspired by faith" either. Almost the opposite.
 

PaulC

Robin
Pridel Angela (Angel's Aisle) - After the October Revolution a small island with orthodox monastery is passed to Finland. The Finn Army places there an executive staff of coast artillery. The Soviet command sends to the island a former priest's son and now soviet commissar Maxim Proshin. He is to wriggle way into the island as a novice and murder one of the high rank Finnish military man. Maxim will have to pass a way of penance and mental rebirth to find himself and achieve self actualization.


 

NickK

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I wouldn't say that Martin Scorsese was inspired by his faith, but 'Silence' was a watchable movie for me, compared to anything coming out of Hollywood these days. At least it did not seem to openly mock or disrespect Christian, even though I think it is more for entertainment purposes

A demonically inspired movie. Sorry to say this. It's utterly demonic and blasphemus.
 
The Apostle (Robert Duvall) is a great film, full of memorable lines.

The 50s had lots of Biblical epics like The Robe, Ben Hur, Quo Vadis, the Silver Chalice.

Tale of Two Cities (1935 version). Many films before the 1960s had Christian-influenced themes like Green Dolphin Street and Three Godfathers.

"Paul, Apostle of Christ" is one of the better movies I've seen in years, especially the last half.

Shadowlands - BBC version is superior to the Anthony Hopkins one.
Prefer the polish version of Quo Vadis:

The Hollywood version had the "Christian woman" be very obnoxious and feminist compared to the Polish version.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
Silence is anti-Christian and promotes apostasy. Avoid.

Here is my list, in no particular order:

1. Chariots of Fire (1981): A British sports movie about two Olympic runners, one of whom ends up becoming a Christian missionary in China. This is a deeply touching movie about faith, though it has some unfortunate propaganda about the harm of 'anti-Semitism.'

2. Hacksaw Ridge (2016): Inspiring Mel Gibson war drama. Beautifully directed tale of a man whose Christian faith leads him to serve as a medic in the Pacific during WWII.

3. The Chosen (2020-ongoing): Not a movie, but rather a TV show about the life of Jesus. For the most part, it's well done.

4. The Ten Commandments (1956): Dramatization of the Book of Exodus, starring devout Christian and Chad, Charlton Heston.

5. Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954): Action-packed movie set amidst the persecution of Christians in the Early Roman empire.

6. Quo Vadis (1951): A movie about Nero's persecution of Christians -- wonderful depiction of St. Peter.

7. Gods and Generals (2003): A film about the Civil War, and in particular Stonewall Jackson. Jackson's faith is integral to the story, and there are many scenes of prayer.

8. The Chronicles of Narnia (2005-2010): This entire series is of course an allegory for the Bible.

9. Becket (1964): A movie about Thomas Becket, a martyr who is venerated as a Catholic saint.

10. The Sound of Music (1965): The theme of following God's will is emphasized here. Nuns are respected, and the Church is seen as a beacon of hope.

11. I Confess (1953): Amazing Alfred Hitchcock thriller featuring a priest who is framed for murder. Respectful of the man's vocation, and with some beautiful scenes of Quebec City.
 
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- the entire works of Andrei Tarkovsky

- Ordet, by Dreyer

- The Last Temptation Of Christ, by Scorsese

- How Green Was My Valley, by Ford

- Diary Of A Country Priest, by Bresson

- My Night At Maude's, by Rohmer

- The Gospel According to St. Matthew, by Pasolini

- The Flowers Of St. Francis, by Rossellini

None of them are tidy "movie of the week" pablum. They are all about fallible humans with doubts, and are made for an adult audience. But the above are some of the richest pieces of cinematic art ever made.
 
A demonically inspired movie. Sorry to say this. It's utterly demonic and blasphemus.

This is why I tried to add a disclaimer to the recommendation. But Scorsese had a difficult time funding it for 25 years because it cast Christians in a sympathetic light. Also he was supposedly snubbed for any awards for the same reason, despite very positive reviews. But it is a movie for entertainment and not theological interest.
 

DeFide

Robin
Black Robe (1991)
In the 17th century, a Jesuit missionary nicknamed Black Robe by the natives and his small party of companions try reaching the Huron tribe in Canada all while facing mistrust, Iroquois warring parties and harsh winter conditions.


Silence (2016)
In the 17th century, two Portuguese Jesuit priests travel to Japan in an attempt to locate their mentor, who is rumored to have committed apostasy, and to propagate Catholicism.


The Mission (1986)
Eighteenth-century Spanish Jesuits try to protect a remote South American tribe in danger of falling under the rule of pro-slavery Portugal.
 
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Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
Black Robe (1991)
In the 17th century, a Jesuit missionary nicknamed Black Robe by the natives and his small party of companions try reaching the Huron tribe in Canada all while facing mistrust, Iroquois warring parties and harsh winter conditions.


Silence (2016)
In the 17th century, two Portuguese Jesuit priests travel to Japan in an attempt to locate their mentor, who is rumored to have committed apostasy, and to propagate Catholicism.


The Mission (1986)
Eighteenth-century Spanish Jesuits try to protect a remote South American tribe in danger of falling under the rule of pro-slavery Portugal.

Stop promoting cringe anti-Christian films like Silence.

That movie is about a Jesuit who apostatizes and becomes a Buddhist. This is portrayed as a virtuous thing, despite the fact that the Japanese Christians he is supposed to be serving were willing to die for him.

I haven't seen the other two movies, but Silence should be avoided.
 

DeFide

Robin
A demonically inspired movie. Sorry to say this. It's utterly demonic and blasphemus.
Why do you say that?

It was pretty faithful to the novel it’s based upon, from what I remember (I read the novel about 10 years before the movie was made). Graham Greene said it was “one of the finest novels of our time.”

Anyway, if it is blasphemous, blame the novel.

Silence (沈黙, Chinmoku) is a 1966 novel of theological fiction by Japanese author Shūsaku Endō, published in English by Peter Owen Publishers. It is the story of a Jesuit missionary sent to 17th century Japan, who endures persecution in the time of Kakure Kirishitan ("Hidden Christians") that followed the defeat of the Shimabara Rebellion. The recipient of the 1966 Tanizaki Prize, it has been called "Endo's supreme achievement"[1] and "one of the twentieth century's finest novels".[2] Written partly in the form of a letter by its central character, the theme of a silent God who accompanies a believer in adversity was greatly influenced by the Catholic Endō's experience of religious discrimination in Japan, racism in France, and a debilitating bout with tuberculosis.[3]

Shūsaku Endō (遠藤 周作, Endō Shūsaku, March 27, 1923 – September 29, 1996)[1] was a Japanese author who wrote from the rare perspective of a Japanese Roman Catholic. Together with Junnosuke Yoshiyuki, Shōtarō Yasuoka, Junzo Shono, Hiroyuki Agawa, Ayako Sono (also Catholic), and Shumon Miura, Endō is categorized as part of the "Third Generation" (that is, the third major group of Japanese writers who appeared after World War II).

And:

While Endō wrote in several genres,[9] his oeuvre is strongly tied to Christianity if not Catholicism. Endō has been called "a novelist whose work has been dominated by a single theme ... belief in Christianity".[4] Others have said that he is "almost by default ... [labeled] a 'Japanese Catholic author' struggling to 'plant the seeds of his adopted religion' in the 'mudswamp' of Japan".[1] He often likened Japan to a swamp or fen.[10][11] In the novel Silence, an official tells a priest who has apostatized, "Father, it was not by us that you were defeated, but by this mudswamp, Japan." In Endō's stage version of this story, The Golden Country, this official also says: "But the mudswamp too has its good points, if you will but give yourself up to its comfortable warmth. The teachings of Christ are like a flame. Like a flame they set a man on fire. But the tepid warmth of Japan will eventually nurture sleep."[12] Thus, many of Endō's characters are allegories.[9]

He may not be embraced by fellow Christians—Catholics, in particular.[9] Some of his characters (many of whom are allegories) may reference non-Western religions.[9] While not the main focus of his works, a few of Endō's books mention Kakure Kirishitans.[13] Incidentally, he used the term "かくれ切支丹" instead of the more common "かくれキリシタン".[14]

His books reflect many of his childhood experiences, including the stigma of being an outsider, the experience of being a foreigner, the life of a hospital patient, and the struggle with tuberculosis. However, his books mainly deal with the moral fabric of life.

His Catholic faith can be seen at some level in all of his books and it is often a central feature. Most of his characters struggle with complex moral dilemmas, and their choices often produce mixed or tragic results.
 
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